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September 10, 1982 - Image 21

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-09-10

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ARTS

The Michigan Daily.

Friday, September 10, 1982-

Page 21

SrS
Records
Charles Mingus-'Mingus
in Europe, Vol. H' (Enja)
I tend to regard posthumous albums a
little suspiciously, remembering some
pf the Hendrix offerings (Joplin, etc.),
and posthumous live jazz albums even
,.more so (jazz artists seem to be copious
Enough studio musicians during their
natural vinyl lifetime).
While this record won't add to the
Mingus legend the way Charlie
Parker's post-release did, it does show
why Mingus' stock was so high in jazz
circles during the late '50s and early
'60s.
Mingus became well known as a first-
rate bassist after playing with Louis
Armstrong, Kid Ory and Lionel Ham-
ton in the '40s. His position as leading
Wzz innovator was established by his
work in such ensembles as the Red
Norvo Trio, where he encouraged im-
provisation within a group format.
(End of homework.) The quintet which
toured Europe in 1964 boasts some of
the finest musicians in any Mingus
collaboration: the famed Eric Dolphy
on bass clarinet and alto sax, Clifford
Brown ' on tenor, Jaki Byard on

--A selection of campus film highlights

S

keyboards, and Dannie Richmond on
drums, joined, of course by Mingus on
impeccable bass. This album was
recorded live April 24, 1964 at Wupper-
tol Townhall in Germany.
Mingus sessions were known to vary
widely in quality, probably due to the
very improvisational format he en-
couraged. The tracks presented on .
Mingus In Europe II, however, are con-
sistently enjoyable, with all the em-
pathy of a live performance intact.
The record revolves around the single
Mingus original composition, an exten-
ded (17-minute) and multifaceted en-
deavor curiously entitled "Orange Was
the Colour of Her Dress Then Blue
Silk." Dolphy's sax weavings are per-
fectly played out and played behind,
setting the stage for the shorter Mingus
bass solo cover of "Sophisticated
Lady" which follows "Orange.. ." I
must say I couldn't recognize more
than a trace of the Ellington original,
but it's fine stuff, nonetheless.
,The flip side features a Byard tribute
to Art Tatum and Fats Waller called
"AT-FW-YOU" with a distinctively
murky piano sound, as well as a
reference to "Charlemagne" by Cliff

Jordan and his rather playful
saxophone. In classic Mingus fashion,
each member gets something of his own
in, always helped by and helping the en-
tire quintet.
Since Mingus won't be making many
more records, and since Joni Mitchell
just ain't quite the same thing, albums
like these are a welcome treat from a
true jazz legend. --Ben Ticho
Bonnie Hayes-Good
Clean Fun' (Slash )
The Go-Go's, The Waitresses and
others have hit upon a very successful
formula: approaching pop rock's stan-
dard target-guys and dolls-from a
somewhat new (and only sometimes
refreshing) female viewpoint. It's a
slightly sneering and simultaneously
alluring view, one which plays up to the
game (Iknow what boys like . . .
you can trust me), then turns the
game in on itself (Sucker).
Bonnie Hayes and the Wild Combo fit
the mold with their first LP release. In
fact, they may do the Go-Go's one up in
that they tend to take some of their
songs almost "seriously," so that there
are some interesting lyrics and in-
novations thrown in with the dance
flash and pop hooks.
I like Good Clean Fun almost solely
on the strength of one song-a pop gem
called "Shelly's Boyfriend" released
with "Coverage" back in the spring. An
infectious blending of Blondie and
California (with Moon Unit) with lines
like "Girls will be girls/and boys will
be boyfriends," "Shelly" explains to
anyone not already initiated into the
sex/romance routine that "It is not all
that they led us to believe it would
be. "
The other songs, especially those on
the first side ("Girls Like Me," "Dum
Fun"), are all equally innocuous and
highly danceable. Bonnie Hayes on
keyboards and voacls is joined by
brother' Kevin on drums, Hank Man-
ninger on bass, and boyfriend Paul
Davis on an often surprising guitar.
They're all produced by someone
named Steve Savage (I thought he was
a professional wrestler or Canadian
hockey player or something).
Yes, Bonnie Hayes is a bit of fun,
and for an album already a few months

old, it holds up its amusing qualities
quite well. With the combination of
groups like this and X, Los Angeles
must be a hot place to be around. I
wouldn't mind, anyhow. -B. T.
'Lydia Lunch and 13.13'
(Ruby Fruit)
It's amazing. Lydia Lunch, singer
and scene-stealer, is back again, this
time with a new band called 13.13, and
an album on doom and gloom indepen-
dent Ruby Fruit.
Best known for her work with New
York's eclectic and exciting Eight Eyed
Spy, Lydia certainly puts the supply
and demand axiom to the test. Although
she has been involved with some very
worthwhile projects over the past five
, years, she has yet to work with a band
or on an album with the faintest com-
mercial potential. And then there were
some projects which were, well, a little
less worthwhile.
13.13 is a departure of sorts for Lun-
ch. With Eigh't Eyed Spy, Lydia came
off as a brash bitch of a woman, trying
to "maintain her cool"-with
questionable success. She always soun-
ded as if she was about to belt someone,
creating an image both endearing and
abrasive, one which she played up to
the hilt. Beyond image, she did and still
does have a way of delivering a line for
maximum (mostly comedic) effect.
She's swimming in different waters
with 13.13, but with a similar stroke.
Soundwise, 13.13 is definitely on the
psychedelic side of the street. The eight
songs on this well-crafted disc are
loosely structured pieces, heavy on,
rhythm, short on melody. All in-
struments are melded into a muddy
mix with lots of shrill guitar bits and
plenty of feedback. Lydia, who doesn't.
sound quite as sure and scrappy as she
once did, tosses lyrics off above the din
in a pained and well-measured
monotone. If you can imagine Public
Image doing Black Sabbath covers,
you're halfway there.
All in all, the album holds-its own in
pop music's psychedelic sweepstakes.
It's a bit unrelenting in outlook and at
times very pretentious, but ultimately
salvaged by moments of beauty and
elegance onathe skids. Yes, another
Lydia Lunch album.
-.ames Stasko wski

A Clockwork Orange
(Stanley Kubrick,1971)
Kubrick's horrifying glimpse at the
not so distant future stars Malcolm
McDowell as an incorrigable
deliquent who, after his eventual
arrest, is subjected to an experiment
in conformity. The film asks a lot of
questions about society and in-
dividualism but wallows too much in
loud, beating-over-the-head plotting.
Still, this might be your only chance
to see gang fights choreographed to
Rossiili and sex to the William Tell
Overture. (Friday, September 10;
Michigan Theatre, 4:00, 7:00, 9:30).
Campus
F il ms
M*A*S*H
(Robert Altman, 1970)
"Attention. Tonight's movie will be
M*A*S*H. Follow the zany antics of
our combat surgeons as they cut and
stitch their way along the front lines.
Operating as bombs and bullets bur-
st around them. Snatching laughs
and love between amputations and
penicillin. Follow Hawkeye, Trap-
per, Duke, Dago Red, Painless,
Radar, and Hot Lips as they put our
boys back together again. Starring
Elliot Gould, Donald Sutherland,
Tom Skerritt, Sally Kellerman,
Robert Duvall, Jo An Pflug, Gary
Burghoff, and John Schuck. 'God-
damn Army!' That is all." (Satur-
day, September 11; Lorch Hall, 7:00,
9:15).
Stripes
(Ivan Reitman, 1981)
Bill Murray and Harold Ramis star
in the cinematic antidote to An Of-
ficer and a Gentleman. Besieged by
big city problems, our heroes decide

to join the army. With John Candy as
Private Ox and Warren Oates as the
obligatory hard-nose drill instruc-
tor, this isn't just a movie-it's an
adventure. (Saturday, September
11; Auditorium A,7:00, 9:00).
My Fair Lady
(George Cukor, 1964)
Rex Harrison and Audrey Hepburn
made movie history as Professor
Higgins and Eliza Doolittle in this
classic adaptation of George Ber-
nard Shaw's Pygmalion. But the
film drags on for almost three hours
and practically ignores the romance
between the two leads so the final
scenes of the film make little sense.
(Sunday, September 12; Lorch Hall,
6:00,9:00).

R

The Beatles

Yellow Submarine
(George Dunning, 1968)
Classic Beatle tunes surround the
quintessential rock cartoon. Watch
the animated equivalents of John,
George, Paul, and Ringo cavort in a
Yellow Submarine attempting to
free Pepperland from the evil,
nasty, belligerent, Blue Meanies.
Yeah for the good guys. Fabulous
soundtrack. (Monday, September
13; Michigan Theatre, 7:00, 9:00).

I.
I

Paley retires as
chairman of CBS

BOUFFANT Hair Fashion
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Bryan Bowers performs at the Ark on Monday, September 13.

Clubs/Bars
the Ark (1421 Hill; 761-1451)
Returning to the Ark for a Satur-
day night show, country
$inger/songwriter/husband-and-wife-
team Jim Ringer and Mary Mc-
Caslin perform originals and inter-
Th at's
E ttaain me .t.
pretive covers (varying from the
Beatles to Sam Cooke) starting at 9
p.m. Popular, humorour, and
romantic material. Monday, Brian
Bowers dazzles the mind with his
virtuoso performance on the
autoharp.
Rick's American Cafe (611 Church;
996-274)
Tonight and tomorrow night the
fine reggae of the Tony Brown Band
plays Rick's. Recommended.
Joe's Star Lounge (109 N. Main;
665-DOES)
"Walk Right In" with the Blue
Front Persuaders, one of the more
proficient of Ann Arbor's legion

R&B groups. Good sax work.
Tonightand tomorrow night.
The Blind Pig (208 S. First; 996-
8555) ,1
Former Vipers member and
favorite son blues roots man Steve
Nardella brings his able ensemble
back to town tonight and tomorrow
night.
Mr. Flood's Party (120 W. Liberty;
995-2132)
Another appearance by Chidago
Pete and the Detroiters; this sextet
won't disappoint soul and R&B fans.
Friday and Saturday nights.
tSecond Chance (516 E. Liberty;
994-5350)
Squeeze ontortheBChancedance
floor with Dr. Bop and the
Headliners all weekend long. Ina
Anka takes the vocals on '60s covers
and dance numbers.
Concerts
Eclipse Jazz/WIQB Summer Con-
cert (Palmer Field; 763-5924)
Make the short trip out to Palmer
Field (near the CCRB) for the last in
this series featuring local talent.
Starting at noon, you can catch all
the R&B and stright-ahead R&B you
can handle with Dick Siegel and the
Ministers of Melody, the Urbations,
Nucleus, Funksh'n (funk), and
Storm Legacy (reggae). Free,

NEW YORK (AP)- William Paley,
who founded CBS in 1928 and turned it
into one of the most powerful and
profitable broadcast empires, announ-
ced Wednesday he will retire as chair-
man of the board of CBS next April to
become a partner in the Whitcom In-
vestment Co.
Paley, 81, will be replaced by Thomas
Wyman, who will add chairman to his
other positions as president and chief
executive officer. Paley will continue
on the board of directors and serve as a
consultant to CBS.
In a letter to CBS employees and its
affiliated stations, Paley said: "In
resigning as board chairman, I am
reflecting my complete confidence in
Tom Wyman and his skilled, dedicated
management team . . . I feel the time
has come for me to relinquish a full-
time commitment. Fortunately, my
energy level remains high, and I want
to stay reasonably active."
Whitcom Investment is a private par-
tnership that owns Whitney Com-

munications Corp., part owner of ,the
international Herald Tribune
newspaper.
During Paley's stewardship, CBS
became recognized as a broadly
popular mass entertainment medium.
At the same time, CBS guarded
zealously its news purity and gained a
reputation for excellence that was em-
bodied by Edward R. Murrow and
passed on to Walter Cronkite.
"Quite early in the game," Paley
wrote in his autobiography, "I had
evaluated the essential elements of
broadcasting and come to believe that
the crux of this business was program-
ming . . . what went on the air, it
seemed logical to me that those who put
on the most appealing shows won the
widest audiences."
"He was not a programing gambler,"
said Michael H. Dann, head of
programing for CBS from 1958-70.
"He'd pay anything for a star, but he
wasn't the least bit interested in
creating new forms. He believed in
building the best mousetrap."

a- mmoop,

i

EARL KLUGH,

edClpse

L

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 25
8:00p.m.
HILL AUDITORIUM, Ann Arbor
TICKETS: $8.50, 7.50, 6.50 Reserved
GOOD SEATS STILL AVAILABLE

fa111982'

1

JOHNNY
I SATU RDA

GRIFFIN.)

Y, OCTOBER 9

TWO SHOWS-8:00 and 10:30 p.m.
UNIVERSITY CLUB, Ann Arbor
TICKETS: $6.50 General Admission

Dance Theatre Studio
711 N. University (near State St.), Ann Arbor * 995-4242
co-directors: Christopher Watson & Kathleen Smith
day, evening and weekend classes
new classes beginning Sept. 13

GATEWAY TRIOD
JOHN ABERCROMBIE, JACK DeJOHNEITE, DAVID HOLLAND
TWO SHOWS-8:00 and 10:30 p.m.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 23
UNIVERSITY CLUB, Ann Arbor
TICKETS: $6.50 General Admission
WENDELL HA R R ISON
with Special Guest LEON THOMAS
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 6
8:00 p. m.
UNIVERSITY CLUB, Ann Arbor
TICKETS: $5.00 Advance, $6.00 at Door

NOTICE TO ALL PERFORMERS
* SINGERS * ACTORS * DANCERS
Attend the Mass Meeting for
flESRT SONG

ART ENSEMBLE A
GREAT BLACK MUSIC
ANCIENT TO THE FUTURE"
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20
TWO SHWS-8:00 and 10:30 p.m.
MICHIGAN UNION BALLROOM
TICKETS: $8.50General Admission
DAVI DEYGES )

)

,:

I

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