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November 20, 1982 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-11-20

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Page 2-Saturday, November 20, 1982-The Michigan Daily

Walesa's
friends
deny sex
scandal
rumors
WARSAW, Poland (AP)- Lech
Walesa's wife, parish priest and friends
vigorously defended him yesterday
against allegations that the martial law
regime had tapes and photos showing
him in "sexually compromising
situations."
Walesa's wife Danuta said she was
not surprised by the accusation and
asserted "I do not believe it will suc-
ceed."
WALESA'S family priest, the Rev.
Henryk Jankowski, commented, "He
(Walesa) is not afraid. He is a clean
man."
A spokesman for the Solidarity chief
said that Walesa had anticipated the
allegations. "He has taken into account
the possibility of an imminent attack
over many months when charges were
leveled against union activists."
Solidarity, the first independent
union in the Soviet bloc, was founded in
Gdansk in August 1980, suspended when
martial law was imposed last Dec. 13
and outlawed Oct. 8.
NBC-TV's "Nightly News" reported
Thursday that security agents had
shown pictures and tape recordings of
Walesa in "sexually compromising
situations" to church officials, along
with documents contending financial
irregularities.
THE MATERIALS, the report said,
dated from before the imposition of
martial law and may have been aimed
at discrediting Walesa if he sought to
assume a public role after being freed
from 11 months of internment Satur-
day.
A spokesman for the Interior
Ministry, asked about the NBC report,
said it was made up. "I know nothing of
such plans," he said.

Daily Photo by DAN COVEN
.Rosebowl bound
This miniature train, the Pasadena Express, prepares for the trip to the Rosebowl as it circles the tracks in the window
of Dascola's Barbershop, 615 E. Liberty.
Economico orecast may be inaccurate

(continued from Page 1)
I agan' administration's tax-cut
pgogram last year.
r"WE HAD A situation in which the
gOvernment told people that despite the
6&~ cuts and the increase in defense
spending, the budget would balance,"
said Hymans.
In spite of these claims, Hymans
4aid, most economists maintained that
e budget couldn't possible balance.
he financial markets, on the other
hand, were slow to see the deficits the
4conomists were predicting.
By the end of last year, he said, the
aond markets realized there would be
4normous deficits in the future, which
would result in extremely high interest
rates.
RESPONDING to this, interest rates
Rabbi to give
talk Monday
despite UAC
cancellation

started rising early this year, choking
off the predicted recovery.
Despite the inaccuracy of last year's
predictions, the University forecast -
long with Chase Econometrics, Whar-
ton, and Data Resourceds Incorporated
are generally considered one of four
most respected forecasts of its type -
continues to be influential among
national and regional economists, as
shown by the large numb'er of par-
ticipants attracted to this year's con-
ference from the private, public and
academic sectors.
"The forecast gives us some idea of
what the business climate will be like
for the next 12 to 18 months," said
Leslie -Koska, an economist with a
Detroit-based bank. "It gives our
decision-makers some ideas of what

type of loans to issue, and in what areas
to allocate our resources.
OTHER participants attended for
other reasons. "The forecast brings up
the question of exactly what role the
legislature plays in the performance of
the economy," said Steve Stanley, a
member of the state senate's
Republican staff.
Stanley added that in his view, the
forecast shows that the state's economy
follows the national economy, rather
than the directives of the state's elected
officials.
'They (the forecasts) are influen-
tial," said Hymans, "especially if they
are saying the same thing. They are
major inputs in the policy-making
decisions in Washington."

(Continued from Page 1)
University students, according to Ron
Glassman, one of the students. The
topic will be "Never Again: A Program
for Jewish Survival."
Michael Drissman, another member
of Jewish Idea, said UAC's cancellation
of the lecture was nothing new to
Kahane. "He is, of course, controver-
sial;" Drissman said.
Kahane has been barred from en-
tering both Canada and Great Britain
on speaking engagements within the
past year, Drissman said. Kahane is

now in a legal battle with the Southfield
Civic Center, which, like UAC, has
decided to dis-invite Kahane from
speaking, according to Drissman.
MOST OF the groups that have op-
posed Kahane's speaking engagements
have been "liberal-type Jews,"
Drissman said. It was Steve Belkin of
the Union of Students for Israel and
Michael Brooks, director of Hillel who
informed UAC's executive committee
of Kahane's radical views.
Both explained that they didn't object
to Kahane's right to speak, but thought

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Lending rate lowered to 9%
WASHINGTON- The Federal Reserve Board said yesterday it is
lowering its own lending rate to banks from 9.5 percent to 9 percent, the
lowest in four years. The move could prompt new declines in commercial in-
terest rates.
The cut in the "discount" rate that the nation's central back charges
commercial banks and other financial institutions is the first since early Oc-
tober and sixth since mid-July, when the rate stood at 12 percent. Each of the
cuts has been by one-half percentage point.
The latest action, approved 6-0 with one member absent, takes effect Mon-
day. It brings the key lending rate to its lowest point since Nov. 1, 1978, when
it was raised from 81%2 percent to 912 percent.
The decline in the discount rate since the summer parallels similar drops
in both short-term and long-term interest rates. The central bank said it is
lowering its rates in response to declines in market rates, but many
economists contend just the opposite: that the Fed is moving aggressively to
force market rates down.
Birth control researcher dies
SEATTLE- Dr. Carl Heller, who helped develop the birth control pill, is
dead at age 68 after years of illness.
Heller, who died at his home near Poulsho last Friday, had been bedridden
since he suffered a stroke 11 years ago.
Heller and two other researchers spent more than 10 years working on the
contraceptive pill which was approved by the Food and Drug Administration
in 1962.
Heller gained recognition in 1939 and 1940 for research into the cause of
menopause, and for outlining treatment to alleviate the symptoms. He also
helped define the field of endocrinology, and did research on giantism and
dwarfism in humans.
Heller also devised methods to measure hormones in urine, helped develop
a system using radioactivity to measure the time it takes sperm cells to
mature, and developed a male birth control pill. The latter was not marketed
because of serious side effects, including heart irregularity.
Steelworkers reject
concessions contract
PITTSBURGH- The United Steelworkers union yesterday rejected a
concessions contract slashing wages but boosting jobless benefits-the
second time this year the depressed industry has failed to win the cuts it says
are needed for survival.
The USW's bargaining policy body, the 600-member Basic Steel Industry
Conference, voted 231-141 to reject a 45-month contract calling for pay cuts
averaging $1.50 an hour-about 10 percent of the basic industry wage.
The plan also called for a 75-cent-an-hour deduction to aid laid-off workers
and would have tied future cost-of-living increases to restored profitability
among steelmakers weathering their worst slump since the Depression.
Not far from union headquarters, in Midland, Pennsylvania, the USW also
distributed four thousand Thanksgiving turkeys to union members who lost
their jobs when their plant closed last month.
The turkeys were purchased with $37,000 donated by the local. The money
was accumulated when the workers gave up two cost-of-living raises totaling
12 cents an hour. The money was set aside as a possible contract concession
to the company, but it was never used.
King wins palimony suit
LOS ANGELES- A judge Friday threw out a palimony suit filed against
Billy Jean King by her lesbian former lover who claimed the tennis star
promised to support her for life.
In the first phase of the sensational suit last year, Marilyn Barnett, a for-
mer hairdresser who became a traveling companion and secretary to Mrs.
King, said she was evicted from the beach house they once shared.
Shortly after the suit was filed, Mrs. King publicly admitted she and Miss
Barnett had a lesbian relationship.
Miss Barnett claimed in her suit filed in April 1981 that Mrs. King had
promised to give her the Malibu beach house owned by the Kings and
lifetime support.
Superior Court Judge Sarah Radin ruled yesterday that Miss Barnett had
no case against Mrs. King and her husband, sports entrepreneur Larry King.
The only issue still pending in the case is an injunction prohibiting Miss
Barnett from releasing about 100 love letters written by Mrs. King during,
their affair. Attorney Dennis Wasser said the Kings plan no action concer-
ning the letters beyond the injunction.
Iraqis disillusionedwith war
Western and Asian diplomats say most Iraqis, including.the senior gover-
nment leadership, are tired of the war-which began in September 1980
when Iraqi troops attacked across the disputed Shatt-al-Arab waterway.
Last June, Iraq's Revolutionary Command Council announced that Iraqi
troops had left Iranian territory and were ready to end the conflict. But
Iranian leader Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini vowed to continue the struggle
until Iraqi President Saddam Hussein and his Arab Baath Socialist Party
fell.
Western diplomats feel the war will drag on until Iran decides it is ready to
allow mediation of a settlement.
"People are tired of the war from the top down," said one senior diplomat,
who asked not to be identified. "Every family has someone either at the

front, or dead or wounded."
It is in this sense of personal loss and sacrifice that the average Iraqi has
felt the war most acutely.
Although reliable casualty figures are hard to come by, foreign diplomats
estimate Iraq has lost between 30,000 and 60,000 dead and 50,000 captured.
Vol. XCIII, No. 63
Saturday, November 20, 1982
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
scription rates: $13 September through April (2 semesters); $14 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday mor-
nings. Subscription rates: $7.50 in Ann Arbor; $8 by mail outside Ann Arbor.
Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER: Send
address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY. 420 Maynard Street, Ann Ar-
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The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to
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dicate and Field Enterprises Newspaper Syndicate.
News room (313) 764-0552, 76-DAILY. Sports desk,763-03759; Circulation,
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it was inappropriate for UAC to provide
a forum for Kahane.
The last time Kahane appeared on
campus was in 1980, when he spoke for
the same group who barred him this
year, UAC's Viewpoint Lectures. That
engagement sparked a mild protest,
but Glassman said he expected no
protests this time. "We hope people do
come and ask questions, though," he
said.

Storeowne rs
board up
(Continued from Page 1)

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Wishtenaw Ave., 662-4466
(between S. University and Hill)
Campus/Career Fellowship
Coordinator: Steve Spina
Sunday a.m.
Sunday 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Coffee Hour-10:30 social hall
Issues Class-11:00 a.m., French
Room
Wednesday p.m.
8:00-Allelous (Christian Fellow-
ships), French Room
8:30-Study/Discussion Groups
9:30-Holy Communion, sanctuary
* * *
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS
FOUNDATION
502 East Huron, 663-9376
Jitsuo Morikawa, Pastor
10:00 a.m. Sunday Worship. Child
care provided.
Nov. 21-"Privilege and Pain of Pow-
er. "-Jitsuo Morikawa.
11:00 a.m.-Church School. Classes
for all ages. Class for undergraduates.
Class for graduates and faculty.
Also:
Choir Thursday 7:15 p.m., John Reed,
director; Janice Beck, organist.
Student Study Group Wed. at 6:00
p.m.
Ministry Assistants: Marlene Francis,
Terry.ing, Barbara Griffen, Jerry
Rees.

CREATION SCIENCE MEETING
Angell Hall, Room 229
Every Thursday Night-7:00 p.m.
All are welcome. "Let there
light."

be

ST. MARY'S
STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557 t
Weekly Masses:
Mon.-Wed.-5:10 p.m.
Thurs.-Fri.-12:10 p.m.
Sat.-7:00 p.m.
Sun.-8:30 and 10:30 a.m. (Upstairs
and downstairs)
12 noon and 5 p.m. (upstairs and
downstairs)
North Campus Mass at 9:30 a.m. in
Bursley Hall (Fall and Winter Terms)
Rite of Reconciliation-4 p.m.-5 p.m.
on Friday only; any other time by
appointment.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
A Campus Ministry of the
Christian Reformed Church
Reverend Don Postema
10:00 a.m. Service of Holy Com-
munion.
Morning Sermon-"Thanksgiving."
Evening Sermon-"Eucharist."
6:00 p.m. Evening Worship.
Wednesday, 10:00 p.m. Evening
Prayers

NEW GRACE APOSTOLIC CHURCH
632 N. Fourth Ave.
Rev. Avery Dumas Jr., Pastor
9:45 a.m. Sunday School.
11:45 Morning Worship
7:00 p.m. Evening Service
Bible Study-Wed. & Fri. 7 p.m.
For rides call 761-1530
* * *
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
120 S. State St.
(Corner of State and Huron)
Worship Schedule:
Nov, 21-"So Who Needs a Shep-
herd?"-Dr. Donald B. Strobe.
Church School for all ages-9:30 a.m.
and 11:00 a.m.
Choir Rehearsal-Thursday at
7:15 p.m.
Ministers:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Rev. Fred B. Maitland
Dr. Gerald R. Parker
Education Directors:
Rose McLean and Carol Bennington
* * *
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
(The Campus Ministry
of the LCA-ALC-AELC)
Galen Hora, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
Sunday Worship at 10:30 a.m.
Mon. 1-2 p.m., Bible Study, Room 5
Michigan League.
Wed. 7:30 p.m. Choir.

had settled their pay dispute yesterday,
40 members of Columbus' University
Area Business Association
unanimously voted to "protect our
businesses, employees, and customers,
in whatever ways possible," said
Association President Nick Per-
truzella.
THIS YEAR, police have asked cam-
pus-area bars and liquor stores not to
sell bottled beverages, and most High
Street bars have complied.
"This year we're not going to sell bot-
tles to go," said Noseworthy. "They've
caused problems before, so we're
going to have all plastic cups."
Local carry-out establishments,
however, have proved more of a
problem for law enforcement officials.
"I assume we're going to sell bot-
tles," said Mike DiCarlo, an employee
at Staten's Carryout. "I know if
someone gives me two dollars, I'll give
a six pack of bottles."_
FAST STEREO SERVICE
TV RENTALS
USED EQUIPMENT
HI FI STUDIO
215 S. ASHLEY
DOWNTOWN I BLOCK WEST OF MAIN
% BLOCK NORTH OF LIBERTY
769-0392 or 668-7492
Dear Merchant.
Did you know
that Daily
readers spend
over $125
million on

SHORTWAY BUS TOURS

Thanksgiving
Nov. 24-28
Kalamazoo
Gary, IA
Chicago

November 20-21
Round Trip Transportation
from The Michigan Union
to Columbus, Ohio.

Editor-in chief
Managing Editor
News Editor
Student Affairs Editor
University Editor
Opinion Page Editors
Arts Magazine Editor
Associate Arts Magazine Editor
Sports Editor
Associate Sports Editors
Photogrophy Editor.

DAVID MEYER
PAMELA KRAMER
ANDREW CHAPMAN
ANN MARIE FAZIO
MARK GINDIN
JULIE HINDS
CHARLES THOMSON
RICHARD CAMPBELL
BEN TICHO
BOB WOJNOWSKI
BARB BARKER
LARRY FREED
JOHN KERR
RON POLLACK
BRIAN MASCK

Joe Ewing. Paul Helgren. Steve Hunter, Chuck Joffe,,
Robin Kopilnick. Doug Levy, Tim Makinen. Mike
McGraw, Larry Mishkin. Lisa Noferi. Rob Pollard, Dan
Price, Jeff Quicksilver, Paul Resnick, Wendy Rocho,
Lenny Rasenb- urn. Scott Solowich, John Tayer, Judy
Walton, Karl Wheatley, Chu~ck Whitman, Rich Wiener.
Steve Wise. BUSINESS
Business Manager JOSEPH G BRODA
Sales Manager KATHRYN HENDRICK
Display Manager ANN SACHAR
Finance Manager .n SAM G SLAUGHTER IV
Assistant Display Manager .. .. PAMELA GOULD
Operations National Manager ...LINDSAY BRAY
Circulation Manager KIM WOOD
Sales Coordinator . E ANDREW PETERSEN
Cified Mta ~nager PAM G ILERY

r
a

One Night accomodations'

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