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November 11, 1982 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-11-11

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The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, November 11, 1982-Page 3

Rumors indicate Brezhnev may be dead

From AP and UPI
MOSCOW - Soviet television broad-
cast somber music in place of regularly
;scheduled entertainment programs
yesterday, setting off rumors about the
possible death of a Communist Party
leader.
Recent reports have raised questions
"about the health of both President
teonid Brezhnev, 75, and Politburo
member Andrei Kirilenko, 75.
In Washington, U.S. officials, who
requested anonymity, said they were
aware of "a lot of rumors in Moscow"
that Brezhnev had died but had been
unable to confirm them.
Officials assigned to the Soviet desk
at the State Department said they had
received no reports from the U.S. Em-

bassy in Moscow that Breshnev had
died.
Standard procedure in the case of the
death of a Politburo member is to wait
a day or two before announcing it. This
is to decide how the news will be
presented and agree on arrangements
for the funeral.
Brezhnev was last seen Sunday when
he took part in celebrations marking the
65th anniversary of the Bolshevik
Revolution. Kirilenko was absent from
the celebrations, as was a third aging
Soviet leader, Arvid Pelshe, 83, a
veteran of the Revolution who served as
head of the party Control Commission.
Soviet officials were not available for
comment.
The local television channel in

Moscow replaced a hockey game With a
somber piano concert.
In the past, announcement of deaths
of important persons have been
preceded by mourning music. The
rumors began after a 7:30 p.m. concert
in honor of Soviet police was replaced
with a patriotic film about Vladimir
Lenin, founder of the Soviet state.
There was no explanation for the
change.
In addition, the rumors were fueled
by the apparent absence of,Brezhnev's
signature on a message to Angolan
President Jose Eduardo Dos Santos on
the seventh anniversary of that coun-
try's independence. Last year's
message carried Brezhnev's signature.
The main news program"Vremya"
and two editions of "Today in the
World" - dedicated to international
news - concluded their programs
without any indication on the health of
Soviet officials.

Brezhnev, at the Sunday celebration,
was muffled in a scarf, fur hat, heavy
coat and gloves. He returned the
salutes of passing marchers and waved
at the civilian procession that followed
the troops.
Kirilenko, 76, a 20-year veteran of the
Communist Party's ruling body, was
once considered a leading candidate to
replace Brezhnev. But he was not seen
at a Kremlin fete Friday evening and
his portrait was missing from
decorations for the anniversary parade
in Red Square - adding to speculation he
had resigned or was ousted from the
ruling Politburo.
With no clear successor to Breshnev
in line, Kremlin-watchers said they ex-
pect Brezhnev aide Konstantin Cher-
nenko or ex-KGB chief Yuri Andropov -
now a party secretary with respon-
sibility for ideology - would take over as
interim leader if Brezhnev died or was
incapacitated.

Noon Luncheon
Soup and Salad $1
Friday, Nov. 12
Shirley Lewis
Ecumenical Center; "Journey to
China'-A slide presentation.
Guild House 802 Monroe
Join the
Daily Sports Staff
iI1 j21
V N j[4'Q
1 ' a a(

-HAPPENINGS
Highlight
The Music at Mid-Day Series will present Viola da gamba music, music of
the 17th century today at noon by Laura Goldblatt and Jill Feldstein. The
performancewill be in the Michigan Union's Anderson Room.
Films
Cinema Guild-The 39 Steps, 7, 10 p.m.; Destiny, 8:30 p.m., Lorch.
Women's Studies-Nobody's Victim, noon; Workplace Hustle, noon,
Angell Aud. C.
AAFC-The Time Machine, 7 p.m.; Forbidden Planet, 9 p.m., Angell Aud.
A.
CFT-Cousin, Cousine, 7, 10:30 p.m.; Bread and Chocolate, 8:40 p.m.,
Michigan Theatre. .
Public Health-Noontime Film Fest, The Right to Die, 12:05 p.m., SPH II
Aud.
Performances
School of Music-String Department Recital, 8 p.m., Recital Hall; Trum-
pet Recital, Donald Miles, 8 p.m., Rackham Assembly Hall. F
Theatre & Drama-"The Trojan Women," 8 p.m., New Trueblood Arena.
Eclippe-Jam Session, U-Club.
Ark-Na Caberfe, Celtic music with highland pipes and drums, 9 p.m.,
1421 Hill St.
Speakers
Atmos. & Oceanic Sci.-Margaret S. Leinen, "What Caused Climate &
Ocean Changes During Pleistocene Ice Ages?" 3:30 p.m., 2233 Space Res.
Biological Sciences-Developmental Biology & Genetics Sem., Peter
Kaufman, "Gravitropic Receptors & Responses in Plants," noon, 1139 Nat.
Sci.
Vision/Hearing-Reto Weiler, "Light Induced Changes in the Photorecep-
tor-Horizontal Cell Connectivity Pattern," 12:15 p.m., 2055 MHRI.
Communication-Jerome Johnston, "Television to Enhance Children's
Coping Skills," 1 p.m., 1035 Frieze.
Chemistry-Robert Martin, "The Role of NRC in Nuclear Safety," 4 p.m.,
1200 Chem.
Computing Ctr.-Chalk Talk, CC Consulting Staff, "Magnetic Tapes (II),"
12:10 p.m., 1011 NUBS; Mark Hersey, "Apple Microcomputer & MTS," 3:30
p.m., 171 BSAD; registration required.
Women Engineers-Kathy Littleton, "Politics in the Work World," 6:30
p.m., 229W. Eng.
Program in Judaic Studies-Maya Tavori, "The Law and the Consumer in
Israel," noon, League Conf. Rms. 4 & 5.
MHRI- Jerome Frank, "Psychotherapy: A Cure for Which There is No
Disease?" 3:45 p.m., 1057 MHRL.
Museum of Art-Art Break, Maria Haidler, 18th Century English Chest,
12:10 p.m., Museum of Art.
Environmental & Ind. Health-Ronald Barnes, "Acid Rain: Causes, Con-
sequences, Cures & Costs," 10 a.m., SPH-I, Vaughn Aud.; Discussion, noon,
SPH-I Fac. Lounge.
CREES-Abraham Brumberg, "Solidarity," 8 p.m., 200 Lane Hall.
Veteran's Administration-Reuben Swisher, awarded Bronze Star, Purple
Heart, and seven other medals during service, Veterans Day Ceremony,
7:30 p.m., VA Medical Center.
English-A.L. Becker, "Meditations (of a Linguist) on an Old Javanese
Tale," 7:30 p.m., Rackham E. Conf. Rm.
Center for Japanese Studies-Michael Browne, "Kawahara Keiga: Por-
traits of Foreigners," noon, Lane Hall Commons Rm.
Meetings
Ann Arbor Libertarian League-7:30 p.m., upstairs, Count of Antipasto.
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship-7 p.m., Union.
Campus Crusade for Christ-7 p.m., 2003 Angell.
Sailing Club-7:45 p.m., 311 W. Eng.
Med. Ctr. Bible Study-12:30 p.m., F223; Mott Children's Hospital.
Aikido Club-5 p.m., Sports Bldg.
Miscellaneous
Scottish Country Dancers-Beginning class, 7 p.m.; Intermediate class, 8
p.m., Union.
League-Int. Night, Russia, 5 p.m., League.
Alpha Phi Omega-Blood drive battle between OSU and UM, donor times
11 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Union Pendleton Rm.
English-Reception for Carolyn Forche, 3 p.m., Hopwood Rm. 1006 Angell.
CRLT-Faculty Instructional Workshop, "Managing Stress," 7 p.m.,
registration required.
Student Wood & Crafts Shop-Advanced Power Tools Safety, 6 p.m., 537
SAB.
African Students Assoc., MSA, Trotter House-Symposium, "African
Development: Problems & Paradoxes," 7:30 p.m., Union Ballroom.
United Campuses to Prevent Nuclear War-Day-long convocation,
"Solutions to the Nuclear Arms Race," 1-10:30 p.m., Rackham Aud.
Ecology Center-Home Heat Conservation workshop, 7:30 p.m., Leslie
Laboratories' Homestead, 1831 Traver Rd.
WCBN-"You've Got to be Modernistic," Hoagy Carmichael, 88.3 FM.

Brezhner
... feared dead

______________ II ~ El I - k

LEED 83 pushesfor
better communication

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ENDS TONIGHT!

By ROB FRANK
It has been said that some are born to
power, some acquire it, and some have
it thrust upon them. If this adage is
true, LSA-SG presidential candidate
Barry Powers is in the final category.
Powers, running on the newly formed
Legislative Efficiency for our
Educational Demands 83 slate, claims
the seven other members of LEED 83
drafted him as their candidate.
"The slate asked me to run right
around Halloween," said Powers, a
recent transfer from Wayne State
University. "I spoke with them, and we
agreed I would probably be most effec-
tive as president."
Powers first joined LSA-SG when it
had an open seat last September. He
said that since that time, he has
brought to the assembly a point of view
not shared by many of its other mem-
bers. "I'm usually the lone dissenter,".
he said.
LSA-S G
ELECTIONS
Powers emphasized that his biggest
concern for next year is increasing
student participation in LSA and in
student government. "Most people
don't have an investment of time in this
college," he said.
"If students, instead of going to the
bar three nights a week, went to the bar
only two nights and used the other to get
involved in something that interests
them, student government would be
much more effective."
Also, he said, while LSA-SG has
traditionally invested much of its time
and effort in lobbying for movements
like the nuclear freeze, Powers says"he
would like to see the assembly's money
go to more tangible projects. "With that
amount of money (about $10,000 a year)
we should be able to do'some things that
are really spectacular.''
According to Powers, LSA-SG should
redirect its efforts toward the concerns
of the college. "I feel college gover-
nment should remove itself from the
state and local level governments," he
said. "The government should be

"CHAN IS MISSING" AT-6:40, 8:30, 10:20
. DISCOVER A NEW
WAY TO FALL IN
- LOVE!
l''~ 1% 4 0

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;

pet onals

(Pd)

FRI-6:40, 8:30, 10:20
SAT, SUN-1:10, 3:00, 4:50, 6:40, 8:30, 10:20

I

Powers
... 'We have to be selfish'
specialized to LSA-SG. We have to be
selfish."
The presidential candidate said he
would try to increase contact with the
faculty and administration if elected.
"We've got to try to cooperate with
them, they ought to respect us," he
said.
Other ideas suggested by Powers in-
clude additional freshman seminars, a
speaker and lecture series for LSA
students, and more "academic-
related"activities.
Although Powers said he expects to
win the election with vice presidential
candidate Mark Greenleaf, he is not en-
thusiastic about the overall effect of his
election. "My getting in or someone
else getting in is not going to make
anyone's life in LSA fantastic or shit-
ty," he said.

THE FILM THAT "LIFTS YOU UP WHERE YOU
BELONG" now has the No. 1 HIT SINGLE IN THE COUNTRY
DEBRA AN FFICR RICHARD
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THURS, FRI-7:10, 9:20 (R)
SAT, SUN-12:40, 2:50, 5:00, 7:10, 9:20
OPEN AAUP CHAPTER MEETINO
Friday, Nov. 12 at Noon
Michigan Room in Michigan League
Speaker: PROFESSOR VICTOR STONE
(Law, University of Illinois)
National President of AAUP
ON
"Pros and Cons of Collective Bargaining at Universities"
THE PROGRAM WILL BEGIN AT 12:30
Those attending may take lunch trays from the cafeteria to the Michigan
Room on the second floor: The program will begin at 12:30.
mmm m~ - - - - - --- - - - - - - -
Please check as appropriate
k wish to receive the AAUP Newsletter and enclose a donation of $
(checks made out to U-M Chapter of AAUP)
I wish to join AAUP. Please send information. Mail to W. Kaplan,
Math., 347 W. Eng.
CALL 995-9107 for AAUP help
CAnnouncing Marty
EIGHTH ANNUAL
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V ,,
by Euripides
translated by Neil Curry
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the Mchigan League,
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Deportrent of Theatre
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. ----_

Ao

To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI. 48109.

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