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November 10, 1982 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-11-10

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Page 2-Wednesday, November 10,
Afghan
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (AP) - Up
to 2,700 civilians and Soviet soldiers
died from asphyxiation in a car-filled
mountain tunnel last week in
Afghanistan, Western diplomatic sour-
ces reported yesterday. The sources
said the soldiers had sealed off the tun-
nel after a fiery auto crash, apparently
fearing they were under rebel attack.
Neither the Marxist Afghan regime
nor the Soviet Union, which sent troops
to Afghanistan in 1979, have commen-
ted on the reports.
BODIES WERE still being flown from
the area one week after the disaster,
the sources said, briefing reporters
here on the condition they not be iden-
tified by name or country. They
described Kabul, the capital, as a city
in mourning.
"Whatever the body count, there

1982-The Michigan Daily
tunnel fire kills 2,700

seems to be nobody in Kabul who has
not lost a friend or relative," a source
said.
The sources said there were a
variety of conflicting reports cir-
culating in Kabul about the accident,
believed to have occured on the after-
noon of Nov. 2 or 3. They gave this ac-
count, based on what they considered
the most accurage of the reports:
A COMMERCIAL truck collided
head-on with a fuel tanker in the 1.7-
mile-long Salang Tunnel, about 70 miles
north of Kabul, turning the tunnel into a
blazing inferno. Traffic continued to
enter the tunnel until it was backed up
at both ends.
At that point, Soviet troops - ap-
parently fearing a military action -
blocked up the only means of escape for
those inside. Extreme cold caused

motorists to keep their engines running
to avoid death by freezing. Most of the
deaths were believed caused by
exhaust fumes.
The tunnel's electric ventilator fans
were reported not operating. The tun-
nel, a major gateway for Soviet Union
bound traffic, remained closed to traf-
fic for two days.
Sources said one witness reported
that after the calamity the Soviet of-

ficer whose decision it was to close the
tunnel was publicly berated by a senior
officer. Both men were then taken from
the scene in a Soviet helicopter, the
sources said.
Since then, airplane landings at
Kabul airport each night have in-
creased, fuelling speculation that they
were returning with the dead and in-
jured, sources said.

Study predicts '83 grads
will get fewer job offers

k

te t
to bring th~e news to you--

(Continued from Page 1)
ployment before they get a job, and
even then it may not be in their field, he
said.
SHINGLETON urged seniors to begin
their job search early. "Many students
get so lost in many other projects and
activities that they don't put enough
time into the matter of looking for a
job," he said. "The result is that come
graduation time they are grabbing at

straws.
Underclassmen should analyze the
job market and plan their education ac-
cordingly, he said. He urged students to
ket career oriented experience through
internships and summer employment.
Shingleton and Scheetz surveyed 6,378
prospective employers in government,
business, industry, and education to
gather information for their survey, the
twelfth report of its kind.

AFRICA WEEK -1982
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 10,8 P.M.
MICHIGAN UNION, 2nd Floor BALLROOM
"THE BURNING POLITICAL ISSUES OF AFRICA TODAY"
A Public Lecture by Professor Ali Mozrui
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 7:30 P.M.
MICHIGAN UNION, 2nd Floor BALLROOM
A Symposium: "African development-PROBLEMS AND PARADOXES"
Topics and Participants:
"THE DEVELOPMENT OF INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY IN AFRICA"
Chris Dede, Engineer, SIRC, Inc.
"THE POLITICAL OBSTACLES TO DEVELOPMENT"
Professor Lemuel Johnson '
"EDUCATION AND AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT"
Professor Teshome Wagaw
"AFRICA AND THE WORLD ECONOMY"
Professor Ernest Wilson
Moderator: RAISE JAKPOR
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12
TROTTER HOUSE, 1443 Washtenow
AFRICAN ARTS AND CRAFTS EXHIBITION
1-6:30 P.M. (Some sales possible)
FASHION PARADE-7:30-9 P.M.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 13
TROTTER HOUSE, 1443 Washtenaw
AFRICAN ARTS AND CRAFTS EXHIBITION
1-6:30 P.M. (Some sales possible)
PARTY 9 P.M.-??
COME/DANCE TO AFRICAN MUSIC
Sponsored by
The African Students Association
Michigan Student Assembly

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Poland plans to crush strikese
WARSAW, Poland - Communist Poland's martial law regime vowed to
crush nationwide protest strikes set for today and declared it will do
anything to "ensure peace."
The government seized underground Solidarity radio transmitters and a
printing press yesterday and was reported putting former union activists in-
to "protective custody" or detention for 48 hours.
Warsaw appeared calm, however, and official and unofficial sources in
several other large Polish cities reported no overt police presence on the eve
of the protests.
"We hope all citizens will understand that respect for law and order is i
the interest of state and society," government spokesman Jerzy Urban tol
a news conference. "If it is necessary, the government will use all measures
to ensure peace."
Italy and U.S. sign agreement
to combat organized crime
ROME - Italy and the United States signed two agreements on extradition
and legal assistance yesterday designed to combat organized crime and
drug traffic between the two countries.
"This will help greatly in the struggle against the Mafia, which has hit thi
country so badly," Italian Justice Minister Clelio Darida told reporters aft
signing the treaties with Attorney General William French Smith.
U.S. and Italian officials say Sicily is the largest single source of heroin for
the United States and estimate $560 million a year worth of heroin in
produced in Sicily. They say morphine base is smuggled from the Middle
East to Sicily, where it is refined into heroin. Among other things, the ex-
tradition treaty allows each country to extradite people already serving sen-
tences in the other country.
"They will be given a speedy trial and no longer will the public believe a
criminal can avoid justice in one country by committing an offense in
another," Smith said at a news conference.
The other agreement, called a mutual assistance treaty,allows a U.S.
Italian court to order someone in the other country to be a witness in a trial
Pope pleads for European peace
as assassination plot is thwarted
SANTIAGO DE COMPOSTELA, Spain - In an emotional finale to his 1-
day Spanish trip, Pope John Paul II pleaded yesterday for peace in Euroe
and offered the services of the Roman Catholic Church as mediator between
East and West.
There was no indication he was aware of news reports that a Basque
separatist plot to assassinate him had been uncovered and foiled.
The pope later took off for Italy, ending the first visit by a pontiff to Spain.
He told an airport crowd: "These are the arms of he who blesses you and in-
vokes upon you divine protection, and in a salutation made from affection,
he says to you: Until forever, Spain until forever, land of Mary."
Earlier in the day, against the spectacular background of the cathedral of
Santiago de Compostela, magnet of pilgrims for 11 centuries, the pope war-
ned that Europe faced a crisis of economic, spiritual and political upheaval
and the threat of nuclear holocaust.
Spain's national news agency EFE reported that security authorities
believed they thwarted a plot by Basque separatists to assassinate the pon-
tiff during his visit Saturday to the Basque country of northern Spain.
Vietnam vets lan celebration
WASHINGTON - The shunnediarriors of the United States' longest and
most unpopular war began converging on Washington yesterday for a long-
delayed welcome home from the cold shadow of Vietnam.
The veterans came to the capital city by plane, bus and train. Some hit-
chhiked, the cheapest transportation available to a group that suffers an
unemployment rate about double the national average.
Events beginning today will include a 56-hour candle-light vigil at the
National Cathedral, a parade of 15,000 marchers down Constitution Avenue
and countless "open houses" to reunite comrades-at-arms nearly a decade
after U.S. troops quit fighting in Southeast Asia.
The centerpiece of the belated national embrace -promoted by veterans
themselves- will be the dedication Saturday of the Vietnam Veterans
Memorial, a stark black granite wall inscribed with the names of the 57,939
Americans killed and missing in Vietnam.
Agent Orange study faces delay
WASHINGTON - A scientific panel recommended yesterday that the Vet-
erans Administration revise its plan for studying the health effects of 'Agent
Orange on Vietnam troops and enlist outside experts to conduct the in-
vestigtion.
A committee of the National Research Council said the pilot Agent Oran4
study should be delayed until preliminary results are compiled from an Air
Force Study.
The Air Force is comparing the health of 2,486 "Ranch Hand" participants
-the men who sprayed Agent Orange from planes and sometimes became
doused in it-with Air Force veterans who took no part in the spraying, which
occurred between 1962 and 1970.
The Air Firce said first results of the Ranch Hand study "will be available
in the April-June time period."
The scientific panel said waiting for theAir Force results may sidestep pit-

falls in the far larger ground troop study.
Groups of Vietnam veterans have been pressing for a full investigation in-
to their charges that exposure to the herbicide Agent Orange has caus
cancer, birth defects and other serious physical harm.
0 be Ificbigan UntIly
Vol. XCIII, No. 54
Wednesday, November 10, 1982
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Editor-in-chief ....
Monoging Editor .... .
News Editor ..... . .
Student Affairs Editor
University Editor .....
Opinion Page Editors.

.......DAVID MEYER
.....PAMELA KRAMER
ANDREW CHAPMAN
........ANN MARIE FAZIO

Arts/Magazine Editor .........
Associate Arts/Magazine Editor
Sports Editor................ .
Associate Sports Editors ........

. MARK GINDIN
.... JULIE HINDS
CHARLES THOMSON
RICHARD CAMPBELL
.........BEN TICHO
... BOB WOJNOWSKI
......BARB BARKER
LARRY FREED
JOHN KERR
RON POLLACK

Joe Ewing, Paul Helgren, Steve Hunter, Chuck Jeffe,
Robin Kopilnick, Doug Levy, Tim Makinen, Mike
McGraw, Larry Mishkin, Lisa Noferi, Rob Pollard, )an
Price, Jeff Quicksilver, Paul Resnick, Wendy Rocho,
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Walton, Karl Wheatley, Chuck Whitman, Rich Wiener,
Steve Wise BUSINESS
Business Manager ............. JOSEPH G. BR DA
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- - E i PoorhyEio.......BRAMAC

I * Photogrophy Editor ................. BRIAN MASCK

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