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November 05, 1982 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-11-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


-__ -_

Financial aid
*forms delayed

The Michigan Doily--Friday, November 5, 1981-Page 5
Arroyo found guilty
E!

By GEORGE ADAMS
Students seekingfinancial aid for the
1983-84 academic year will have to wait
longer than expected to get their ap-
plication forms, thanks to a legal battle
between the Department of Education
and a national student group.
The forms, which were scheduled to
be distributed this month to colleges,
high schools, and students, are just
being printed today, which will delay
the distribution date by several months,
according to University and federal of-
ficials.
EDUCATION Secretary Terrel Bell
had ordered the delay, allowing his
department time to wait for a federal
district court in Washington to rule on
the lawsuit, which charges that finan-
cial aid application fees students paid
last year are illegal. Bell last night en-
ded the delay and authorized the prin-
ting of the forms to begin this morning.
The suit was filed by the National
Coalition of Independent College and
University students (NCICUS), who
claim that the Department of
Education illegally allowed students to
pay fees to the private firms who
process the bulk of federal financial aid
forms under a government contract.
According to Thomas Butts, the
S University's Washington represen-
tative, recently adopted amendments
call for a single form for all types of

federal financial aid. Students using
this form are not charged for their ap-
plication.
STUDENTS ARE also permitted to
use forms provided by the College
Board's College Scholarship Service
(CSS) or the American College Testing
Program (ACT), which can be used to
apply for all types of financial aid, But-
ts said.
The Department of Education
estimates that 75 percent of last year's
applicants used the privately supplied
forms, paying fees of up to $6.
Butts and student coalition represen-
tative Miriam Rosenberg said those
private forms once had a box students
could check off if they were applying
for Basic Educational Opportunity
(Pell) Grants. Those students who
checked the box were not charged for
processing.
"On the 82-83 form, instead of in-
cluding other campus-based student aid
l (National Direct Student Loans, Work
Study, and Supplemental Educational
Opportunity Grants) in the check-off
box, they simply eliminated the box
completely," Rosenberg said, thereby
forcing all students to pay the fee.
IN ADDITION, Butts said students
were not informed of the existence of
the free federal government form.
"In 82-83, the government dropped
the box (for exemption from an ap-
. See DISTRIBUTION, Page 6

of setting
(Continued from Page 1)
THE KEY issues in the trial centered
on whether Arroyo was temporarily in-
sane at the time of the fire and whether
he actually intended to destroy the en-
tire building when he set a small fire in
its basement.
Both the prosecution and the defense
produced chemical experts and
psychologists who gave conflicting
testimony about Arroyo's mental
health and about the possible use of ac-
celerants, such as gasoline, to spread
the fire.
In the end, however, Conlin decided

con. blaze
that Arroyo was of sound mind when he
committed both crimes and acted
"willfully and maliciously" in settig
the Economics Building ablaze.
Prosecuting attorney Robert Cooper
said the defense "raised serious
questions during the coursedof the en-
tire trial. The case was difficult to
prosecute from the standpount of the
vigorous defense."
Neslon had equally kind words for
Cooper. "I have nothing but respect for
him. He had a hard case because it was
very disjointed," he said, adding, "I
just didn't like the outcome."

Live for God and His People as a.
Capcwn
a what?
Capuchin Franciscans are a religious
fraternity of men trying to live the Gospel in
the Spirit of Francis of Assisi in today's
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Mother and daughter
Ruth Waalkes grasps the wrists of M.J. Czernik as the two rehearse for the
upcoming "Trojan Women" play in the Frieze Building.

_. - ' nit

Vet kills self in imaginary battle

t 'i. ti? P

SALT SPRINGS, Fla. (AP)- A
Green Beret veteran of the Vietnam
War fought a nighttime battle with an
imaginery enemy in the Ocala National
Forest, wounded a passerby and then
shot , himself to death, officials said
yesterday.
The body of Stanley Erwin Moody, 38,
was found Wednesday night at the base
of a 40-foot flagpole erected to honor his
late father on property owned by his
family in an isolated section of the
forest near Lake George.

HE WAS dressed in combat gear and
camouflage, with his face blackened as
if he were going on nighttime patrol, of-
ficials said. He was armed with a han-
dgun, a shotgun and two rifles.
"He was going through a flashback of
the war, no question," said sheriff's in-
vestigator Leo Smith. "Apparently, he
felt he was being overrun by the Viet
Cong and killed himself rather than be
captured. It's a sad situation."
The wounded man, Donald Larson,
37, was on his way to visit a friend when

he heard gunshots and was hit in the leg
when he went to investigate. He was
reported in good condition yesterday in
an Ocala hospital.
Smith said Moody, who reportedly
spent two tours in Vietnam in the mid-
1960s, had a card in his pocket in-
dicating he had been treated for
seizures in a Gainesville hospital since
his return in 1967. Moody called a friend
in Ocala shortly before the shooting,
"telling him he was in trouble," Smith
said.

s .1 .'

by Euripides
translated by Neil Curry
NbV. 10-13 & 18-20
The New Trueblood Arena
TCKETS: $350 PTP Offein
the Mchigan League,
764-0450

I I

College

Address

I

City State Zip

Daily

Class ifileds

*New director chosen to head up

Michigan J
By HALLE CZECHOWSKI
A new director hasibeen found for the
Michigan Community Theatre Foun-
dation, the group that manages the old
Liberty St. movie theater. The foun-
dation announced that long-time Ann
0Arbor resident Russell Collins beat out
a field of about 50 other candidates for
the job.
Collins,, who is a graduate of the
University, has worked in arts
management for the past two years and
said yesterday that he is eager to begin
his new job of directing the theater's
renovation.
AND, LIKE any good public relations
director, Collins has high praise for the
challenge of his new job and for the 52-
year-old theatre.

Theatre Foundation

Departfment of Theatre
______Bring Results
& Drama ri e u t
Open Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Saturday 9:30 a.m. 'til 5:30 p.m.,
Thursday and Friday 9:30 a.m. 'til 9:00 p.m.

"It's the largest legitimate theatre in
town and through all the dinginess, and
dirt, and lack of proper care, there is
still a warmth that shines through,"
said Collins. "Ann Arbor is a strong

market; it's a small town with big-town
culture."
Collins, 26, replaces Ray Messler,
who quit as the theatre's director last
July.

PETITIONS ARE NOW BEING ACCEPTED
FOR DIRECTORS, MUSIC DIRECTOR, OR DESIGNERS
FOR
Spring '83 Production of
MIKADO
CALL 761-7855 or 663-6802
(University of Michigan Gilbert & Sullivan Society)

GRAND SHETLAND WOOLS
YOUR MISS J WILL LOVE!
Crazy Horse would make the
Dean's List at Oxford with
such classic sweater designs
...beautiful in soft pastel
colors! Sized S-M-L in our
Miss J Shop for young women.
A. All-over diamond pattern in
pink/white or li'lac/white, $45;
B. Traditional argyle in
white/pink/lilac combos, $46.

BECOME
A FAIRCHILD
SCHOLAR

Work

3 days a week

at full salary
Study 2 days a week.
under full fellowship
You are eligible if
you have a B.S.
degree in electrical
engineering, computer

Write or call Prof. Anthony
Ephremides, Director of the
Fairchild Scholars Program,
Electrical Engineering Department,
University of Maryland, College
Park, MD 20742. Phone (301)
454-6199/6845/6871. Preference is
given to U.S. citizens.
Or contact the Fairchild Scholars
Program representative when he
visits your campus:
DATE: Friday, November 12
TIME: 1pm-4pm
PLACE: University of Michigan
Career Planning & Placement

/ A
,. .
.* 9
:.'
{;/
f:.

science, or
field

related

~~'~-4 11IlhIII

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