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October 20, 1982 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-10-20

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Page 8-Wednesday, October 20, 1982-The Michiaan Daily
Club Sports Roundup
RUGBY
Michigan State's Spartan Rugby Club once again decided to test their luck
against Michigan's rugby juggernaut, but came up short, dropping two mat-
ches to the Wolverines.
The Blue 'A' squad shut out MSU, 12-0, after leading at the half, 8-0. Rod
Sorenson, Paul LeBlanc, and Roy Bolles all scored for the ruggers. Michigan
had no trouble against State, although they experimented with many new
players.
The 'B' match was no contest as Michigan ran all over the Spartans'
second squad, 38-3. The Wolverines were also able to experiment with new
combinations. Only two members of the original 'B' team saw action against
the Spartans.
This weekend, members of Michigan's rugby club will join players from
other teams throughout the state to form an All-Star team that will compete
in Indianapolis against similar squads from the rest of the Midwest.
S AILING
Columbus, Ohio's Leather Lips Yacht Club was the sight of the Midwest
Singlehanded Championships last weekend. Seven midwestern schools each
sent two sailors, with the hope of having them qualify for the National
Championships in Minnesota.
Michigan's Scott Ferguson flew past a field of fourteen to capture first
place by a large margin. Ferguson's 180-pound frame helped counteract the
blustery conditions. Doug Wefer finished fourth for Michigan and barely
missed qualifying for the Nationals.
The women's team travelled to New Haven to participate in the Northeast
Women's Championships. Beth Borton's standout performance in the 'B'
division helped the Wolverines take fifth overall out of 14 teams. Sara
Makielski finished sixth in the tight division against some difficult Eastern
competition.
Next weekend, the men's and women's teams will take part in the Mid-
western Sloop Championships in Wisconsin. Winners of this regatta will
qualify for the National Championships in Charlestown, South Carolina.
FENCING
Rick Hoefer took first in the men's foil and second in the men's epee to
highlight a strong Michigan showing in the Michigan Divisional Fencing
Tournament at the Ann Arbor YMCA, this past Sunday.
Although there was no team competition, the Wolverines were clearly the
cream of the crop. In addition to Hoefer's strong showing, Steve Kerr took
fourth and Rick Cohen took seventh in the foil competition, while Bart Brush
finished fifth in the men's sabre.
Next Sunday, Michigan will host a tournament at the Coliseum in Ann Ar-
bor that will feature teams from all over the state. Starting time will be 9
an.on Saturday.
SOCCER
Tong Park's goal in the first half was all the Michigan Undergraduate Soc-
cer Club needed this past Saturday to defeat Windsor at Ferry Field, 3-0.
Fatih Tezok and Mike Haney also chipped in scores to help the undergrads
wun their record to 6-3.
Captain Eric Freeburg was very pleased with the team's play, citing
physical tactics and fine passing as the keys to the victory. In addition, he
was also pleased with the overall performance of the team this years in
comparison to last.
"We're a lot better this year," Freeburg said. "We have a younger team,
but we're stronger than last season's team.,,
The Wolverines host Eastern Michigan tonight at Ferry Field.
The graduate club did not fare quite as well, falling to Ferris State on
Saturday, 6-1.
It was not a very healthy graduate squad which played the Bulldogs, and
Michigan was forced to bring basically a reserve unit up to Ferris. Javier
Garaizar's goal ten minutes into the second half averted the shutout.
This week, Michigan looks to improve its 1-2-1 record when they travel to
Toledo today and and take on Wayne State Saturday. Although Sue Vodicka
scored her tenth goal of the season, the Women's Soccer Club was over-
whelmed by Michigan State, 5-1.
The Spartan ran all over Michigan, who seemed unprepared for the mat-
ch. This weekend, however, the Wolverines hope to bounce back and sweep a
tournament in Columbus to improve their 3-2 season record.
The Club Sports Roundup relates briefly the activities of Michigan
club sports during the previous week. This week's information was
compiled by Daily sports writer Mike Bradley.

Waiting game

Patience pays off for Michigan

's

Strenger

I (

By RON POLLACK
After four years of college, many
football players graduate to the NFL.
After four years of college, Michigan
offensive tackle Rich Strenger finally
graduated to the starting lineup.
For the first four years of his college
football career, Strenger was firmly en-
trenched on the Wolverine bench. Oc-
casional scraps of playing time would
be thrown his way at games end, but for
the most part he just sat and waited.
FINALLY, THE painstaking wait is
over. As a fifth-year senior, Strenger
has left behind his familiar spot on the
bench ,and now he toils as a starter on
the Michigan offensive line.
"It was a long time in coming," says
Strenger. "But when I came here, I
realized the situation I was in with
Bubba (Paris) and Ed (Muransky). I
knew I'd wait.
"When I signed to come here, I didn't
know Muransky and Paris had signed.
Then I read the lists and saw they were
6-7, 280 pounds and I was only 215 poun-
ds."
AND SO, THE "skeletal" 6-7, 215
pounder watched from the sidelines.
He padded his lean frame over the next
few years, so that he now weighs 261.
pounds, but as long as his hulking coun-
terparts were still around, Strenger

was little more than a backup.
"It was difficult because there was
the chance I'd step in if they got hurt,"
says Strenger. "But in the back of my
mind, I also knew there was the chance
I wouldn't play. So that made it tough
to get up for a game, but that was
someting that had to be done."
This wasn't the hardest part about
watching Paris, Muransky and friends
from the sideline, however.

"THE TOUGHEST part of not
playing much is after a big win you
wish you'd been a bigger part of it,"
says Strenger. "The two games like
this that stick out in my mind most are
the Rose Bowl game two years ago
(won by Michigan, 23-6) and Notre
Dame last year (won by Michigan, 25-
7)." In both games, Strenger only saw
special teams actions.
But this year has been different, as

Strenger finally figured out a way to get
around the mammoth stumbling blocks
posed by All-American performers
Muransky and Paris - he outlasted
them. Although all three came to
Michigan the same year, only Strenger
remains by virture of his being red-
shirted his freshman year.
Hence, he is now encountering both the
triumphs and frustrations that go
with a starting position.
"I ALWAYS wondered what it would
be like," Says Strenger. "A lot of good
things come from a win now, but if you
play bad you hear the criticism. So it's
not all a bed of roses."
It has been in the eyes of Michigan
head coach Bo Schembechler. "I think
he's played extremely well. He's as
good a tackle as there is in the leagueN
right now. That's how well he's
playing."
In the face of such lofty praise,
Strenger still insists that he has much
to master in the art of run and pass
blocking.
"It's my fifth year, but it's still a lear-
ning year since it's my first year star-
ting," he says. "So, every week is a
new learning experience of what to do
and what not to do."
But at least he's got something to doW
this year. It hasn't always been that
way.

'The toughest part of
not playing much is
after a big win you
wish you'd been a
bigger part of it.'
-Rich Strenger

Michigan re-enters the top twenty

AP Top Twenty

UPI Top Twenty

f

By ROB POLLARD
WITH WIRE SERVICE REPORTS
The Michigan Wolverines climbed
back into the United Press Inter-
national Top Twenty for the first time
since the opening week of balloting,
earning the 19th spot in the weekly poll.
Michigan's reappearance among the
nation's finest comes by virtue of con-
secutive victories over Indiana,
Michigan State and Iowa. the Maize nd
Blue fell out of the Top Twenty early in
the season following back to back losses
to Notre Dame and UCLA.
While Michigan became theBig Ten's
only entry in the UPI Top Twenty, the
prestigous conference failed to place a
team in the Associated Press Top
Twenty for the first time since the AP
poll began in1936.

MICHIGAN Coach Bo Schembechler
attributed much of the Big Ten's disap-
pearance from the rankings to his
team's poor showing on national
television in last month's 23-17, loss to
Notre Dame.
"It's a fact people will judge on what
they've seen, and we laid the biggest
egg in conference history on national
television," Schembechler told the
Chicago Football Writers in a telephone
interview.
"Unfortunately, from what we did in
that game, I wouldn't vote for us
either," he said. "The Big Ten went up
against some top competition in pre-
season nonconference games and was
not too successful. I wouldn't be sur-
prised if any Big Ten team will not be
ranked in the Top Twenty all year."

1. Washington (38)......
2. Pittsburgh (17).......
3. Georgia (1).........
4. SMU...........
5. Nebraska .............
6. Arkansas ...........
7. Alabama ..............
8. Arizona State ..........
9. Penn State ...........
10. North Carolina ........
11. UCLA .................
12. Southern California ....
13. West Virginia........
14. LSU .................
15. Notre Dame.........
16. Miami, Fla............
17. Florida State ........
18. Clemson ...........
19. Texas.............
20. Oklahoma..........

6-0-0
5-0-0
6-0-0
6-0-0
5-1-0
5-0-0
5-1-0
7-0-0
5-1-0
5-1-0
5-0-1
4-1-0
5-1-0
4-0-1
4-1-0
5-2-0
5-1-0
4-1-1
3-1-0
4-2-0

1,113
1,050
974
925
840
791
753
740
717
644
559
508
458
335
272
241
194
181
158
65

1. Washington .................6-0-0
2. Pittsburgh............ ..5-0-0
3. Georgia............. .......6-0-0
4. SMU .........................6-0-0
5. Nebraska ....................5-1-0
6. Arkansas ..................5-0-0
7. North Carolina ..............5-1-0
8. Penn State .................5-1-0
9. Alabama..... ..............5-1-0
10. UCLA....................5-0-1
11. West Virginia .................5-1-0
12. LSU ..........................4-0-1
13. Notre Dame ...................4-1-0
14. Florida State .................. 51-0
15. Texas.........................3-1-0
16. Miami, Fla....................5-2-0
17. Clemson ...................4-1-1
18. Oklahoma ....................4-2-0
19. MICHIGAN.................4-2-0
20. Florida .......................4-2-0

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Hi honey,
I'm home
St. Louis' Willie McGee slides safely
home in last night's World Series game
as the Brewers' Simmons drops the
ball. McGee scored on a second inning'
double by teammate Tom Herr.

I F I I

IACED11IIAA

R IGI NA
THINKING
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ON CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
number 12th

Tigers raise ticket prices
DETROIT (AP) - The Detroit Tigers Prices for box seats
will raise ticket prices for the 1983 from $8 to $9, while pri
season by 50 cents to $1, the American seats wil be increased
League baseball team said yesterday. Reserved seats will cos
"We reluctantly make this move admission $5, and bleact
because of continually rising operating
expenses and player salaries," said
Jim Campbell, general manager. T Y ,U!

wil be raised
ces for all other
d by 50 cents.
st $7.50, general
!her seats $3.50.
A Y3 n

EPILLIUAIJ

r

TONIGH T The deadline for purchasing student-
p priority season tickets for the 1982-83
Michigan basketball season is Friday,
THE DITTILIES October 22. Tickets can be purchased at
the Athletic Ticket Office at the corner
of State and Hoover. The price is $40 per
season ticket.

wl

DUKE

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