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October 20, 1982 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-10-20

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SPORTS
The Michigan Daily Wednesday, October 20, 1982 Page 7
Cardinal offense, rain sober Brewers

ST. LOUIS (AP) - At press time last night the St.
Louis Cardinals held an 8-0 lead over the Milwaukee
Brewers in game six of the World Series. Two long
rain delays forced umpires to halt the game in the
bottom of the sixth inning.
* At midnight last night baseball commissioner
*Bowie Kuhn was still determined to finish the game.
"We're going to play this game until it is completed,"
Kuhn said. "We could get showers off and on until 11
p.m. (Central Daylight Time). Behind that we have
good, satisfactory weather."
KEITH HERNANDEZ had just smashed a two-run
homer, increasing the Cardinal bulge when rain,
which had started a half-inning earlier, became
heavier. As Brewer Manager Harvey Kuenn went to
the mound to remove starting pitcher Don Sutton, the
umpires ordered the field covered.
The game was delayed 26 minutes.
Hernandez's homer was the second two-run shot of
the game for the Cardinals, who jumped on Sutton for
seven hits in 4 1-3 innings. Darrell Porter had connec-
ted in the fourth as St. Louis tried to force the Series
to a decisive seventh game.
THE CARDS jumped in front with a pair of unear-
ned runs in the second. Designated hitter Dane Iorg
was credited with a double when his drive into the left
field corner glanced off Ben Oglivie's glove. Then

Homers help
Birds take
8-0 lead
in game six
Willie McGee sent an easy grounder to shortstop
Robin Yount, but the ball scooted between the shor-
tstop's legs for an error, scoring Iorg. When Tommy
Herr followed with a double off the right field wall,
only his second hit of the Series, McGee scored.
In the third, Lonnie Smith reached on an error and
advanced to third on a stolen base and an infield out.
Then he tried to steal home but was called out by
plate umpire Jim Evans.
George Hendrick opened the fourth with a single
and scored on Porter's homer. Iorg tripled and came

in on a suicide squeeze bunt by Herr, making it 5-0.
IN THE FIFTH, Smith opened with a single and
rode home on Hernandez's shot.
When play resumed, Jim Slaton relieved Sutton
and retired Hendrick and Porter, ending the inning.
Lonnie Smith, who suffered a jammed ring finger
on his left hand when he stole second in the thrid in-
ning, left the game after the rain delay to receive
treatment for the injury. Rookie David Green
replaced him in left field for St. Louis.
THE RAIN DELAY did not disturb Stuper, who
retired Milwaukee in order in the sixth. Through six,
Stuper had permitted only two harmless singles and
retired 11 Brewer batters in a row.
Doc Medich, making his first appearance of the
Series, relieved Slaton at the start of the Cardinal six-
th of Milwaukee.
SIorg opened the Cards' sixth with his third extra-
base hit of the game, a double to left center. With rain
starting to fall again, Medich threw a wild pitch, Iorg
advancing to third. Then McGee singled to right,
making it 8-0. Herr dropped a single to left and the
runners advanced on Medich's second wild pitch of
the inning.
After Ozzie Smith rolled out, the rain increased and
with Green at bat, the umpires ordered the tarps
again.

JUNIOR HALFBACK "GETS MEAN":
Comby sets an aggressive example

By CHUCK WHITMAN
; Who is that student flinging her body about Ferry Field and stopping the op-
position dead in their kilts? Chances are it's Michigan field hockey player
Denise Comby displaying the aggressive defense that has become her
trademark.
"I'd rather lay my body down to block a shot than let an opponent shoot," said
_he center halfback, whose aggressive and unyielding nature is complimented
by her strength and desire..
WHERE DOES Comby get all her bold energy? The junior physical
;ducation major attributes it to "nervous tension." Well, nervous tension
exhibited in a skilled or overpowering force. Powerful enough to have earned
her Most Valuable player honors last year.
"She's still the best player on the team," commented Wolverine goalie Nancy
,irsh.
Comby may not be the leading scorer, but she is the heart of the squad's
stellar defense and an excellent clutch player.
"I DON'T GET mad, I get mean," explains Comby. "Lam defensive-min-
ded. I-take any goal scored against us personally. Any goal scored against us is
a sign of weakness on our part and reflects lack of skill on my part."
Comby is a gifted athlete, who is highly touted in softball and basketball as
well as field hockey. Field hockey is definitely the sport for the New Jersey
native.
"It's constant actioneven when your not around the ball," she said. "You're
always moving, and I really enjoy it.'
PLAYING CENTER halfback requires Comby to run a lot as she has both of-
fensive and defensive responsibilities. She said she doesn't mind setting up the
plays rather than scoring.
"I really don't care how much I score as long as one of my teammates does,
and we win," she said. "(And) everybody plays well ... and it's fun. That's
what is important."
Comby truly enjoys playing the sport. In her three-year starting career with
the Wolverines, she has only missed one game - this season's opening game
:against St. Louis. She had hurt her knee in practice and was sidelined for
almost a week.
"IT HURT ME in terms of endurance, but there is no problem now," she said.
0i was looking forward to the game especially since St. Louis had such a good
team, and we had worked so hard all summer and had improved dramatically.
It was a good challenge and we deserved to win."
Indeed the team has matured as they are ranked 21st in the nation with an 8-2
record.
Asked about the remainder of the season, Comby claims that the team should
be moving up in the rankings. Although Comby "does not take any game
lightly" she is already looking forward to the contest with Old Dominion, which
is also highly ranked. That game should prove exactly how good this team is and
how far it will go in terms of qualifying for nationals.
If Comby can continue to perform like she did this past weekend and function
as the catalyst for the squad, the team will go far. It will cease to suffer from
underexposure and fans will flock to Ferry Field to see tough, aggressive and
physical hockey, played the Comby way.

AP Photo
St. Louis Cardinal base runner Lonnie Smith dives for home plate as
Milwaukee Brewer catcher Ted Simmons reaches to tag him in the third in-
ning of Tuesday's World Series game. Smith was called out on the play,
however, television replays indicated that Smith may have been safe.

I

GRIDDE PICKS

Just because a woman happened to
win last week's griddes and
thereby completely mortify the male
members of the Daily sports staff in the
process, a full-fledged attack on
females has ensued. Well guys, we're
sorry ! We know how fragile your egos
are. After all, when you can't play
college football with the big boys, you
might as well try to write about it.
We learned our lesson. It's just like
Mom used to say, "Boys don't like it
when you beat them." They get very
cranky when humiliated by the
"weaker sex." From now on, we will
just stick to the kitchen, making our
men quiche.
So guys, try and redeem yourselves
by bringing your picks, along with your
name, phone number and address to the
Daily office at 420 Maynard by mid-
night Friday and you may win a chance
to take a FEMALE to Pizza Bob's for a
small, one-item pizza.
1. MICHIGANat Northwestern
(pick score)
2. Illinois at Wisconsin

3. Ohio State at Indiana
4. Purdue at Michigan State
5. Iowa at Minnesota
6. Pitt at Syracuse
7. Georgia at Kentucky
8. SMU at Texas
9. Missouri at Nebraska,
10. Arkansas at Houston
11. Penn State at West Virginia
12. South Carolina at LSU
13. Harvard at Princeton
14. Maryland at Duke
15. Chattanooga at Jacksonville State
16. Colgate at Rutgers
17. Eastern Michigan at Northern Illinois
18. Bowdoin at Coast Guard
19. Slippery Rock at Lock Haven State
20. DAILY LIBELS at Hopeless Hurons

Daily Photo by JEFF 5CHRIER

Michigan field hockey player Denise Comby shows her smile. She is rarely
seen smiling on the field, however, where she prefers to "get mean." Com-
by, a defensive player from New Jersey has led the Michigan stickers to an
8-2 record and a 21 national ranking.

I

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Michigan Nuclear Weapons Freeze
FOLK MUSIC BENEFIT CONCERT
TOMORROW NIGHT -8:00

Kenty joins boxing card at Crisler

A GEMINI
( AF

FOOTLOOSE

By RICHARD DEMAK
The groundwork has been laid for a
December or January bout at Crisler
Arena featuring former world-
lightweight champion Hilmer Kenty.
Kenty's opponent is slated to be Greg
Coverson, according to promoter
Robert Watson.
Although the contracts have yet to be
signed, Watson, former chairman of the
State Boxing Commissin, said in
reference to Kenty's manager Tom
Barlow and Coverson's manager Billy
Gootz, "all parties are agreeable."
CBS television has expressed an in-
terest in the match.
THE FIGHT would be the second
promoted by the partnership of GWS
Limited, of which Watson is president,
and the University of Michigan Athletic
Department. the initial "Fight Night
on Campus," as it is promoted, is
schedued for November 17 at 7:30.
Originally planned for an earlier date,
.the card was pushed back to the 17th to
allow for the signing of contracts com-
pleting the undercard.
Fight Night on Campus will feature
Mickey Goodwin, former World Boxing
Association (WBA) fifth-ranked mid-
,dleweight in a ten-round bout. Good-

win's opponent will be Rocky Stevens
24-10) from Jacksonville, Florida. Hurt
while training for a match with mid-.
dleweight champion Marvin Hagler,
Goodwin has now fully recovered, ac-
cording to Watson.
Kenty, who like Goodwin once was
managed by Detroit's Kronk Gym's
Emanuel Stewart, has also reportedly
recovered from an injury: a detached
retina, which once had threatened his
career.
Tickets for the Fight Night, 48 total
rounds involving six undercard bouts,
are available at all Sears, CTC outlets
and the University ticket office.
Ringside seats are priced at $10, lower
level at $8, and upper level at $6 and $4.
The fight will also be broadcast on TV.
Pistons' Owens injured
DETROIT (UPI) - Detroit Piston
backup center Tom Owens will be out of
action for up to four weeks because of a
broken right thumb, the team announ-
ced yesterday.
Owens received the injury Monday
night during the Pistons' 115-96 win
over the Indiana Pacers in
Bloomington, Ind. the 33-year-old NBA

veteran was flown back to Detroit
yesterday and the thumb was placed in
a splint cast.
OWENS, WHO was acquired Sept. 23
from Indiana for a future draft pick, is the
most-traveled player in the NBA.
Detroit is the 11th team for the 11-year
veteran.
The 6-foot-10, 220-pound native of
South carolina averaged 8.3 points and
5.3 rebounds in Detroit's five preseason
games.
The Pistons also announced General
Manager Jack McCloskey is scheduled
to fly to St. Louis today to meet with
Cliff Levingston, the team's unsigned
first round draft pack, and the for-
ward's agent.
The team said McCloskey, 21-year-
old Levingston and agent Lance
Luchnick would attempt to reach
agreement on a contract. If they are
successful, Levinston would play
against the Kings in St. Louis tonight.

Spikers defeated
MT. PLEASANT- The Michigan
Volleyball team was defeated by a
powerful Central Michigan squad 15-7,
15-7, 6-15 and 15-5, last night in Mt.
Pleasant, Michigan. The loss extended
Michigan's losing streak to five mat-
ches, and dropped their overall record
to 9-12.
Central Michigan wasted no time in
manifesting it's superiority, jumping
to a 12-0 lead in the opening game.
Michigan, however, earned some
respectability by narrowing the final
margin of defeat to 15-7.
THE WOLVERINES could fare no
better in the second game as the Chip-
pewas topped the Maize and Blue by an
identical 15-7 score.
With their backs to the wall, the
Wolverines salvaged some satisfaction.
They managed to take the third game
15-6.

I
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