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October 12, 1982 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-10-12

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6

Page 2--Tuesday, October 12, 1982-The Michigan Daily
Council passes anti-poverty move

IN BRIEF

By KRISTIN STAPLETON
The Ann Arbor City Council voted last
night to devote $5,000 to providing free
meals to the city's poor.
The resolution was the first concrete
step the council has taken to fight
poverty since the report of the city's
poverty committee was released last
month by committee chairman Louis
Velker (R-Fifth Ward).
COUNCIL also voted down a proposal
to provide $2,000 to pay for city
policemen to patrol the University
Homecoming Parade on Oct. 30.
COUNCILMEMBER Leslie Morris
(D=Second Ward) said the poverty
resolution is "precedent setting"
because it marks the beginning of city
involvement in funding social services.
Mayor Louis Belcher replied,
however, that he saw the city as merely
a -"safety net" in times of crisis. "The
local government should not be in the

business of social services," he said.
The money will be given to the city's
Community Development Department
which will find a suitable organization
to provide the free meals. Council
member Virginia Johansen (R-Third
Ward), who submitted the resolution,
said the plan will provide some im-
mediate help to areas which need atten-
tion.
COUNCIL also passed two proposals
to establish task forces to study the
problems of emergency housing and the
need for a city-controlled center to help
distribute excess food from such sour-
ces as supermarkets or school can
drives.
If the task forces discover that these
problems warrant the allocation of city
funds, Johansen said, the money will be
administered through the CDD.
Johansen said she could not estimate
the amount of money council would be
able to provide, because it is not yet

clear how much the city will be able to
spend.
BEFORE THE vote on the proposal
to give the University Activities Center
funds for parade patrols, UAC member
Rick McGuines said, "I can't guarantee
that there will be a parade if we aren't
funded." But councilmember Raphael
Ezekiel(D-Third Ward) said, "I see no
reason why the city of Ann Arbor should
pay for this parade rather than any
other."
He advised UAC members to seek
money from the University Panhellenic
Association, claiming that "If we spent
one one-hundreth of the money that the
fraternities spend on beer, we could
relieve any problem the city has."
Mayor Belcher, who supported the
proposal, said the council should sup-
port University-sponsored activities, Velk
especially this one. ...chairs povert
Vacantcy rate still
(Continued from Page 1)
Several companies participating in Andrus-Davis
the Housing Office survey said that customers rentaled
although their vacancy rates are no rents, and more le
longer as high as they were the first tract renters, Mill
week of September, it has been tougher company has not usu
to fill houses and apartments than it Gary Barker of B
was last year. also said renters
"I'VE HAD to work three times as picky" and looking a
hard for half the money," Robert Miller before making a fi
of the Andrus-Davis Company said last year.
yesterday. Miller said he has seen more MODERN ana
apartment "shoppers" who will look at son Dan Kapland sai(
man aprtmntsbefore making a not really noticed the
many apartments efrmkngadoubling up, as he s
choice, unlike previous years.d i ,
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ty committee
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xible leases to at-
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aker Management
"were being more
at more apartments
nal selection than
gement spokesper-
ci his company has
e effects of students
till sees a demand
ingle person apar-
ded that students
sticated" in their
this year, and that
d of repair may not
d in the past.
partments up in the
lan said.
so having to com-
residential housing
o Old Town Realty
is.

FAST STEREO SERVICE
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tments. But he ad
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Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press international reports
Likelihood of sub escape rises
BERGA NAVAL BASE, Sweden- The Swedish navy continued its search
for a foreign submarine in Hors Bay yesterday for the 11th day but the
nation's top military man said the likelihood was increasing that the sub had
escaped.
Navy spokesman Capt. Sven Carlsson said there had been no "firm in-
dication" of the sub's presence in the waters off the Musko Naval Base since
Friday.
"It could still be there, but the likelihood is gradually decreasing," said
Gen. Lennart Ljung, the armed forces commander in chief.
There was no further word of a second sub the navy said it detected outside
the entrance to the bay last Thursday. Ljung said Sunday it might have been
the first sub after it made its escape.
Carlsson also said the navy was having trouble getting efficient sonar
operators because of what rock'n'roll has done to the hearing of the young.
He did not elaborate on any specific problems in the sub hunt related to
hearing problems.
Survey predicts wage increases
WASHINGTON- A survey of more than 1,000 business firms released
yesterday predicts employees can expect salary increases averaging 7.6
percent in 1983-less than last year, but still enough to keep up with inflation.
Sibson & Company Inc., a management consulting firm based in Prin-
ceton, N.J., projected pay hikes for 1983 would be less than the 9.1 percent
average for 1982. "Companies are tending to be somewhat cautious, with
some taking a two-pronged approach to salary administration in 1983," said
James Mitchell, Sibson & Co. managing principal for surveys.
The pay raises-which could vary among industries-are expected to be
above the projected 1983 inflation rate, which most government and private
analysts predict will be 6 percent next year.
The survey covered respondents from virtually all industrial sectors, in-
cluding durable and non-durable goods, high technology, insurance, finan-
cial, consumer products, retail and wholesale, real estate, service and elec-
tric utilities.
Gunman gives up; 2 dead
RALEIGH, N.C.- A gunman who feared police would kill him surren-
dered yesterday and was charged with murdering his sister and her infant
son during a three-day standoff in an Amtrak sleeper car. He released the
women's 3 -year-old daughter unharmed.
Police said they had not determined what prompted the man, identified as
Evangelista Navas Villabona, 29, of Bucaramanga, Colombia, to initiate the
long siege as the Miami-to-New York Amtrak Silver Star approached the
Raleigh train station Friday morning.
The gunman passed the girl in a pink blanket through a window around 1
a.m. He threw down his .45-caliber machine gun and gave himself up around
5:45 a.m. after a New York City man he called "padrino"-Spanish for god-
father-spoke to him through a bullhorn. The bodies of his sister and her in-
fant son were removed from the stifling 6-foot-by-10-foot compartment later.
"I feel good that we didn't fire a single shot," Police Chief Frederick
Heineman said. "We were all saddened by the loss of the baby, but I felt we
got all we possibly could out of this."
The gunman was charged with two counts of first-degree murder and one
count of kidnapping the girl. He was being held in the acute care section of
maximum-security Central Prison, and a first appearance was scheduled
for today in Wake County District Court.
Reagan speaks at GOP rally
DALLAS- President Reagan, campaigning for Texas Republicans,
aimed another shot at Democrats yesterday before returning to the White
House to work on what aides insist will be a "non-partisan" speech on the
economy.
In a speech prepared for delivery to a Republican rally, the president
called his Democratic critics "Monday morning quarterbacks" with no
economic alternatives to offer.
Reagan is campaigning for Republican Gov. William Clements, who is
locked in a tough re-election battle against Democratic State Attorney
General Mark White, and for Rep. Jim Collins, a conservative Republican, is
given hardly any chance of upsetting Democratic Sen. Lloyd Bensten.
"We have pulled America back from the edge of disaster," he said, con-
tending that current hard times were caused by those "who are now our
biggest critics."
The rhetoric yesterday followed the pattern White House aides-have said
will characterize presidential speeches in the final three weeks of the mid-
term election campaign: Blame the Democrats for economic hard times and
accentuate any positive economic developments.
Harvard Medical School
celebrates 200th birthday
BOSTON- Harvard Medical School this week celebrates its 200th an-
niversary with a symposia by 40 of the world's most noted physicians, in-
cluding three who yesterday were selected Nobel Prize winners in Medicine.
In 1782, medical classes at Harvard University meant attending a few
classes and then working for a doctor in hopes of learning how to be one.
There were three professors and classes were held in a basement room.
Today, there are 3,000 faculty members and 660 students selected from
among the elite of the world, all vying to be graduates of Harvard Medical
School.
There will be 100 deans too from the world's other great medical schools,
converging to hear talks that will change the way medicine is practiced.
Harvard is regarded as one of the world's leading medical schools,
although it was founded third behind schools in New York and Philadelphia.

Vol. XCIII, No. 29
Tuesday, October 12, 1982
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
scription rates: $13 September through April (2 semesters); $14 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday mor-
nings. Subscription rates: $7.50 in Ann Arbor; $8 oy mail outside Ann Arbor.
Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER: Send
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