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October 08, 1982 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-10-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Multi
COLLEGE STATION, Texas (AP)- Texas
&M scientists say they have developed a way
to get hydrogen fuel from water so efficiently
xhat someday hydrogen may be cheaper than
*asoline.
The technique may eventually be used in
.6ackyard solar-powered energy plants, they
say.
In an announcement Wednesday, the Texas
A&M scientists called the technology a
breakthrough" that could lead to the
Widespread use of hydrogen as a relatively
eheap, pollution-free fuel.
DR. JOHN Bockris, head of the Texas A&M
Alternative
partyfinds
home i
Alaskan,
politics
FAIRBANKS, Alaska - "ALASKA:
LAND OF THE INDIVIDUAL ... and
Other Endangered Species," proclaims
Sa popular T-shirt.
The message goes a long way toward
explaining why the Libertarian Party
has found a home in Alaska, where it en-
(joys much more political power than
anywhere else in the country.
- DICK Randolph of Fairbanks, who
preaches unfettered individual rights
and freedom from government inter-
ference, was the first Libertarian ever
elected to office in a state when he won
a seat in the Alaska House of Represen-
tatives in 1978.
0 The number of Libertarian state
legislators in the nation doubled in 1980
when Alaska voters re-elected Ran-
.dolph and sent Ken Fanning, also of
Fairbanks, to join him in the 40-
member House.
The party says it will have at least 21
gubernatorial candidates on ballots this
year, and will have candidates for
enough offices to give 75 percent of the
voters a chance to vote for at least one
Libertarian.
* ALL TOLD, the party says, 900 to
1,000 advocates of the Libertarian
philosophy will be on ballots in 46
states.
That philosophy advocates near ab-
,solute laissez fire; a free market
;economy, and- no government restric-
tions on personal behavior that does not
infringe on other people's rights. Liber-
tarians would limit government to the
single task of protection - protecting
the country from foreign attack and
protecting people from crime.
In 1980, Libertarian presidential can-
didate Ed Clark, an antitrust lawyer
with Atlantic Richfield in California,
became the first third-party candidate
in history to get on the ballot of every
state.

-use hydrogen

Hydrogen Research Center, said the new
system uses solar-powered electrolysis to get
hydrogen from water. Large-scale production.
of hydrogen could make fuel to power cars,
buses and planes.
Two A&M research associates, Dr. Marek
Szklarczyk, 31, and Dr. A.Q. Contractor, 32,
developed new devices to make the technology
possible, said Bockris.
The A&M system uses silicon solar-
electricity cells immersed in a water and acid
solution. When an electrical current flows
through the solution, the water molecules are
split into their component atoms of hydrogen

and oxygen, and the hydrogen can be collected.
TECHNIQUES similar to that used at A&M
have been tried at-other laboratories, said Con-
tractor, but high efficiency rates have lasted
for only brief periods at those labs.
Mark Wrighton, a professor of chemistry at
MIT, said the A&M development "may be a
significant demonstration of an important
scientific principle," but he noted that other
labs, including MIT, have achieved similar ef-
ficiencies for short periods of time.
"It is far,. far, far from a practical ap-
plication," Wrighton said of the A&M develop-
ment.

The Michigan Daily-Friday, October 8, 1982-Page 13
'uel developed
SIMILAR reactions greeted an announ-
cement last month by University of California powered hydrogen plant being developed by
researchers who also used solar energy to split A&M could be set up in a backyard to make gas
water molecules into hydrogen and oxygen. as a heating fuel, or to drive water pumps or
Contractor said the laboratory device using farms.
the new techniques has been run as long as four A major advantage of hydrogen, said Con-
hours, and "we were able to maintain a stable tractor, is that the fuel burns cleanly, with
system. Other groups have gotten efficiencies water as the only significant by-product.
of this rate for short periods, but then drops to In California, researchers used sunlight or
zero." disks of iron oxide-rust-submerged in a-
Contractor said bountiful, cheap hydrogen solution of water and sodium sulphate. On&
could be used to boost the heating value of disk is coated with silicon, the other with
natural gas. Experimental cars and trucks are magnesium, and sunlight creates a steady flow
already using hydrogen as a fuel. of electricity on a wire between the two disks.
THE SCIENTISTS noted that the solar- Hydrogen gas then bubbles off.

SEVEN
C)F PI H

CHAPERS

F rROCK C,

A

RT

.4

Arroyo
takes stand
,m . econonies
arson trial
(Continued from Page 1)
HE TOLD the court of the problems
he had with homosexuality and trying
to become a priest. At age 19, he studied
10 months for the priesthood at a
seminary in Commack, New York, he
said, but found himself unable to pursue
the vocation after suffering repeatedly
,from anxiety attacks before prayer or
,>confession.
"I felt guilty about not knowing my
rsexual feelings," he said. A council of
priests at the seminary advised him to
leave and to seek psychiatric help, he
said. He said that he thought the priests
:made that decision because of his
homosexuality and emotional im-
maturity.
Arroyo said he did meet with a
psychiatrist, but only for a short time.
"I was becoming more anxious and
nervous about the counseling," he said.
"The doctor was trying to encourage
me to develop attractions toward
women and also to go to college and get
a car. I felt incapable of doing these
*things."
COMPATABILITY with co-workers
was also a problem for Arroyo, he said,
and was the reason he had more than a
dozen jobs in as many years. "I felt that 1
some treated me like an outcast
sometimes, like I had leprosy or
something."
Arroyo also said he had many family
problems and was frequently moving in
and out of his father's home in Com-
miack.

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Location
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