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October 08, 1982 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-10-08

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Paqe 12 Fridav October 8 1982-The Michigan Daily

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THE IS A DANGERIN AMERICA

FACT: The President has introduced an amendment to strip the first amendment and allow
organized group prayer in the public schools.
FACT: Currently in a Jackson County school district, creationism, a belief that holds that the
earth is only 6,000 years old, is being illegally taught as science in a public school.
FACT: ,Banned books in America include five versions of the dictionary, books such as Father
Christmas, The Diary of Anne Frank; Alice in Wonderland and hundreds of others. More banned
books cases have been reported in Michigan during September than in any other state according
to the American Library Association.

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"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good
(people) to do nothing. "-Edmund Burke
VOICE OF REASON FALL CONFERENCE/ WORKSHOPS
Saturday, October 16, U-M, Modern Languages Building
(Thayer & E. Washington)
Pre-registration is $5.00 or $7.00 at the door beginning at 9:00 a.m. Saturday.

Doily Photo by SCOTT ZOLTON
The University's Museum of Art, whose lobby is pictured here, will boost its reputation with the current show of Frank
Stella's works, museum officials predict.
Stella.howpaints rosy
e o. rtmuseum

10:00-11:00
11:00-12:00
12:00-1:00
1:00-2:00
2:00-3:00

Opening
Workshop I
Lunch
Workshop 11
Workshop Ill

Marilyn Rowens, Voice of Reason
State Education Chair
Creationism, Dr. Meta Baba, Prof.
of Anthropology, Wayne State U.
Constitutional Rights, Howard Simon,
Director, Michigan ACLU.
Repressive Legislation, Eli Master,
Voice of Reason State Action Chair.
"The New Right," Margot Duley-Morrow,
President, Michigan NOW
Censorship, Prof. Julie Todaro,
U-M School of Library Science.
Sex Education, Dr. Sylvia Hacker,
U-M Schools of Nursing and Public Health.
Keynote Speaker

3:00-4:30

Plenary
Session

The Voice of Reason is a non-profit national organization dedicated to personal freedom,
the separation of church and state and free inquiry.
CO-SPONSORED BY MSA
................... .............--- .-.- ----- - ----- -
Please register me for the conference. En- YES! I WANT TO BE A VOICE OF REASON.
closed is $5.00 payable to the Voice of Reason. Send me your newsletter. Here are my dues.
$5.00 student $15 individual $20 family
Name _other. All donations are tax-deductible.
~~~- want to help. Tell me what I can do.
Address
Name
Address

By LAURA KEIDAN
The University Museum of Art, never
the most popular tourist attraction on
campus, has made a serious bid to
change its image.
The work of Frank Stella, inter-
nationally acclaimed painter and print
maker, has come to Ann Arbor, and
area art aficionados think this could
help the museum's reputation immen-
sely.
"THIS SHOW very much puts us on
the map," said Museum Director Evan
Mauer of the newly installed Frank
Stella Prints: 1967-1982. "The vibes are
so good. This will help us get more big
shows .. .it shows what a great univer-
sity museum can do."
The exhibit, which opened Saturday
night, has 83 prints, and takes up all of

the second floor exhibition gallery.
About 500 people attended the
opening, and about 50,000 are expected
for the exhibition's two-month stay, ac-
cording to Mauer.
"It's a real coup to get something this
major in Ann Arbor," said Lois Baru, a
museum administrator and tour guide.
"The exposure the museum is getting
is fantastic," she added. "The support
from the community is amazing."
PROFESSOR Richard Axsom, of the
University of Michigan at Dearborn,
approached Stella with an idea for the
print exhibit several years ago. Said
Stella: "I didn't think it was a good idea
at the time, but as I made more prints it
began to make more sense. Then the
University got funding from the
National Endowment for the Arts and it
made sense.''
After its stay in Ann Arbor, the 'show
will travel across the country and even-
tually end up in New York's Whitney
Museum.
While the Stella exhibit puts the
museum's current modern art collec-
tion in a good night, Maurer admitted
that the permanent modern art collec-
tion is not "the best." He said the
enormous expense of "quality" modern
art has made it hard to acquire good
contemporary pieces.
IN ADDITION, Maurer said it would
be hard to justify making expensive
acquisitions with the economy in its
current shape.
The opening of the exhibit, however,

did coincide with -an improvement in
the museum's Asian Galleries. A $3,000
renovation of the gallery, which con-
tains oriental paintings, pottery, and
furniture, was completed a week before
the Stella opening.
According to Maurer, the museum's
Asian Collection is one of the best in the
world. The renovation, Maurer said,
was done to make the presentation
more natural, by displaying the art on
Tatami (rice) mats, and by recreating
a 19th century Chinese scholar's study.
THE STUDENTS who saw the exhibit
Were, in general, impressed. "I like the
fact that they have art happening now,"
said LSA junior Claira Lieberman.
About one third of the people at the
opening were students-the rest were a
mix of University faculty and culture
seeking Ann Arborites.
"I like the way it's set up," said city
art dealer Claire Spittler. "It's much
bigger than I expected-it actually fills
the room. I'm very impressed with the
show."
But, as can be expected, not everyone
appreciated Stella's abstract prints.
Said Nathan Hayes: "Some of his work
doesn't seem to take much skill."
Church

The Voice of Reason, 4008 Michigan
Union, Ann Arbor, MI 48109
663-3757.

I
I
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The Voice of Reason,
4008 Michigan Union
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 663-3757

E-Systems continues
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a0

offe rs
personality
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able to see communications rev-
olutionized by his development
of the first successful system of
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His first experimental transmis-
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system to the point that a radio
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E-Systems scientists and
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the technology he began. Today,
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and applications requiring micro-

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For a reprint of the Marconi
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reer opportunities with E-Systems

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(Continued from Page 2)

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tology.
After a period of silence to remember
the less fortunate people of the world,
Dreher read from a church publication
and the group talked about their per-
sonal experiences of the week and their
opinions about the church and its ideas.
Another church member, Massoude
Radmanesh, is a Ph.D. candidate in
electrical engineering. He credits the
church with his success as manager of
his co-op house. ' I had never been' a
manager, but I feel confident now," he
said.

663-6771

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