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October 07, 1982 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-10-07

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, October7, 1982-Page 5

Swedish navy tightens
net around mystery sub

Daily Photo by DEBORAH LEWIS
The rarely visited Clements Library remains a mysfery to most students. The library contains many rare American
books, manuscripts, and original documents dating back to 1493.
Clements Library still1

BERGA NAVAL BASE, Sweden
(AP)-Forty Swedish vessels and a
fleet of helicopters tightened their net
yesterday around a submarine believed
to be a Soviet-bloc vessel near a
top secret naval base.
The navy dropped seven depth
charges and threatened to sink the sub
if it tries to break out of the Swedish
trap.
NAVAL OFFICIALS speculated the
unidentified vessel-believed to be
hiding in a narrow, 12-mile-long chan-
nel in waters south of Stockholm-
might be a small, new spy sub, possibly
remote-controlled and without a crew.
Sweden has refused to speculate on
the nationality of the intruder, but
newspapers have said the vessel was
believed to belong to a Warsaw Pact
nation, perhaps the Soviet Union or
Poland.
The Kremlin, in its first comment on
the incident, said the sub saga may be a
hoax designed to disrupt Scandinavian-
Soviet ties.
THE DRAMATIC sub hunt near the
Musko naval base 18 miles south of
Stockholm is the most serious naval in-
cident since October 1981, when a Soviet
submarine U137 ran aground close to
the main southern navy base at
Karlskrona.
Yesterday the navy deployedrcoast
guard commandos and army troops
near the search zone to bolster the fleet
of hunters, including a submarine
salvage vessel and 10 helicopters.
"If the suspected submarine tried to

break out we might resort to more
drastic methods including sinking it,'
navy Capt. Cay Holmberg said.
"OUR GOAL is to force the sub-
marine to surface undamaged," said
Holmberg, a veteran anti-submarine
warfare specialist.
Since the sub was first spotted
Friday, 25 depth charges have been
dropped.
Asked if the ship had been damaged,
Holmberg said: "It is possible."
Navy spokesman Capt. Hans von
Hofsten said, "We are widening the
scope of possibilities. The vessel has
withstood a very hard shakeup and has
not always reacted as expected."
Other officials speculated the vessel
may be unmanned.
In Moscow, the official news agency
Tass cast doubt on the existence of a
"mysterious unidentified underwater

object" and questioned Western
motives for publicizing the hunt.
"The atmosphere of tension is being
artificially whipped up by the
propaganda machinery." Tass said,
referring to reports from the Swedish
Defense Ministry about the search for a
submarine.
Subscribe to The
Michigan Daily
764-0558

unknown around

By RITA GIRARDI -
Tucked unobtrusively between the
Aresident's house, and, the Un-
dergraduate Library, the Clements
Library remains one of the most unique
yet most unknown buildings on campus.
John Dann, director of the library,
said unlike the other campus libraries,
Clements caters to the advanced
researcher who needs to use its collec-
tion of rare books, manuscripts, and
other original documents from early
American history.
THE LIBRARY'S material spans
ore than 365 years, from Columbus'
wreport of his first voyage dated 1493 up
to the late 19th century.
Clements library boasts a collection
of 47,000 rare. books, 36,000 maps, and
300,000 letters and documents, as well
as an extensive collection of colonial
newspapers and 18th-century sheet
music.
The original deed purchasing
Mackinac Island from the Indians and
handwritten letters from Benjamin
*ranklin, Thomas Jefferson, and
Benedict Arnold are a few examples of
the, research material the library of-
fers.

MOST OF the 150 people who visit the
library each week come to view the
exhibits, Dann said. Among the current
displays at the library is a world map
drawn in 1674 by a misionary in China
and discovered about 30 years ago in a
one-room Ann Arbor schoolhouse.
Another exhibit includes letters from
George Washington, Patrick Henry and
Revolutionary War Gen. Anthony
Wayne, after whom Wayne County is
named. The same display shows letters
and diaries of Civil War soldiers, rare
war photographs, and letters from
Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis,
Robert E. Lee and Ulysses S. Grant.
Dann estimates that 500 people an-
nually use the library for research. He
added, however, that these figures are
not a measure of the library's
usefulness. "We don't mark our suc-
cess by the number of visitors."
THE LIBRARY is known among
historians and scholars worldwide for
its outstanding collection of early
Americana. Half of the people who use
the library for research purposes do so
from out of state, Dann said. Because
no materials are circulated, the library
will photocopy requested documents for

campus
a fee and mail it to long-distance
researchers.
Mark Odintz, a teaching assistant
and graduate student currently
working on his Ph.D. in early American
history, said the Clements Library in-
fluenced his decision to continue his
post-graduate studies at the University.
"The nature of manuscript sources is
unique," Odintz said. The documents
"aren't replaceable."
THE LIBRARY'S facilities attract
visiting specialists in his area of study.
"It's a good way to meet important
people in the field," Odintz said.
Dann said, "The library's benefit to
the University is to bolster research
and teaching and to give a level of sup-
port that's first rate. It makes the
University of Michigan a little more
special than any other university."
The library was a gift to the Univer-
sity from William Clements, a Univer-
sity graduate and former Regent.
Clements, who went on to become a
wealthy Bay City industrialist and
banker, donated the building and his
own collection of historic documents in
1922.

MICHIGAN CREW
AND THE
AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY
PRESENT THE
2nid ANNUVAL
ROW- A- THOAI
WHERE: THE DIAG
COME OUT TODAY AND SUPPORT
THE AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY
AS WELL AS
YOUR MICHIGAN ROWING CLUB
ALL DONATIONS ACCEPTED

The Great Pyramid
is coming to Ann Arbor!

Universityproperty thefts on the rise

EPICUREAN GOURMET TAILGATE

(Continued from Page 1)
THERE ARE many ways someone could have got-
ten into the offices of the Bureau of School Services
and stolen a typewriter this weekend. The Bureau
moved into a new set of rooms in the School of
Education Building, and were still in the process of
having locks put on the doors.
"It could have been anyone from the outside, we
had a lot of visitors this weekend," said Kent Leach,
director of the bureau.
"They did choose a good typewriter. I know they
probably scouted around the whole building and
probably scouted around the whole campus," he ad-
ded.
IT APPEARS that people have access to the

buildings, said Elaine Harden, assistant dean in the
College of Engineering. When Harden left her office
in the West Engineering Building there were two IBM
Selectrics sitting on the desks. When she returned
the next day they were gone.
"People have keys to get into the building," Harden
said. "I think they have fallen into the wrong hands."
In one case, Stevens suspects a thief represented
himself as a University Plant department employee
coming to pick up some office etjuipyment for repair.
"We haven't developed any solid evidence for suspec-
ts yet," Stevens said, but he added that staff mem-
bers should check for proper identification when con-
fronted with this type of situation.

r j
l fi
Watermelon filled with fresh

PARTIES

DISCOUNTS FOR:
Fraternities
Sororities
Alumni

Campus research issue cools for a
(Continued from Page 1) with a hesitation not apparent last year. ANOTHER ques
decided to postpone a vote until Sep- Several MSA members Tuesday night students is whether
tember. But they were no better criticized the $1,000 allocation for an in- money will accompli
prepared to decide last month than they vestigator, saying that the money could Gittelman: "Last ye
had been earlier in the summer and op- be better spent on areas with more good work, but the
ted to let a committee study the matter direct application to students. anything with the info
until March. Other students -a
THE STUDENT-run investigation Even some of the students who were a something will get d
*hat prompted the faculty's con- part of last year's protest group are Davis, the MSA mem
sideration of the issue fizzled out in May more hesitant this year. MSA member hiring a new resear
after Bret Eynon-who MSA hired to Julia Gittelman said she doesn't think year's work laid the
study the University's military ties- there is anyone who can fill Eynon's tion this year. "T
left campus. shoes. "Without anybody quite as good among some of the f
Now the new members of MSA have as Bret, I'm not sure if anything more research under revie
decided to resurrect Eynon's work, but will get done," she said. "The issue of m

while
tion facing the
all the time and
ish anything. Says
ar, they did a lot of
ey still didn't do
ormation."
re more hopeful
one this year. Ben
nber who proposed
cher, believes last
groundwork for ac-
here is pressure
aculty to put more
w," Davis says.
military research
to many people,
eon'e is actively in-
ded.

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whether or not som
vestigating it," he ad

Don't Let a Bad Break
Disrupt your College Budget
Whether it's an intramural football injury or a surprise attack of appendicitis,
an unanticipated sickness or accident can result in large medical bills.
And if you're like most college students, your budget doesn't allow for any
"bad breaks."
That's why it's a good idea to help protect yourself against the medical
expenses of an unexpected sickness or accident by enrolling now in the
1982-83 Accident and Sickness Insurance Plan, approved by the MSA for
University of Michigan students and their dependents.
Underwritten by Mutual of Omaha, this plan provides hospital-surgical
protection for covered sickness and accidents - plus benefits for X-rays,
lab tests, ambulance and even major medical expenses.

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