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September 24, 1982 - Image 11

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-09-24

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SPORTS

The Michigan Daily

Friday, September 24, 1982

Page 11

PEDALS FROM NEW YORK TO ANN ARBOR

Journey a trialfor

M' bicycler

LITIMORMERICAICENTI
with
SUMI P6IZ
Folkways recording artist
Tradicional Y Nueva Cancion
and
.RUPO OUC.O. R.EMTINO
Traditional Argentinian Dances
PENA at the HALFWAY INN
Residential College (Church St.)

By DOUGLAS B. LEVY
It was 7:10 a.m., Sunday, August 29.
The sky was blue, the sun was bright.
And as the warmth of the morning air
hithisface, his arms, and his legs, Eric
Berman was on his way.
The Big Apple was dead silent on this
Sunday morning. It would be several
hours before those on Manhattan's up-
per west side would arise to face this
glorious day.
YET BERMAN was pedalling with
his usual strength. From 52 Riverside
Drive (77th Street), along the Hudson
River to the George Washington Bridge
(177th Street), across the bridge via the
pedestrian walkway and into New Jer-
sey. Berman was off to a flying start,
his destination was Ann Arbor.
Berman, a sophomore, is the
president of the University of Michigan
bicycle club. He decided in mid-July

that he would make a seven day trip
from his home, in Manhatten, to Ann
Arbor. "I wanted to prove to myself
that I could do it, I wanted to test my
inner-self," explains Berman.
Despite the fact that none of his
friends believed he could make the trip
("they all thought that I would die," he
said) Berman's ride was a smashing
success.
EACH MORNING he would start
riding by 7:15, pedal for an average of
twelve hours, and look for a hotel to
spend the night in. At times Berman
suffered from boredom and loneliness.
"It got so lonely that I counted dead
animals (along the side of the road) to
keep myself busy," said Berman.
Berman spent his nights is some vin-
tage towns: Hawley and Wyalusing,
Pennsylvania; Corning and Niagara
Falls, New York; and Delhi and
Tilburv. Ontario. On September 4.Ber-

man entered Michigan and by 3:30
p.m. had reached hisgnew home, East
Quad. He was, to say the least,
euphoric.
After his studies, which Berman con-
fesses to be "minimal", he will be
devoting a good portion of his time to
turning around the bike club, a club
which has suffered in recent years.
"THE MAIN PROBLEM is that
people don't hear about the bike club
until it's too late, and the weather is
turning bad. Then, when it gets nice in
April, everyone is studying for finals
and getting ready to leave for the sum-
mer," said Berman.
Currently, the club has ap-
proximately 50 paying members (dues,
are $4 per year), and Berman is looking
to expand membership by scheduling
weekly rides and other participatory
events.
"There are several thousand bicycles
on campus, and Michigan is a school
with a great deal of spirit. If enough
people would get involved, the success
of this club would become a reality,"
said Berman.
BERMAN HAS an idea which he sees
as a sure fire way to generate spirit and
enthusiasm towards the bike club-the
creation of a bicycle race along the lines
of the "little 500", which takes place
every spring at Indiana University.
However, Berman cautions that, this
idea isn't even near the planning

stages.
Those who have seen the movie,
"Breaking Away", are familiar with
the races. A 50-mile race comprised of
teams representing fraternities and,
perhaps, other organizations. Indeed,
the creation of such an event might
spur training and enthusiasm towards
the sport of bicycling throughout the
long winter.
While such a project would seem im-
possible to accomplish, to Berman it is
a challenge worth pursuing. And a
bicycle race through Central Campus,
is certainly a worthwhile goal for the
bike club.
AS FOR THE immediate future, the
club offers a number of cycling oppor-
tunities. Besides the weekly rides (led
by Berman), the club offers time trials,
a fully equipped repair shop, a 10 per-
cent discount at Ann Arbor Cyclery,
and rollers for indoor training.
The club will hold a meeting every
Wednesday night at 8:00, at 1084 East
Engineering. The weekly rides are ten-
tatively scheduled for Thursday after-
noons beginning at 5:00 p.m. For in-
formation concerning the club, Berman
can be reached at 764-4687.
For the bike club to be successful,
Berman stresses that, "people must get
involved early." Eric Berman and the
bicycle club have a great deal to of-
fer-go see for yourself.

Saturday evening, Sept. 25th

8 p.m.

$4.00

4-
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1982
R
10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
WASHTENAW COUNTY HAIRDRESSERS ASSOCIATION
44kHGANAL .1P AL.
BENS17"
U. K SFR RWN $
2dP E * A EKN F V TW(aW AR iFI
* a- '-NN A MICP GAN
$ 0eFORC )RMO

AM/FM WALKMANS $19.00
Cassette WALKMANS $30.00
Mini Cassette Recorders $32.00
FM Stereo Cassette WALKMAN $48.00
Full Feature Stereo Clock Radio $30.00
Full Audio line at comparably great prices
Sold at RAGS TO RICHES,
1218 S. University, next to Campus Theatre
Every Friday, 6-10 p.m. only
Come this Friday-with ad for 5% discount

Daily Photo by BRIAN MASCK
Eric Berman shows the form that enabled him to pedal from New York to
Ann Arbor earlier this month. Berman is president of the Michigan bicycle
club.

Namath
arrested
TAMARAC, Fla. (AP) - Former
Super Bowl hero Joe Namath, apparen-
tly "in good spirits" according to one
officer, was charged with driving under
the influence of alco l in this Fort
Lauderdale suburb yesterday.
Tamarac police said Namath, 39, a
retired pro football star with the New
York Jets and Los Angeles Rams, was
boisterous and uncooperative, refusing
to take sobriety tests after Sgt. John
Purdy stopped him on Commercial
Boulevard.

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h.

The Vice President for Academic Affairs
B. E. Frye
will hold a public forum for
concerned members of the community
to comment on the recommendations
regarding the
Institute for Labor and
Industrial Relations
Wednesday, September 29
1:00-3:00 p.m.
Regents' Room,
C M1 N A M./ wN+FA.. D , MJ r

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