100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 09, 1982 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-09-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

Page 18-Thursday, September 9, 1982-The Michigan Daily
Schools, non-academic units studied for cuts

School of Art
The School of Art, with a 1981-82 fiscal
2 w.get of $1,384,685, an enrollment of
and a professional staff of 33, is the
sijallest ofpthe four schools slated for
r iew.
The review committee is looking at,
among other things, the quality of the
:pool in comparison to peer in-
stitutions, private art schools, and art
iftstitutes. The panel will also assess
!oiether the school's geographic
isolation from the world's major
;qultural centers has any significance.
--New Student Edition Associate
Editor Lou Fintor compiled these
descriptions of the departments un-
der review.

SEVERAL alternatives to the present
organizational structure of the art
school are also being considered. They
include: the feasibility of merging the
school with another unit such as the
Department of Art History, the
realignment of the design components
with architecture and/or engineering
colleges, eliminating the professional
degree program, and reducing the sub-
fields currently offered within the
curriculum.
The School of Art has existed in its
present form since 1974 when it split
from the former School of Art and Ar-
chitecture. Since then, the School of Art
has offered a number of programs in
the visual arts including photography,
painting, lithography, ceramics, and
industrial design, among others.
As a result of 1981 budget conferen-

ces, several areas needing im-
provement were identified by ad-
ministrators, including expanding to
accommodate 600 studgnts, and a
library.
THE REVIEW committee is ex-
ploring the issue of underfunding and
whether the school can maintain
quality and at the same time undergo a
budget cut.
Art School Dean George Bayliss has
made attempts to "open up" the review
process to students with the aim of
calming fears by sponsoring public
forums involving students, faculty, and
administrators.
University administrators hope to
have the review completed by the end
'of the fall term. Members of the review
subcommittee, however, say that it
may take longer.
School of
Natural Resources
The School of Natural Resources was
targeted by administrators in a review
that will examine the amount and
quality of research, low entrance
qualifications of students, and the ex-
tent to which courses overlap with other

it

u
Fzvag,kgjak tauzaiit
FEATURING:
" Large Breakfast Menu Anytime
" Hot & Cold Sandwiches
" Omelettes
" Everyday Luncheon Specials
" Deluxe Greek Menu (Tues &Thurs.)
" Sunday Special Dinner - $4.75S
)pen lam to 9pm 761-5699
334 Maynard-Ann Arbor, Michigan
10, S1 E

University offerings, among other
issues.
The School of Natural Resources has
a 1981-82 academic year budget of
$2,295,870, an enrollment of 853 studen-
ts, and a faculty of 41. Administrators
expect the review to be completed by
the end of fall term.
THE SCHOOL offers both graduate
and undergraduate programs. The un-
dergraduate program stresses an in-
tegrative approach to man in relation to
managing environment. The school
administers a master's program in
several areas including ecology,
fisheries and wildlife, forest resources,
regional planning, and landscape ar-
chitecture.
The school has consistently ranked
among the top five nationally, but
faculty members maintain that during
a review, ranking can mean little.
Following the review announcement,
Natural Resources Prof. Ronald Drob-
ney said, "Geography was excellent
too. We hope we're not going to be put
out in the cold like geography."
THIS YEAR the school celebrated the
100th anniversary of the founding of the
school's forestry program, which grew
into a department in 1927, and a School
in 1950.
School of Natural Resources ad-
ministrators say that there has been a
decline in enrollment at the school but
not a lower quality of student, which
was questioned in the review commit-
tee's charge.
The School of Natural Resources also
offers a doctoral program and several
joint degree programs. But quality of
program and research continue to
emerge as the main focus of the review
process, in keeping with the spirit of the
reviews.
School of
Education
The School of Education has a 1981-82
academic year budget of $5,780,688, an
enrollment of 1,494 students, and a
faculty of 72. The School of Education
Welcome to Unisex
at
DASCOL4 STYLISTS
Liberty off State .......... 668-9329
East U. at South U........662-0354
Arborland............... 9719975
Maple Village............ 761-2733

F,

4

Daily Photo by DOUG McMAHON
A STUDENT from the School of Education entertains two pre-schoolers at
a local day-care center. Education is one of three schools being reviewed this
fall for large budget cuts or elimination.

le do all

the work.

administers undergraduate and
graduate programs.
Before the announcement of the
review, the school was already
preparing a reorganization plan that
would consolidate its 13 programs into
six divisions. The plan would decrease
the number of faculty members to
around 60 in five years.
School of Education staff members
maintain that a recent decline in
enrollments has been brought on due to
waning interest by students desiring to
enter the education field. But, op-
timistically, they expect the decline to
turn around as increasing birth rates
will put elementary school teachers in
greater demand.
AS WITH the other schools under
review, program quality, student

I Al- -

a

s
e

N

I ' i
I

i
, I
I ('

I
E
i
' f
i I

Iilj I
II

Just fill out the RUSH SLIP below
(or pick one up in the store), and
hand it to one of our clerks.
Voila! Your books will appear.
No searching shelves and pawing
through stacks looking for the
right book.
We maintain an up-to-date
list of required texts. And, of
course, any changes will
bring a cheerful exchange
or refund (even for dropped
courses). Just return the
book with a receipt and in
the same condition
as purchased.
And how much does this
service cost? Nothing. We
guarantee it. If our prices
aren't competitive, we'll
refund the difference at
any time within two weeks.
What more could you ask?

quality, and research productivity are
among the issues being considered.
The School of Education also offers
programs on the Flint and Dearborn
branch campuses.
As a result of 1981 budget conferen-
ces, the School of Education assessed
their needs as follows: faculty salaries,
new equipment, clerical and support
salaries, funding to launch a self-
supporting continuing education
program, and the hiring of more faculty
members. A total of $590,000 was
requested for additional support for
these and other programs.
Another issue in the review is the
special status of the school's Depar-
tment of Physical Education. Although
the department is considered a part of
the'School of Education, it works under
a separate budget. The University ad-
ministration asked the subcommittee
evaluating the school to not review
physical education except for matters
that pertain to the school as a whole.
The administration's charge asked
whether the physical education depar-
tment should remain within the school
under the present administrative
arrangement or whether consideration
should be given to placing the depar-
tment on "the same administrative and
budgetary status as the other depar-
tmental units."
Rackham School
of
Graduate Studies

I

! I I
.1*}

I

coupel
hOI

The Horace H. Rackham School
See SCIIOOLS, Page 22

of a

11

_

NOTE: Please specify if you want new books.
Our clerks are instructed to provide
the best quality used books available
(and we've got a lot of 'em).

w . E t t!

KusM

SLIrv

LIST COURSE NUMBER
DEPARTMENT INSTRUCTOR COURSE NO. SECTION NO.

AT ANY
SAGEBRUSH® STORE
Present this coupon for 10% off any regular
price merchandise. Coupon not valid on
weekly sale items.
ONE COUPON PER TRANSACTION
COUPON EXPIRES: OCT. 15, 1982
* LEVI'S*
: LEE*
" JORDACHE*0
* GENERRA®
* CALVIN KLEIN*
MobI
uIA~ I

WAKE
UP'
C o
Call 764-0558

_ ___ 1 __ _

r

I ,

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan