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September 09, 1982 - Image 17

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-09-09

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, September 9, 1982-Page 17,

Anti-nuke activists
shout and squirm

By SCOTT STUCKAL
When half a million people demon-
strated in New York last June against
the proliferation of nuclear weapons,
some 200 members of the crowd had
traveled from Ann Arbor.
That's not quite as many as one might
expect to make the trip from this one-
time haven of liberalism. But times
have changed, as have students and the
movements which they support. The
Vietnam protest era is but a faint
memory from childhood for most
college undergraduates.
"PEOPLE ARE used to the idea that
political peace actions are always done
on campus, and that's not the way it
should be," said Tom Hayes of the In-
terfaith Council for Peace. "You are
getting more and more mainline people

like physicians, businessmen, and a
tremendous number of church people
who are supporting the freeze," he said.
"In the '60s my brother and I would
have gotten my mother into (the peace
movement)," said Sara Hathaway, an
Ann Arbor resident and junior at Pen-
nsylvania's Bryn Mawr University,
"but she got me into it."
Stopping nuclear weapons "is a mat-
ter of survival for our children," said
Sara's mother, Mary Hathaway. Both
Hathaways went to the New York rally,
which was the first time either had at-
tended a protest.
ALTHOUGH the nationwide protest
tends to overshadow campus activism
on the issue, the grass-roots anti-
nuclear weapons movement does have
its supporters at the University.

More than 100 anti-nuclear activistg
squirmed on State Street in front of thl
LSA building last April, mocking thO
disaster warning siren which blasts for
a few minutes every month. The "die2
in," which has become a popular fad in
many communities around the country,
is the demonstrators' way of expressing
their feelings abut living in constant
fear of nuclear devastation.
"It's very important that we make
people aware that every second we are
only 15 minutes away from destruc-
tion," said Liz Galst, a student
organizer of the protest. But, she ad-
ded, "you should never lose your sense
of humor, even when you're dealing
with something as serious as nuclear
weapons."
See ANTI-NUKE, Page 20

Daily Photo by DEBORAHLEWIS
WHEN THE DISASTER warning signal atop the LSA building blared last March, scores of students dropped to the
ground and "died," mocking what it will be like when "the big one" really comes. The protestors said they would be
back again this fall. But if they show, the siren may not sound if city officials try to quell the demonstration again.

Debate on Pentagon research to continue

(Continued from Page 13)
detonation and explosions for the Air
Force and Army.
And Senior works under Air Force
ponsorship on projects dealing with
adiation and electromagnetic energy.
One ongoing project involves the study
of what the effects of a nuclear ex-
plosion would be on the interiors of Air
Force jets.
Another Senior study, according to
both Eynon and Air Force research of-
ficers, could lead to the development of
"invisible" airplanes, in the sense that
the vehicles would be invisible to radar.
Such technology is commonly referred
o as Stealth technology.
ALL THREE faculty members deny
that they are working directly on
weapons systems. They say that their
projects involve the very fundamentals
of the science on which they are
working. The links to weapons systems
made in their project statements are
put there more to justify their work to
Congress than anything else, they
maintain.
High-ranking Air Force research of-
*icials, when contacted last year by the
Daily, supported Eynon's position that
the Air Force funds these projects with
military intentions in mind.
But the faculty members say
statements made by the Air Force may
not reflect the entire picture. While
they admit 'that there' may be some
weapons applications of their research
in the future, the professors add that
their studies for the Pentagon " are
similar to work in any of the technical
*ields.
Critics of defense research "don't
understand that if you come up with a
better computer program, you can
eventually use that for a weapon, too,"
Nicholls said. In fact, several military
divisions sponsor computer software
work at the University, and the results
of such work could be used for either
improved weaponry or any other com-
puter technology.
HADDAD SAID his work is as appli-
*cable to airport radar systems as it is to
any military use. Nicholls said his work
aids in understanding the principles of
detonation, whether it is used by in-
dustry or the Pentagon. Senior also said
his, work has many civilian ap-
plications, adding that if he had made
any significant contributions to

weapons systems, the Air Force would
have "clapped a classification on the
work."
In late April, when the Senate
Assembly took up the question of
military research for the second time,
some members of the faculty took
strong positions for one side or the
other, but most seemed confused by the
whole issue.
The faculty approved a resolution to
extend the University's research
guidelines to include unclassified
research. The Regents' policy refers
only to classified research. Research
administrators had said that the
guidelines always were presumed to in-
clude unclassified work, regardless of
the technicalities of the official policy.
THE TOUGHER question of how to
review unclassified projects for their
potential destructive capacities,
however, brought about some hot
debate but no resolution.
The faculty and student Research
Policies Committee recommended that
the present review mechanism- in-
volving department chairpersons,
deans or directors, and the vice
president for research-be maintained,
"but the responsible parties should be
reminded of their responsibilities in
light of the (University) policy."
(Charles Overberger, vice president for
research, sent out such a reminder in
May.)
James Crowfoot, a professor in the
School of Natural Resources, however,
submitted an alternative proposal
asking that an independent committee
be set up to review proposals. The
,Assembly decided to table any action
on the review question until its Septem-
ber meeting. But it is doubtful that the
faculty will be any closer to a resolution
this month.
SENATE Assembly Chairman
Ronald Bishop, a professor of internal
medicine, said he would like to see a
campus forum on the issue to bring the
two sides closer together.
The two mainstays of the student
movement on defense research last
year-Eynon and former MSA
President Jon Feiger-have since left
campus, and a replacement with as
much enthusiasm for the issue as those
two has yet to show up.

But Henry Rice, one of the students
involved last year, said, "There are
other people in the community who
won't let the issue die." MSA plans to
hire a part-time researcher to replace
Eynon, Rice said.
Students, faculty, and administrators

alike agreed that the student interest in
the issue stimulated greater sensitivity
to the difficulties involved in military
research. The tough questions concer-
ning possible changes in University
policy, however, are still a long way
from being resolved.

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U.S. officials find sex bias
in 'U' athletic department

THRU SATURDAY 8:30 A.M.,
P.M., TUESDAY THRU FRIDAY AT
NOON.
Kodak paper...
fora good look.

(Continued from Page 13)
The athletic department said it has
not been allowed to spend as much
money on recruiting women athletes
because of tight AIAW restrictions.
"The AIAW stresses that recruits pay
*their own way to campus," said
assistant athletic director Bob
DeCarolis. "NCAA rules say that I can
fly a kid in from Florida and put him up
in a hotel."
IN RESPONSE to the government's
conclusion that female athletes have
less opportunity to receive coaching
than male athletes, University officials
said that the coaching opportunity was
equal because many men's coaches are
contracted to spend considerable time
fund-raising, which involves no contact
with their players.

Women's coaches spend more of their
contracted time in actual contact with
athletes, the University said.
"The opportunity (to receive
coaching) is equal," said DeCarolis,
who called the charge "pretty vague."
The University also attacked the
charge that women's coaches are less
experienced, saying that women's
athletics have not been prominent long
enough for its coaches to gain experien-
ce equivalent to men.
Rather than finding women coaches
with long years of experience, the
department looks for people who it
thinks will help the teams best, said the
athletic department's assistant direc-
tor for women. "It's not just the quan-
tity of the experience," said Assistant
Director Phyllis Ocker, "it's also the
quality."

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