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April 03, 1982 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-04-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

0

ARTS
The Michigan Daily Sunday, April 4, 1982 Page 8

Dancing for

masters

Records

By Tania Blanch
W ATCHING Nancy Lanier dance is
invigorating. Watching her
choreography is equally exciting. The

INDIVIDUAL THEATRES
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combination of the two made her
graduate thesis dance concert, for a
brief but special hour, quite a success.
Featuring works by Lanier, as well as
guest choreographers Willie Feuer and
Alan Lommasson, Friday's perfor-
mance at the Dance Building Studio
Theatre provided a memorable evening
of dance.
The program was a well-balanced
collection of works. None of the pieces
were particularly heavy, and were
more often playful, even down-right
funny. Case in point: the crowd-
pleasing last dance, Elementary, My
Dear Watson. In proper Keystone cops
style, Lanier sent six Sherlock look-
alikes scurring about the stage after;
POETRY READING
Monday, April 5,8 p.m.
Ruthie of the Bat:
RUTH BRADLEY opens the
season with baseball verse.
GUILD HOUSE-802 Monroe
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769-1300
argaIn Shows $2.50 Before 3 PME

clues, to the great amusement of the
audience.
Lanier performed only in the pieces
choreographed by Lommasson and
Feuer. The Feuer dance came in four
morsels, interspersed through the
program. The movement in Black Bir-
ds falling from the edge ghost softly in-
to gloomlight (this being the four titles
run together to make a "dance senten-
ce") was minimal. But Lanier has the
presence to carry it off.
Lommasson's choreography in the
second dance called for quick, liquid
movements, which seemed to suit
Lanier perfectly. Particularly im-
pressive were the leaps and throws in
which Lanier literally soared through
the air, weightlessly, only to be pulled
to earth by Lommasson.
The outstanding piece of the evening
was Eyes in the Night, which opened
the program. Set to jungle-like music
by Eberhard Weber, this dance took its
inspiration from a Rousseau painting of
the same title. As mysterious creatures
of the night, the four dancers prowled
about the stage, warily, yet assured of
their animal prowess.
The choreography by Lanier incor-
porated very fluid as well as darting
movements to recreate theaatmosphere
of the jungle - dark, succulent,
frightening, and terribly exotic. The
lighting, costuming, and makeup were
perfect, carrying out the jungle theme
without resorting to over-play. Unfor-
tunately, Eyes was disappointingly
short. Particularly noticeable was
Carol Teitelbaum's svelte, panther-like
dancing. Her body is well-suited to the
flowing, feline regalness demanded by
Lanier.
As a dancer, Lanier has the strength
and grace, moving easily between
athletic and lyric styles. As a
choreographer, she extends this
strength and grace to her dancers. Her
dances include a full range of
movement, from graceful airborn leaps
to angular pench arabesques.
Lanier fills the whole stage with dance,
building crescendoes and surprising the
audience. Watch for her in the future;
Lanier is a very promising performer.

John Hartford - 'Cata-
logue' (Flying Fish)
Pick-a-little, talk-a-little (and fiddle-
a-little): that's been John Hartford's
way of making undeniably enjoyable
folk music for over fifteen years now.
Now, don't get turned off just because I
mentioned "folk music": these aren't
family sing-alongs or out-dated Joan
Baez "love-in" stuff; these are real
tongue-in-cheek beauties.
Catalogue is a collection of represen-
tative Hartford works, new and old, in-
cluding many from back when the
singer-guitarist-banjo (ist?)-fiddler was
recording for RCA and Warner
Brothers.
Hartford does everything himself on
these tracks, from the foot taps (the
percussion alternative) on his Shure
545's to the gutteral imitation of the
classic Westinghouse clunker ("Good
Old Electric Washing Machine Circa
1943"). His instrumental indulgences
are generally quite good, although his
fiddling doesn't always quite match his
banjo or guitar talents (the violin solo
"Kiss My Plywood", however, is worth.
a few sessions, if only for the title).
It's Hartford's plain yet often witty

and endearing lyrics which really
makes Dialogue a winner. From "Up
On the Hill" ("Where they do the
boogie") to "California Earthquake"
("And they say the fault line/Runs
right through here"), the singer lets go
simply and surely. Not always tongue-
in-cheek, either ("Natural to be Gone"
is kinda pretty, actually).
All in all, a nice album. Makes ya
wonder a little why people turned away
from the stuff in first place, goin' for
that gosh-darned loud electronic rock
music. No, really. Nice.
-Ben Ticho
Frank Zappa-You Are
What You Is-Barkin
Pumpkin Records
Frank Zappa is angry - as usual.
Zappa's latest treatise in social
angst, You Are What You Is, rips up the
planks of '80s America much like his
60's albums did 15 years ago.
In the meantime, Zappa's records
have become meandering and un-
focused with obtuse ravings about
sexually oriented poodles. But -You

Are What You Is has the straight-from-
the-hip focus and power one expects
from a talent of Zappa's stature.
When Frank routinely intones
"Remember, there's a big difference
between kneeling down and bending
over," the fine line between submission
and servitude attacks the listener's
ears and sensibilities.
Of course, Frank manages to spread
manure over all sides of the political
spectrum using a tight, varied jazz-
rock fusion that expands on the Sheik
Yerbuti sound.
Perhaps it is because of Frank's
straightforward focused lyrics, biting
to the point of absurdity, that this.
album has gotten virtually no radio air
play outside of Zappa strongholds in:
New York and Connecticut. Perhaps it
is because the musical effort, like on all
Zappa albums, is daring, intelligent;
varied and (surprise!) fun. And maybe
it's just because the sapheads who rule
radio in Detroit and elsewhere are just
more concerned about dollars than
about quality. You may never
know-unless you listen to You Are
What You Is by Frank Zappa.
-Scott Stuckal

0

a

Awww, Poland's

not that bad

DEATH TRAP' is
Deadly Fun"'
-ANN ARBOR NEWS

,, I

BIAKf IODWARDS'

4:15
7:00
9:35

Who'll do it?
MICHAEL CAINE
CHRISTOPHER
REEVE
DYAN CANNON
DEATH

By Michael Huget
ANY OF MY stereotyped precon-
ceptions about living under mar-
tial law in Poland were shattered
Friday night after a lengthy discussion
with Jerzy Wojcik, assistant artistic
director for the Mazowsze Dance
troupe from Poland.
Currently on tour across the United
States and scheduled to appear in
Detroit this week, the troupe has been
met by small bands of protesters at dif-
ferent performances.
Although Solidarity member Wojcik
preferred to discuss the troupe and its
much respected and admired director,
Mira Ziminska, he did offer some
valuable insight into the current Polish'
political situation.
"After the 15th of January, all the

performances 'resumed and the
theaters reopened . . . everything is
back to normal."
But Wojcik did concede that as ar-
tists, they are viewed differently in
Poland. "We are just artists. What can
the people do, we have our own special
schools .."
The protests have been perplexing for
Wojcik.
"We don't see anything political in
singing 'I love you.' People are
protesting outside the theatres, and
then put their signs down and come in-
side to watch the show. I don't know
why some people are 'thinking so
strange.
"They say we are giving money to the
government, but we can't make much
of a profit on the road with all the ex-
penses.
"It isn't a material profit . . . though

our songs and dancing we are making
the people happy. This is a very human
profit."
About the protesters, Wojcik added,
"Poor people. They do ,what they
want-I can't say they can't do it."
Mazowsze was formed over 30 years
ago in an effort to preserve and
celebrate the vastness of the Polish folk
tradition.
"If it weren't for Madame (Mira
Ziminska), many traditions would be
lost," said Wojcik.
"Poland is not a rich country," he
added, "but very rich in culture. We
have over 40 theaters in Warsaw, and it
takes two to three years to get tickets."
The purpose of the troupe is simple,
Wojcik explained. "The music and dan-
ce should make friends with people. We
like to see ourselves making people
happy, then we are happy."

DAILY-7:15, 9:25 (PG) 4:151'_ _ __
,SAT, SUN--12:45, 2:55, 7:157
5:05, 7:15, 9:25 9:45 ®

Bicycle Jim's Restaurant
presents
TABLESIDE MAGIC
in the hands of
STEVE BILLER
Every Monday-6:00 PM-9:00 PM

THE

PUZZLE

By Don Rubin

We'd like you to identify
each of the titles in this inter-
national bookcase (da sinistra
a destra):
TOP ROW:
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
7)
8)
9)
10)
BOTTOM ROW:
11)
12)
13)
14)
15)
16)
17)
18)
19)
20)
21)
LAST WEEK'S SOLUTION:
The correct solution to
Cube Route is:
1-6-8-5-13-2-7-12-17
Of course, knowing the
answer and experiencing it
are two different things.
LAST WEEK'S WINNERS:
Diane Drutowski
Kathy Majeske

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Roger Jones

© 1982 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

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