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April 03, 1982 - Image 17

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-04-03

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The Michigan Daily-Sunday, April 4, 1982-Page 7

Storms slice tlru Midwest

By UNITED Press International
Scattered tornadoes and a "bizarre" near-blizzard
pummeled the South and Midwest yesterday, the
violent remnant of twisters and winds that crashed
through a triangle of more than a dozen states from
Ohio to Georgia and Texas, killing at least 32 people
and injuring hundreds of others.
Volatile thunderstorms spawned more than 70 tor-
nadoes late Friday and early yesterday from the
Mississippi Valley into the Tennessee and Ohio
valleys.
NEAR BLIZZARD conditions were reported
throughout western Michigan.

Probably the hardest hit area was Muskegon Coun-
ty, where strong winds blew in off of Lake Michigan,
knocking down power lines and leaving as many as
10,000 residents in the dark.
The Grand Rapids area was under a blizzard war-
ning yesterday afternoon and evening, as forecasters
predicted windy and cold conditions. Weather of-
ficials said the west Michigan area would receive up
to three inches of additional snow last night and wind
gusts of up to 60 miles per hour.
BUT WEATHER service officials said the threat of
flooding was minimal, as temperatures were expec-
ted fall below the freezing mark last night.

The deadliest storms in nearly 1% decades raked a
six-county area in Arkansas, killing 13 people, in-
cluding a family of five in Hope as they huddled under
a mattress.
Damge in Arkansas was estimated at $8 million.
RESCUERS SEARCHED for more bodies in a 1,200
-foot by 4-mile swath of destruction in Paris, a nor-
theast Texas city of 25,000, where 10 people were con-
firmed dead and more than 200 others injured.
A dozen skiers, including six members of the
University of California, Berkeley, ski team, repor-
ted missing when they failed to return from a six-day
trek through storm-ravaged Sonora Pass of the High
Sierra "skied out" unharmed yesterday.

New Salvador govt.
is still being formed

DIRECTORS SOUGHT
The University of Michigan Gilbert and Sullivan
Society seeks a dramatics director, music director,
scenic designer, and costume designer for its fall
1982 production. Shows under consideration are
Gondoliers, Princess Ida, and Sorcerer.

From AP and UPI
SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador- The
shape of El Salvador's next gover-
nment will depend on how badly the
rightist majority wants to roll back the
modest reforms instituted by the ruling
junta.
A week after hundreds of thousands
of Salvadorans ventured to the polls
despite continuing civil war closed door
talks are being held to determine
whether the U.S.-backed Christian
Democratic Party will participate in
the next government.
THAT WILL determine what track
can be taken in negotiating with or bat-
tling the leftist rebels who boycotted the
March 28 elections but failed to disrupt
them.
It also will affect the Reagan ad-
ministration's support for the
Salvadoran government in the 2/2-year-
old civil war that has cost more than
33,000 lives.
President Reagan said last week it
would be difficult to support a new
regime that retreats on any of the

reforms instituted over the past two
years by junta President Jose Napoleon
Duarte.
BUT THE first thing the rightist
alliance vowed was to exclude the
Christian Democrats from any gover-
nment unless they dismiss Duarte.
He has offered to step aside if it will
help El Salvador on the road to peace
and economic reconstruction.
The left was severely weakened by
the elections, when 1.5 million
people-more than twice what gover-
nment optimists predicted-ignored the
boycott call and turned out to vote.
UNTIL THEN, no one had known how
successfully the government controlled
Salvadoran territory. Guerrillas roam
through much of the countryside, and
voting was not held in 66 of the nation's
261 municipalities because of the strife.
Many voters said they went to the
polls to avoid possible government
reprisals. But there was an excitement
and good cheer in the long lines of
voters that could not be blamed on in-
timidation.

CANDIDATES SHOULD CALL 761-9622 AFTER 5:00P.M.
Messages can be left at 761-7855 any time of day or night.

--y

Thinking of Bung An English Teacher?
Professional Semester-EnglishDept.
ORIENTATION MEETING
Drop in any time between 4:30 and 5:30 p.m.
MONDAY, APRIL 5
7627 Haven Hall
For more information call
Alan Howes 662-9895 (Home); 763-2269 (Office)
TUESDAY LUNCH DISCUSSION
APRIL 6-12 Noon
"Repression and Resistance In Guatemala:
tend Sfruggle ofA Mayan Indian Village"
(WITH SLIDES)
Speaker: ELISSA MILLER,
U.M. Student who lived and worked in Guatemala for five years.

Bicycle in the sky
Either the thief was unsuccessful, or the rider decided to try a different ap-
proach to locking a bicycle. The airborne oddity was on S. Division between
Hill and Packard yesterday.

Fallout-shelter condos planned

At the International Center
603 E. Madison Street

I Lunch $1 .00
For additional information,
please call 662-5529

(Continued from Page 6)
.Large 2 room efficiency on Packard available May 1,
fall option, $250,662-5510. 10U0401
SUMMER SUBLET-$75.00/room. Large 3-bedroom
'house one block from campus. 662-9751 after mid-
night or 6-7 pm. 18U0404
CAMPUS
AVAILABLE MAY 1
WE ARE CURRENTLY LEASING A FEW MOD-
E9RN EFFICIENCIES AND 1-BEDROOM APAR-
_MENTS FOR SPRING/SUMMER. FROM
$150/MO. STOP BY OR CALL DAHLMANN APAR-
TMENTS, 543 CHURCH, 761-7600.
cUtc
SUBLET: For 1 Female, share attractive 2 bedroom
apt., laundry, parking, a/c. Near Med. and Central
i-Campus. Ohly $70/month! 663-0073. 35U0406
Live in Luxury! 6 bedroom house on Hill near Law
and Business Schools. Large living and dining room.
Modern kitchen with dishwasher and disposal, 2 huge
attic bedrooms. Sundeck and porch. Plenty of
parking. $110/month. Call persistently. 663-0690, 994-
509,996-9470. dU0404
SUMMER SUBLETS
If you need a place for the summer
just call us-
' Modern Management provides a free subletting
service to our tenants . . . let us match you up
iyith them and end your search-we have lots to
choose from.
.Our list of low-priced sublets for spring & summer of
all sizes of furnished apartments is now available.
MODERN MANAGEMENT
668-6906 . 663-3641
"Quality is a bargain"
cUte
1,CAMPUS: One bedroom, furnished apt. No pets.
May-May lease. $300 plus utilities, 663-5861. 18Y0316
OWN ROOM IN NICE COED HOUSE
$118, garden. Call 662-5948 or 764-2430. 72Y0408
Female Roommates needed to share beautiful, 2-
tiedroom townhouse, $175/mo. 662-3578. 57Y0407
3 roommates needed to share large house. Cheap,
W separate rooms. Robert/Hal 665-6660. 14Y0410
Law students seeking 2 graduate or mature un-
Lr dergraduate women to share coed house on S. State.
Convenient, $200/month. Callafter 6 p.m. 662-3814.
12Y0406

LA VERKIN, Utah (UPI) - High in-
terest rates have crimped a developer's
plans to- sell fallout-shelter con-
dominiums costing from $26,000 to
$95,000 each, but hard times haven't
campened his enthusiasm for the idea.
Lane Blackmore, head of Survive
Tomorrow Inc., said company plans for
a fallout-shelter community near Zion
National Park have already been ex-
panded to include nationwide
marketing of "modular survival
shells." He said the units-'would, be

similar to condominium-type storage
sheds - but underground.
"We all love recreation and we all
have junk to store," said Blackmore.
"Why not build facilities for recreation
and storage that could be used for sur-
vival in case of nuclear war?"
Blackmore, a building contractor, got
into the survival condo business two
years ago while toying with an idea he
calls "free enterprise, civil defense."
He is convinced that nuclear war can be
survived-4bt it shouldn't be left to the

government.
"The government can't provide per-
sonal security, he said. "It can only
come up with a civil defense plan for
the average person."
All the units are equipped with sur-
vival gear and enough food for a year.
When complete, Blackmore said, the
community will have the latest in air
filtration equipment, an entertainment
center, a jogging track, a medical
clinic, and a militia-type guard force
composed of residents.

Co-Sponsored by: The Ecumenical Campus Center, The International Center,
Church Women Vnited In Ann Arbor.

uhe fop!

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featuring

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*
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; idual leases
pensive
heat dlud d
furn ed a arn

v.
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nenks

ndiv alA
idea cat,
withi
resta
video
clothir
books
travel

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two blocks
;rants, nigt
dames, fo~
igstores,
ores, pos
bureau.

of camp
oIc nd
off ice, I

is,
heater
ng,
ank,

1 or 2 female roommates for '82-'83
bedroom house. Call 662-9336.

to share three
36Y0404

I

GIANT FLEA MARKET
Every weekend 150 dealers. Household items, fur-
niture, antiques, bargains, plants. 6 pm-10 pm Fri.,'
10 am-6 pm Sat. & Sun. 214 E. Michigan at Park.
fDowntown Ypsilanti. 'cW121U
I ann I

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DOWNTOWN ANN ARBOR
ROOMS STILL AVAILABLE
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UNIVERSITY TOWERS

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