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March 26, 1982 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-03-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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TUESDAY, MARCH 30 8:30 PM MICHIGAN THEATRE
TICKETS ON SALE:
Michigan Theatre Box Office, 603 E. Huron, Ann Arbor
2-6 p.m., Mon.-Sat.
Hudson's, Wherehouse Records and all C.T.C. outlets.
The Comic Opera Guild, 432 S. Fourth Ave., Ann Arbor, MI 48104
GOLD PRICES ARE DOWN
Dear Customer,
k You can now purchase your 10 karat gold College Ring
,. 4o% . f . I - m nm . ' .o . ..ori as- i3 I f p+

ARTS
Page 6 Friday, March 26, 1982 The Michigan Daily

0

Clubs/Bars
The Ark (1421 Hill; 761-1451)
Tom Paxton performs tomorrow
night only at the Ark. This witty
singer-songwriter has proven he can
deal musically with relevant social
and political problems and write fine
ballads as well. The Folktellers
come to tell mountain tales and con-
temporary stories tonight.

Patrick Gardner and formed in 1859,
is often acclaimed as the finest male
chorus in the world. The Harvard
Glee club, directed by Jameson
Marvin, will perform selections
from its upcoming tour of China. For
more information, call 764-4718.

Theater
Prpfessional Theatre
Showcase Series

Program

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tormc less;i mone~ty uuinanyou wwo naJIIve jpaY.aasi year
at this time.
.- TAHE6L /

For more good news, all Ultrium Rings will be offered at
$20.00 off the regular retail price during this promotion.

K

Your Herff Jones College Ring Specialist

TO ORDER:
Date: March 26 Time: 11-3
Place: Follett's Michigan Bookstore
322 S. State Street
Deposit required: $20.00

y . ..- .4~.,E F O

The Blind Pig (208 S. First; 996-8555)
The popular rhythm and blues of the
Blue Front Persuaders is featured
tonight and tomorrow.
Joe's Star Lounge (109 N. Main;
665-JOES)
Tonight and tomorrow Joe's
features Steve Nardella in his last
Ann Arbor appearances before
heading west to that eternal smog
hole, Los Angeles.
Rick's American Cafe (611 Church;
996-2747)
Funk/reggae with Gypsy Fari from
Chicago. Tonight and tomorrow.
University Club (Michigan Union,
530 S. State; 763-5911)
Jazz/blues artist Walter Hamilton is
featured tonight.
Concerts
University of Michigan and Harvard
Glee Clubs
The two oldest glee clubs in America
come together for a concert tonight
at Hill Auditorium. The University
of Michigan Glee club, led by Dr.

Getting Out, Marsha Norman's
award-winning drama about the im-
pact of prison life on a young woman
trying to cope with the day-to-day
pressures of living on the "outside,"
runs through Saturday and then
again next Thursday through Satur-
day in the Trueblood Theatre. 764-
0450 for more information.
Common Ground Theatre
False Promises, a colorful musical
farce written by the San Francisco
Mime Troupe, runs through Sunday
night at the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre. This uproarious play takes
place in a small mining town in
Colorado at the.turn of the century,
and the script is based on true
stories of how the members of the
community-chicanos, blacks, and
whites-came to "common ground"
in their attempt to form a union. 994-
5455 for more information.
UAC
A variety of original comic and
satirical sketches are performed by
the Sunday Funnies troupe tonight
and tomorrow. 763-1107 for more in-
formation.

a

University . of Michigan
Theater

Opera

L. L.J Ll LJ LJ

Two one-act comic operas, Gian
Carlo Menotti's The Old Maid and
the Thief and Puccini's Gianni
Schicchi, will be performed through
the weekend at the Power Center.
764-0450 for more information.
-compiled by Michael Huget-

Daily Photo by DIANE WILLIAMS
Arlene (M. J. Czernik), just released from prison, cannot forget Arlie
(Pauline Gagnon), the wildcat that she used to be in 'Getting Out.'
'Getting Out' a
trium...phant play

'ThFCCFhR, tltCHIlGAN 'DIR~t~bR {HARVARD~
AIVALA6LE ARCH ,2- )6 98a- 5f m HILL AUDIfORIUMA N XOFF~.

By Elliot Jackson
OTBTLESS VERY few people in
Ann Arbor realize or care that
Showcase has produced Getting Out. As
is the fate of most Showcase produc-
tions, it will attract little attention
beyond its usual circle . of ap-
peal-theatre and drama students,
critics, friends, and family of cast
members-and will shuffle off this mor-
tal coil mostly unnoticed by the greater
part of our august citizenry.
And this is really too bad-in fact,
this unhappy fate is almost obscenely
undeserved, at least in the case of Get-
ting Out, for despite such potentially
crippling factors as the dreadful "im-
provements" wrought in the Trueblood
Theatre, Showcase has managed a tiny
triumph of sensitive and passionate
stagecraft. Getting Out is, unassuming
and unpretentious though it is, the
Theatre Department's best show this
season.
What has taken place with this
production is that most felicitous and
rare of combinations: a director has
thought long and hard, and has ended
up actually understanding what the
play means; and a group of actors
whose talents are eminently suited to
successful realization of their charac-
ters have been willing to take direction.
The challenge central to the
play-that of presenting a girl and a
woman who are the same person, but
played by different actresses-was met
with marked success. Both M. J. Czer-
nik (Arlene) and. Pauline Gagnon
(Arlie) played their characters for-
cefully and with conviction, and made
them utterly convincing: Arlene as the
woman whom prison has drained of all
vitality and self-confidence, and Arlie
as the uncontrollable, guileful, sassy
brat who; is harrowingly vicious and

pathetic by turns-at times, even
simultaneously.
Arlene and Arlie are two different
people, but what is even more impor-
tant is that they are' the same person,
and the triumph of this production is
that the two. actresses, individual as
each of their performances were,
managed so effectively to evoke and
recall the other halves of their charac-
ters.
In Czernik's every line and gesture,
we could see where Arlene had come
from, and upon occasion, flashes of-the
ferocity and determination that were*
Arlies. . In Gagnon's portrayal was
Arlie's brashness and defiance, her
vulnerability, and ultimate defen-
selessness and lack of certainty, in
which are the seeds of the woman she
becomes. Both actresses are to be
commended for exceptionally
distinguished performances.
The other characters were for the
most part as well-realized as one could
dare hope for, if upon occasion a little
unfathomable-mostly because the ac-
tors seemed more concerned with
maintaining their Southern accents
than with the overall clarity of their
enunciation, and so a good deal of what
their characters said was open to
speculation. Lucis Poirier (Mother)
and Brian Colgan (Carl) were the worst
offenders in this regard, which is too
bad because of what these. two charac-
'ters say is at least interesting, and at
most, crucial to the action of the play
The only other real quibble one might'-
have as far as the acting goes is that the
figures of authority-the Doctor (Wen-
by Wright), the School Principal (Dar-
cy Gingerich), and the Warden (Robert
Striker)-all were somehow ineffec-
tual, lacking any vestige of menace or
even the forcefulness that one would
expect to find in persons of their
positions. Perhaps this was a conscious
See GETTING, Page 7

The Department of Philosophy
The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
announces
THE TANNER LECTURE PROGRAM, 1981-82
March 30 & 31
THOMAS SCHELLING
The Lucius N. Littauer Professor of Political Economy
The John F. Kennedy School of Government
Harvard University
The Tanner Lecture on Human Values
"Ethics, Law and Policy Toward
the Problems of Self-Command"
Tuesday, March 30, 3:30 p.m.
Modern Languages Building, Aud. 3
812 E. Washington

SYMPOSIUM ON THE
TANNER LECTURE
Wednesday, March 31
Michigan League, Hussey Room
227 S. Ingalls

9:15 a.m.-
12:30 p.m.

John Elster
Historisk institutt

_I

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