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March 26, 1982 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-03-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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" The Michigan Daily-Friday March 26, 1982-Page 5

UAW council backs
new GM contract

_

CHICAGO (AP) - The United Auto
*Workers union's General Motors Corp.
council voted overwhelmingly yester-
day to recommend rank-and-file
ratification of a concessions contract
that would protect jobs and save the No.
1 automaker $2.5 billion over the next 30,
months.
Union GM Vice President Owen
Bieber told a news conference 299 of the
324 council members voting recom-
mended adoption of the contract.
"I. THINK that the unamimous ap-
proval by the top bargaining committee
and the council here speaks well for the
agreement," Bieber said. "The reac-
tion of the council was very good, very
positive. There was an excellent spirit'
of unity, of goodwill among the
delegates."
The union has scheduled meetings for

Tuesday and Wednesday in Chicago to
explain the tentative pact to local union
leaders from around the country.
Bieber said "we hope to compete this
ratification vote by Easter weekend."
In addition to recommending the
pact, the council could have recom-
mended that the rank and file reject the
contract or could have passed it onto
the membership without a recommen-
dation.
GM AND THE UAW reached ten-
tative accord on the pact Sunday. Un-
der the plan, GM's 320,000 U.S.
autoworkers would face a wage freeze,
give up nine paid personal holidays per
year and defer their June, September
and December cost-of-living -allowance
increases.

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Pentagon strengthens
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(Continued from Page 1)
DANIEL ATKINS, Acting Director of
the University's Center for Robotics
and Integrated Manufacturing, said
about 60 percent of the Air Force grant
would be to train graduate students. He
added that he believes all research
originating from the grant would be
publishable.
:Other federal agencies, such as the
Nationaf Science Foundation, cannot-

provide the large sums of money taht
the University's robotics center is
looking for, Atkins said, simply because
of their tight budget.
The NSF, has already promised
$400,000 over the next two years, as part
of the initial funds for CRIM. The NSF
also recently announced that it had
awarded a four-year, $700,000 grant to
the University of Rhode Island for the
establishment of a new robotics center.

"LET'S GET PIJYSICAL...
SRAELI STYLE!"

A New Face
The controversial facade of the new Taco Bell on East University receives
finishing touches yesterday. Residents have voiced discontent with the
restaurant's appearance, claiming that it is unsightly.

Pro ram cuts proposed
(Continued from Page 1) within the university or release
S Affordability- How affordable are "at least a year's notice," accor
department proposals, and how do they Feeman.
fit state appropriations for Oakland? Reduced state appropriations a
The phasing out of programs is plan- the sole reasons for the cuts, F
ned to begin this fall. Students who now said. "They just made us move
have majors in the targeted areas will faster."
be allowed to complete their studies, Students and faculty of Oa
and faculty members-most of whom located in the Detroit subu
are part-time-will either be relocated Rochester, are very upset abo

at Oakland U.
d with cuts, according to Jackie Houston,
ding to news director of the student newspaper.
The students are still "confused about
are not what the report means," Houston said.
eeman Jane Briggs-Bunting, chairperson of
a little the journalism program, said that
although none of the department's 17
kland, faculty members, have received
irb of notification of layoffs, she is fighting
ut the the proposed cut.

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4

v

Job outlook bright

(Continued from Page 1)
Carroll said that last year, 25 percent
of the school's master's graduates and
52 percent of its bachelors graduates
accepted jobs in Michigan.
"I SUSPECT, however, there will be
a significant change in the percentages
this year. It will definitely be the non-
manufacturing segment that will hold
up the statistics this year," she said,
*adding that industries in this area have
been the heaviest recruiters this year.
According to Carroll, the economy
has left its greatest mark on the
manufacturing segment, especially the
automotive and metals industries, and
the placement office is beginning to feel
the effects.
Union
groups air
grievances
(Continued from Page i)
cooperative Council, which also has of-
fices on the Union's fourth floor, said
"the point is, we don't want to have
catering services, we want to do it our-
selves." She pointed out that the ICC's
kitchen meets Union health codes.
Cianciola added that the food service
employs many students who would be
hurt by further reductions or the
closing of the caterers.
The food service is now operating at a
loss, Cianciola said, although the losses
are less than half what they were a year
ago.
When one student- mentioned that
donuts from the food service cost 50
cents each, Cianciola responded, "The
fact that we're a (student) union
doesn't let us escape the financial
responsibility of being a business."
When some students at the meeting
pointed out that Michigau ma, a secret
University fraternity, often brings its
own beer to meetings, and several mon-
ths ago threw a disposable keg out their
sixth-floor Union Window, Marc Dann,
chairperson of the Union Board of
Representatives, said "blatant
disregard of the rules' will not be
tolerated."

"Auto is s
specific need
they're not c
numbers any
recruiting," sl
GEORGE
college recrui

for business grads
till coming in, but for "tapering off, particularly in Michigan
Is in specific divisions- and the Mid-western regions," accor-
oming in for dthe (big) ding to Carroll. She explained that
'more, but they're still public accounting is traditionally an
rhe saidb area with high turnover rates, but that
VALSA,supervisorof this year the shrinking number of cor-
iting for Ford Motor Co., porate positions has slowed the tur-
."^''+ nover.

' _ N .

____
4..
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contirmean tatr Ford is continuing to
recruit, but on a smaller scale.
"We are lookir g for fewer peopleTONIGHT Th SY
these days as compared to five or 10
years ago. We're looking for a few good
people, for fewer numbers, but good
people," Valsa said. - ICND
Public accounting, a high-demand 9455
field during the past few years has beenLiet
y,

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