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March 21, 1982 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-03-21

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The Michigan Daily-Sunday, March 21, 1982-Page 3

'HAPPENINGS-
SUNDAY
HIGHLIGHT
The Committee Concerned With World Hunger, PIRGIM, and the Inter-
faith Council will begin a series of educational workshops for World Hunger
Week today, at 7:30 p.m. in the Pendleton Room of the Union. Hunger
educator, author, and scientist George Borgstrom will discuss the dilemma
at the end of the century.
FILMS
Cinema Guild-The Sea Gull, 7p.m., Lorch.
Mediatrics-Gone With the Wind, 4, 8 p.m., Angell Aud. A.
Ann Arbor Film Co-op-Black Peter, 7 p.m., MLB 4.
PERFORMANCES
Reader's Theatre Guild-"Illusions," 2 p.m., R.C. Aud., E. Quad.
School of Music-Percussion recital, Dan Armstrong, 2 p.m.; piano
recital, Stephanie Leon, 4 p.m., Recital Hall; trombone/Saxophone recital,
Gordon Good and Thomas Reed, 4 p.m., Stearns; piano chamber music
recital, 6 p.m., Recital Hall; violoncello recital, Michael Sedloff, 6 p.m.
Stearns; trumpet recital, Robert Howard, 8 p.m., Recital Hall; horn studen-
ts recital, 8 p.m., Stearns; Michigan Youth Chorus, 4 p.m., St. Andrew's
Episcopal Church.
University Dance Company-Spring concert, 3 p.m., Power Center.
Canterbury Loft-"You Can't Hurry Love," 3, 8 p.m., 332 S. State.
Ark-Sallyu Rogers plays dulcimer, banjo, guitar, 8 p.m., 1421 Hill St.
Stearns Collection Series-William Maim plays exotic wind instruments of
Asia, 3 p.m., Stearns.
Center for Western European Studies-Bert Hornback reads W. B. Yeats,
accompanied by Irish music from Greg Ross, 8:30 p.m., The Earle.
SPEAKERS
Russian & East European Studies-Carl Proffer, "The Influence of Con-
temporary Russian Writers on the West," 2 p.m., Rackham Amph.
Kelsey Museum-Gallery Talk, Ann Van Roosevelt, 2 p.m., Kelsey.
MISCELLANEOUS
Rec. Sports-Family Funday Sunday, 2-4 p.m., NCRB.
WCBN-African Rhythms: Traditional and contemporary music from the
African continent and diaspora, 1-3 p.m., 88.3 FM.
Hillel-Jewish Cultural Assoc. of E.Q., Deli Dinner with discussion on in-
termarriage/interdating, 6 p.m., E.Q. Rm. 164; Israeli Dancing, 7-10 p.m.,
1429 Hill.
Friends of Traditional Music-Square dance with the New Prairie Ram-
blers, 8 p.m., Union.
GEO-Meeting, 4 p.m., Room C, Third Floor League.
Center for Fine Woodworking and Craft Arts-Workshop, spraying
finishes, 4-6 p.m., 537 SAB.
WSDS-"Milt Wilcox Sports Review," 1480-AM.
MONDAY
HIGHLIGHT
The Campus Nuclear Freeze Committee will throw a party today at 3:30 in
the Michigan League, Vanderburg and Concourse Rooms, to kick off the
local nuclear freeze campaign.
PERFORMANCES
Trotter House & Eclipse Jazz-Improvisation workshop, 8:30 p.m., Trot-
ter House.
Guild House-Poetry and Prose readings, David Victor and Gary Zebrun
reading translations of Akhmatova, 8p.m., 802 Monroe.
Airmen of Note-Official jazz band of the U.S. Air Force, 8 p.m., Rackham
Aud.
SPEAKERS
South and Southeast Asian Studies-Ernesto Arellano, "The Struggle of
Filipino Workers," 8 p.m., 200 Lane Hall.
English Language and Literature-F.L.S. Lyons, "Yeats and parnell," 4
p.m., W. Conf. Rm., Rackham.'
Chemical Eng.-Paul Belter, "Biochemical Product Recovery
Technology Prospectives and Prognosis," 2 p.m., 3107 E. Eng.
Chemistry-Inorganic Sem., Melvin Luetkens, "Synthesis and Chemistry
of Some U (IV) and Th(IV) Organometallics," 3 p.m., 1200 Chem.; Spec.
Inorganic Sem., Karen Wetterhahn-Jennette, "Inorganic Carcinogens:
Chromium and Nickels" 4p.m., 1200 Chem.
Biological Sciences-Pamela Dunsmufr, "Organization and Expression of
the Genes for Chlorophyll A/B Binding Protein and the Small Subunit of
Carboxylase," 4 p.m., 1139 Nat. Sci.
Committee Concerned with World Hunger-Hunger Week, Eleanor Jositas

speaks on domestic hunger of elderly and mothers, 7:30 p.m., Pendleton
Rm., Union.
Communication-Brown Bag Sem., Chris Sterling, noon, 2035 Frieze.
MISCELLANEOUS
United Students for Christ-Meeting, 6 p.m., Union.
Christian Science Organization-Meeting, 7:15 p.m., 3909 Union.
Amer. Chem. Soc./Students-Free tutoring for Chem., 7-9 p.m., 3005
Chem.
Tau Beta Pi-Free tutoring math and science, 7-11 p.m., 307 UGLi; 8-10
p.m., 2332 Bursley.-
Cinema Guild-Japanese Film Series, Fires on the Plain, 7 p.m., Lorch.
CRLT-Workshop for TAs, "Visual Thinking in Learning Process," 7-10
p.m., 109 E. Madison.
Hillel-Suzanne Benton, workshop with masks, 7:30 p.m., 1429 Hill.
IFC, Panhellenic Assoc. -Greek Week, A Greek Sing, 7 p.m., Hill.
SACUA-Meeting, 1:15 p.m., Pres. Conf. Rm., Fleming Admin. Bldg.
Recycle Ann Arbor-Spring orientation, 7:30 p.n, Conf. Rm., Public
Library.
Indoor Light Gardening Soc.-Meeting, "Carnivorous Plants," 7:30 p.m.,
Matthaei Botanical Gardens Aud.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of:
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI. 48109.
SOMETHING FOR SENIORS-
March 27, 1-3 p.m. in the PENDLETON ROOM, M-UNION
Sponsored by the STUDENT ALUMNI COUNCIL (SAC)
Speakers will focus on:

Reporter assesses women's

jobs

By FANNIE WEINSTEIN
Career opportunities for women do
exist,-it's just up to women to take
adantage of them, ABC-TV News
Correspondent Carole Simpson told an
audience of more than 200 people
yesterday during her keynote address
at Ann Arbor's sixth annual Women's
Career Fair.
"Anything worth having is worth
struggling for, and a lot of you are going
to have to struggle," she said. "Nobody
is going to hire you anymore because
you're a woman. Those days are gone.
No one cares any more."
SIMPSON, a 1962 University
graduate, began her career in
television in 1970 as a reporter and
weekend anchorperson for WMAQ-TV
in Chicago. She became a Washington
correspondent for NBC-TV in 1974, and
jumped to ABC just last month.
Simpson said the greatest career ob-
stacle she faced has been racial and
sexual discrimination. "I had three
strikes against me," she said. "I was
black, inexperienced, and a woman and
it's true, I was all of those things."
After having the honor of being the
only graduate of the journalism depar-
tment's class of '62 not to receive a job
offer, Simpson said her luck began to
change during' the civil rights
movement of the '60s.
"My color and sex," she said, "which
had been liabilities, were now very at-
tractive ... I am still to this day, trotted

'Nobody is going to hire you anymore because
you're a woman. Those days are gone. No one
cares any more.'
-Carole Simpson
ABC'-TVNews Correspondent

out as the double token. I'm a two-fer."
Although she amused the audience
with humorous Washington anecdotes,
comparing Congress to the television
show "Laugh-In," Simpson stressed the
negative effects on women of Reagan
Administration policies.
Women, the poor, and minorities
are the hardest hit by Reagan's budget
cuts, according to Simpson, who
claimed these groups are the most
dependent on the social service
programs undergoing cuts and
elimination.
"All of these facts paint for us a pret-
ty bleak picture," she said, - noting
Reagan's opposition to the Equal
Rights Amendment and abortion.
Simpson also condemned Reagan for
having no female Cabinet members,
and for appointing only 43 women to the
367 executive administration positions
available.
It is crucial for women and minorities
to become' politically active, Simpson
told the group, complaining of poor
voter turnout.

"We can blame ourselves for a lot of
the problem. We have to stick
together," she said. "We must do it. We
can do it."
Letter-writing and lobbying cam-
paigns are both effective forms of
protest, according to Simpson. "There
are many in Washington who believe
Reagan is still on a movie set," and are
questioning whether Reagan is calling
the shots or whether he is being told
what shots to call," she said.
"I think the honeymoon really is over
and I think you will see Congress exert
a lot more power on the President than
it has in the past," Simpson said.
More than 25 groups-including the
University's Career Planning and
Placement Office and the Affirmative
Action Office-sponsored the fair,
which featured workshops and panels
on topics such as training and develop-
ment, job interviewing, and sales and
marketing.
"It gives women access to other
women out there in careerstthey've
probably never explored," said Denise

Bristol, coordinator of minority
programs for Career Planning and
Placement.
Bristol described the fair as an
"outreach type effort," which is more
intensive than regular career planning
services, and provides positive role
models for those who take part.
LSA sophomore Leslie Gluck said she
was particularly interested in the
workshops concerning job-finding
strategies and careers in social change.
"I thought I'd get a few tips as far as
jobs and finding jobs," she said.
Karen Seiple of Ypsilanti, a business
administration graduate of Bowling
Green University in Ohio, said she
came to the fair seeking pointers on the
fields open to women.
"It's difficult these days to get infor-
mation, especially when the times are
hard, on where there are opportunities
for women to advance," Seiple said.
EUROPE AND BEYOND!
Traveling the open road.
Freestyle. There's something
about it that means the best
experiences you'll ever have.
That's the kind of vacation
we're offering you.
Take a modem coach, add
young people from all over the
world, and hit the road.
And you have over thirty
options of which road to hit:
the glamour cities and c'olorful
villages of the real Europe, the
Greek Islands, Scandinavia,
Russia, the Middle East, Africa,
India....city to city, detail to
detail, adventure to adventure.
Call or write for our free full
color brochure.
-
IN'ER COLLEGIATE HOLIDAYS INC.
501 Madison Avenue
New York, N.Y 10022
(212)355-4705
E I
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about AdventureWorld 821
Name_ __
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Telephone
ISchool ___________

Human dignity rally calls for unity

(Continued from Page 1 )*
"democracy, civil liberties, and human
equality."
The neo-Nazis, Bullard said,
represent a "vicious, degrading past.
We must constantly reaffirm our strong
faith in each and every one of us and
believe that we can triumph in love
against hate," he said.
Other speakers included state Sen.
Ed Pierce (D-Ann Arbor), former
Mayor Albert Wheeler, and Elaine Pitt.

v v V 4L/

president of the Jewish Community
Council of Washtenaw County.
Rick Lederman, 18, said he came
from Farmington Hills to demonstrate
with his brother, a University student.
"We're not going to take what they (the

neo-Nazis) are giving us, sitting down,"
he said.
Special presentations also were given
by the folk music group Gemini, the
Common Ground Theatre, and the.
children of two Holocaust survivors.

r . . iv* w . c. ..ew w.. _

-qqm-

Castro
ordered
increase
in arms,
shipments
WASHINGTON (AP)- Cuban
President Fidel Castro ordered in-
creased arms shipments to the
Salvadoran guerrillas last December in
an attempt to disrupt the March 28 elec-
tions in El Salvador, the State Depar-
tment said yesterday.
"Within the past three months, ship-
ments of arms into El Salvador reached
unprecedented peaks, averaging out to
the highest overall volume since the
"final offensive" last year, the depar-
tment said in an eleven-page public
report entitled "Cuban and Nicaraguan
Support for the Salvadoran Insurgen-
cy."
DEAN FISCHER, the chief State
Department spokesman, said the
Reagan administration will not disclose
the intelligence evidence on which the
report was based because "a gover-
nment that does not keep secrets does
not receive them."
The report is the latest ad-
ministration attempt to demonstrate
Cuban and Nicaraguan control of
revolutionary forces in El Salvador.
Fischer insisted that the "cumulative
weight" of classified and publicly
available evidence "makes clear that
the guerrilla movement in El Salvador
receives vital assistance of many kinds
from an international infrastructure
outside El Salvador."
THE STATE Department report
issued yesterday states that intelligen-
ce reaching Washington is consistent
with.a two-year pattern of guerrilla ac-
tivity and foreign support and "Cuba
played a major role in developing this
support system, and remains its key
link."
U-M ROWING
CLUB RAFFLE
KERO SUN portable heater: Nooshin Serai
LUGGAGE:O.Juma
DINNER for 2 at the EARLE: Richard Beringer
OSCAR PETERSON TICKETS: Borge Hadsel
OSCAR PETERSON TICKETS: Thoch Ngo
DINNER far2 at the WHIFFLETREE: Claude Rowe
DINNER for 2 at the PRETZEL BELL:
John Bogema
AM-FM CLOCK RADIO:Larry Szoina
ULRICH'S SWEATSHIRT: Bill Flom
DINNER for 2 at MAUDE'S: Cindy App
HAIRCUT at the HAIR CUT HOUSE:
Gail Fitzsimmons
HAIRCUT at the HAIR CUT HOUSE:
Karen Smith
HAIRCUT at the HAIR CUT HOUSE:

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1982
ANN ARBOR
ANTIQUARIAN BOOK
FAIR AND SALE
MICHIGAN UNION BALLROOM
SATURDAY, MARCH 27
10AM - 5 PM
More than 30 Midwest dealers
Admission free
Ann Arbor Antiquarian
Bookdealers Association

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FOR

time: l0am"4pm

' place: di%
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OPPORTUNITY FOR STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS TO
VELY DEMONSTRATE WHAT THEY DO AND WHAT
ARE ALL ABOUT.

I
I
I
I
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AN
ACTI
THEY

If you have any questions, call
763-3241) or Janine Shahinian (SOAP:

Lisa Mandel , Doris Gurke
763-5900).

(MSA

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