100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 21, 1982 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-03-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4

Page 2--Sunday, March 21, 1982-The Michigan Daily

NOW HIRING. SUMMER CAMP S TA F
DAY CAMP AND RESIDENT CAMP
Both in Cleveland Suburbs
" Sports Counselors/Counselors-Specialists-W.S.I.'s
" Advanced Life Savers " Cooks-Assistant Cooks-
Supervisors
Call or write for an application: HALLE PARK OFFICE
3505 Mayfield Road
Cleveland, Ohio 44118
(216) 382-4000 Exts. 246-148
Were you closed out of the Dorm Lotey?
.1
UNIVERSITY TOWERS
now has the winning numbers!

Daily Photo by JON SNOW
HARLEY SHAIKEN of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology addresses
a crowd of 650 yesterday at "Robots and High Technology: A New Direction
For Michigan?" Shaiken stressed the need for public input in high
technology decision-making in Michigan.
Economic ipact of hi-tech
eXarned at 'U' conference

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Space shuttle launch rehearsed
WHITE SANDS MISSILE RANGE, N.M. - While work crews
graded the runway after a heavy dose of desert winds, space agency officials
prepared yesterday for a dress rehearsal of the space shuttle's first landing
here.
The rehearsal actually will be three tests in one. The first rescue
simulation will be as if the shuttle had a normal landing. The second will be
as if the shuttle had a problem on the landing strip, such as broken landing .
gear. And the third will be as if the shuttle missed the strip and the rescue
must be carried out by helicopter because of rough terrain.
Columbia embarks tomorrow on what its pilots term the "ultimate test
flight," a mission to advance the ship toward cargo-carrying journeys later
this year and to demonstrate it is a reliable, on-time transport to space.
Walesa kept from baptism
WARSAW, Poland - Poland's martial law regime has barred interned
Solidarity leader Lech Walesa from attending his daughter's baptism Sun-
day, his wife said.
Walesa's wife, Danuta, said on the telephone yesterday that her detained
husband won't be allowed to travel to the Baltic port of Gdansk for the
christening of Maria Victoria, who was born Jan. 27. Walesa has never seen
the baby.
"These are not humans, these are devils. the father won't be there. I am
in despair. I have no hope that he still may come," Mrs. Walesa said, sob-
bing.
Jobs, profit plague auto talks
DETROIT- Profit sharing and the fate of seven doomed auto plants
remained the key issues keeping the United Auto Workers and General
Motors bargainers from reaching agreement yesterday on a new con-
cessionary pact, the union's chief negotiator said.
UAW Vice President Owen Bieber told reporters at a late afternoon
briefing the two sides had reached agreement on several more points of the
contract and were very close to signing a section dealing with the company's
practice of subcontracting work to foreign and non-union sources.
Plane crash kills 27
WONDER LAKE, Ill.- Search crews, tramping through "snowy fields on
foot and horseback yesterday, recovered the bodies of all 27 people killed
when a military jet crashed in a ball of fire.
The Illinois National Guard KC-135 tanker exploded during a thunder-
storm and crashed from a height of 13,000 feet Friday night, scattering
wreckage over four miles of northern Illinois, said Air Force Lt. Col. Duane
Swimley.
Officials said 23 of those aboard were Air Force Reserve passengers. The
bodies were taken to a temporary morgue at the McHenry County court.
complex.
The plane was nearing the end of its flight when it exploded and crashed in
swampy fields 50 miles northwest of Chicago, but it was not known if the
weather had anything to do with the crash. The National Weather Service
said the storm was not particularly severe.
Reagan vetoes ol bill
WASHINGTON- President Reagan, maintaining that Americans have
been hurt by past efforts to allocate fuel supplies, vetoed a bill yesterday
that would have given him power to allot crude oil supplies and impose price
controls in cases of severe shortages.
The bill, which replaced emergency powers that expired last year,
required the president to draw up an emergency plan within 180 days for
dealing with severe petroleum disruptions, such as the 1973 Arab oil em-
bargo or the 1979 Iran-Iraq war.
It gave the president sole discretion over whether the plan would be im-
plemented, and would have expired Dec. 31, 1984, or 20 days before the end of
Reagan's term.
Reagan said he sympathized with the idea of trying to prepare for energy
disruptions, but insisted it was invalid to assume that "giving the federal
government the power to allocate and set prices will result in an equitable
and orderly response to a supply interruption."

I

-accommodations starting at $10250

per person *

-your own bedroom from $ 15 000
-heat included-furnished apartments
-plus convenient location
UNIVERSITY TOWERS
South University at South Forest
the winning number: 761-2680
bae GIVE US A CALL! We Can Change Your Luck!
* based on 4 people in a2 bedroom apartment at $410/month.

(Continued from Page 1)
skilled workers.
"I've been to the 21st century, and it's
not all it's cracked up to be,"'Yudken
said. The Santa Clara Valley used to be
almost entirely devoted to agriculture,
he said, but "it is now completely
covered with ,cement and plastic, a
monument to a complete lack of urban
planning."
AS MORE people are attracted by
developing technology to the area,
Yudken continued, "the land values go
up very fast-it drives out the low-
income-type people.
"There really has to be a kind of
public planning process," he said.
"There's a need to create some kind of
forum, a community base. Unless that
happens, a few people with a lot of
power and a lot of wealth will be
making the decisions."
Specifically, Yudken gave four major
suggestions. A social impact analysis
needs to be developed; land use

questions must be raised; the problem
of displacement of low-income workers
must be looked at closely; and, toxic
waste possibilities need to be analyzed.
THE UNIVERSITY could be a useful
research instrument for this analysis,
Yudken concluded.
According to University Vice
President for Academic Affairs Billy
Frye, "The University'will best be able
to perform impact studies because it is
devoid of the profit motive." Frye ad-
ded, however, that "it does not appear
that robotics will change the level of
scholarship at the University."
Much of yesterday's conference was
devoted to the fact that few impact
studies have been developed.
SPEAKERS AT a workshop entitled
"Technology and Society: Alternative
Futures" considered other social im-
pact of robotics and high technology
development.,
"Our culture is fashioned on work,"
said University Prof. Frithjof
Bergmann, whose series on "Culture
After the Elimination of Labor" is
airing on Ann Arbor Public Access
television.
Bergmann stressed that to have no
work is to have no dignity, no worth,
and no income. "I've stood up to call on
you to help bring an alternative into
existence," he said, "to make visible,
make articulate, a future that at
present does not exist."
Daniel Atkins, associate dean for
research in the School of Engineering,
said that, in spite of the problems
facing the University and the state in
developing high technology, he sees a
bright future. "I would like to point out
my optimism that there is much good
that will come from this (new)
technology," he said.

;I

I

DELICATESSEN
Delicious Corned Beef, Jewish Rye, Kaiser Rolls, Latkes, Blintzes, Lox, Smoked
Fish, Decker Sandwiches, Soups and Salads, Eggrolls and Almond Cookies,
Farm Fresh Butter, Milk and Eggs.
Everybody's Favorite Ethnic Foods - Meats, Wursts and Cheeses
Stop To Shop, Eat With Us, Or Call Ahead for Carry Out
ENJOY OUR SUNDAY BREAKFAST

Vol. XCII, No. 134
Sunday, March 21, 1982
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The Univer-
sity of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during
the University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 49109. Sub-
scription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday mor-
nings. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7 by mail outside Ann Arbor.
Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER: Send
address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street. Ann Ar-
bor, MI 48109.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to United Press International.
Pacific News Service, Los Angeles Times Syndicate and Field Newspapers Sundicate.
News room (313) 764-0552, 76-DAILY. Sports desk, 764-0562; Circulation, 764-0558; Classified Advertising,
764-0557: Display advertising, 764-0554; Billing, 764-0550.

I

Complete Tray Catering for All Occasions

Open 7 am-8 pm
7 DAYS A WEEK
Call 663-DELI

422 DETROIT ST.
ANN ARBOR, MI

C AT HER INE
FVF
F U
KERRY- R
TOWN H
K INGSLEY-- E

__ E. Liberty 94

BUSINESS FORUM ON SOCIAL ISSUES V
Presents
RALPH NADER
"INCENTIVES FOR CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY"
8:00pm-TUESDAY, MARCH 23-FREE
HALE AUDITORIUM- SCHOOL OF BUSINESS.
(BALANCING VIEWPOINT TO BE PRESENTED AT A LATER DATE)
with special thanks to co-sponsors: MICHIGAN STUDENT
ASSEMBLY, BUSINESS SCHOOL
STUDENT COUNCIL, OFFICE OF
STUDENT AFFAIRS, AC, LAW
SCHOOL SENATE, LSA-ST(TDFENT

Editor-in-Chief ............ DAVID MEYER
Managing Editor......... PAMELA KRAMER,
Executive Editor.............CHARLES THOMSON
Student Affairs Editor ANN MARIE FAZIO
University Editor .......... MARK GINDIN
Opinion Page Editors .. ANDREW CHAPMAN
JULIE HINDS
Arts Editors............... RICHARD CAMPBELL
MICHAEL HUGET
Sports Editor .................... bOB WOJNOWSKI
Associate Sports Editors .............. BARB BARKER
MARTHA CRALL
LARRY FREED
JOHN KERR
RON POLLACK
Chief Photographer ................. BRIAN MASCK
PHOTOGRAPHERS: Jackie Bell, Kim Hill, Deborah
Lewis, Mike Lucas, Jeff Schrier.
ASSISTANT PHOTOGRAPHERS: Linda Kelley, Doug
MoMohon, Avi Pelosoff, Elizabeth Scott, Jon Snow,
Diane Williams.
ARTISTS: Norm Christiansen, Robert Lence, Jonathan
Stewart. Richard Walk.
LIBRARIANS: Bonnie Hawkins, Gary Schmitz.
NEWS STAFF: John Adam, George Adams, Jason
Adkins, Beth Allen, Perry Clark, Poe Coughlin, David
Crawford, Liso Crumrine, Pam Fickinger, Lou Fintor,
Steve Hook, Kathlyn Hoover, Harlan Kahn, indre
Liutkus, Nancy Molich, Mike McIntyre, Jenny Miller,
Amy Moon, Anne Mytych, Nancy Newman, Don
Oberrotman, Stacy Powell, Janet Rae, Lauren
Rousseau, Chris Saloto, Jim Schreitmueller, Susan
Sharon, David Spok, Lisa Spector, Bill Spindle, Kristin
Stapleton, Scott Stuckol, Fannie Weinstein, Barry Witt.
OPINION PAGE STAFF: Don Aronoff. Linda Bolkin.
Kent Redding, Nathaniel Warshay.

ARTS STAFF: Tonia Blanich, Jane Carl, James Clinton,
Mark Dighton, Adam Knee, Gail Negbour, Carol
Ponemon, Ben Ticho.
SPORTS STAFF: Jesse Barkin, Tom Bentley, Jeff
Bergido, Randy Berger. Mark Borowski, Joe Chapelle,
Laura Clark, Richard Demak. Jim Dworman, Louri
Foinblott, Mark Fischer, David Formon, Chris Gerbosi,
Paul 'Helgren. Matt Henehon, Chuck Joffe. Steve
Kamen. Josh Kaplan, Robin Kopilnick, Doug Levy,
Mike McGraw. Larry Mishki non Newman. Andrew
Oakes, Jeff Quicksilver, Sarah Sherber, George
Tonasijovich. James Thompson. Karl Wheatley. Chris
Wilson, Chuck Whittman.
BUSINESS STAFF
Business Manager ................. JOSEPH BRODA
Sales Manager.. . . .. .._...... KATHRYN HENDRICK
Operations Manager .. ......... SUSAN RABUSHKA
Display Manager ............ ....-ANN SACHAR
Clossifieds Manager ........... MICHAEL SELTZER
Finance Manager .. .. ........ . SAM SLAUGHTER
Assistant Display Manager ......... PAMELA GOULD
Nationals Manager . ........ . . LINDSAY BRAY
Circulation Monooger ........... . . .... KIM WOOD
Sales Coordinator............E. ANDREW PETERSEN
SALES REPRESENTATIVES: Wendy Fox, Mark Freeman,
Nancy Joslin, Beth Kovinsky, Coryn Notiss, Felice
Oper, Tim Pryor, Joe Trulik, Jeff Voight.
BUSINESS STAFF: Ruth Bard, Hope Barron, Fran Bell,
Molly Benson, Beth Bowman, Denise Burke, Becki
Chottiner, Marcia Eisen, Laura Farrell, Sandy Fricko,
Meg Gibson, Pam Gillery, morci Gittlemon, Jamie
Goldsmith, Mark Horita, Laurie Iczkovitz, Karen John-
son, Ada KusnetzGit Pillai, chantelle Portes, Dan-
Quondt, Pete Rowley. Leah Stanley, Tracy Summerwill.

t

PUBLICATION SCHEDULE
1982
JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
_ -2 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3

AM

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan