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March 10, 1982 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-03-10

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01

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1982-The Michigan Daily
Student apathy a key problem
in the upcoming MSA elections

By GEORGE ADAMS
Preventing apathy on the part of
voters and candidates alike is a major
concern of Michigan Student Assembly
election officials as they prepare for the
upcoming spring elections, according
to the election director.
Students must declare their can-
didacy by Tuesday, March 16, to be
eligible to run in the April 6 and 7 elec-
tions. At that time students will vote for.
the new MSA president and vice
president, along with the 35 represen-
tatives that make up the assembly.
ACCORDING TO MSA Elections
Director Bruce Goldman, last year's
elections were marked by "a terrible
amount of apathy." Out of about 35,000
students who were eligible to vote last
year, only about 4,500 did, Goldman
said.

The candidates' participation was not
much better, he noted. "The tendency
last year was for big campaign budgets
but no big campaigns." The entire
budget could be spent on advertising,
he said, "but actual campaigns have
lacked, and that's what gets people to
vote."
Right now there are several unfilled
MSA seats, he said, which happens
most often in the seats representing the
smaller schools or colleges. "When that
happens, we go to the government of
the school and ask them to nominate
someone," Goldman said. "If they
don't, the seat remains empty."
GOLDMAN SAID he thinks the elec-
tions this year will be more successful
than in the recent past. "The MSA has
been more public this year, and that
may spark more interest than before,"
he said.

ANY STUDENT who is currently
enrolled or was enrolled in the previous
term is eligible to run for a seat in the
school or college in which they are
enrolled, according to MSA election
rules. Students may run as independen-
ts or campaign as members of a cam-
pus political party. Candidacy forms
are available in the MSA office on the
third floor of the Michigan Union.
The MSA president and vice
president are elected together, by
popular University-wide vote. The
representatives are elected by students
from their own school or college. All
terms on the assembly are for one year.
LSA has 12 seats on the assembly,
Rackham graduate school has five, the
College of Engineering three, and the
College of Business Administration
two. All other schools and colleges have
one seat each on the assembly.

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rape aejen.4
By NANCY MALICH
Claiming that the University campus
is an "extremely high-risk area" for
rape, members of the city's Women's
Crisis Center will meet tonight to teach
University students how best to defend
themselves against sexual assault.
Barb Christensen, who is a staff
member of the crisis center and a
black-belt in karate, will instruct
women in basic self-defense techniques
and another staff member, Kathy
Thomas, will tell women of the dangers
of rape.'
"WE HOPE TO motivate women to
take assertiveness training or self-
defense classes," said Thomas.
Tonights' program is part of month-
long activities sponsored by the
Michigan Student Assembly designed
to promote greater awareness of
security problems and safety on cam-
pus.
MSA is sponsoring a number of
programs for what it calls "Security
Awareness Month," including an open
forum on security problems on March
18 and a "Security Day" in the Fish-
bowl on March 31.

se seminar
MSA PLANNED the activities after a
survey it conducted late last year
showed that most students wanted their
student government to address the
problems of campus security as a top
priority.
Christensen said nearly half of all
rapes are commited by persons who
know their victims, and women should
not therefore feel necessarily secure
with men who agree to escort them
home. One third of all rapes take place
in the homes of the victims, she added.
Thomas said all college campuses
are especially high-risk areas for rape.
She said precise statistics are very dif-
ficult to obtain about the number of
rapes committed in Ann Arbor because
most rapes are. not reported and
because many statistics vary and are
sometimes unreliable.
The Women's Crisis Center, which
was founded in 1972 and counsels
women with a wide variety of problems
ranging from domestic violence to in-
cest, has been offering rape prevention
workshops in sororities, University
dormitories, and other college cam-
puses since last fall, Thomas said.

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Haughey wins in Ireland
DUBLIN, Ireland- Charles Haughey regained control of the government
yesterday, edging incumbent Prime Minister Garret FitzGerald in a
parliamentary ballot after inconclusive nationwide elections.
With the support of five non-aligned lawmakers, including four socialists,
the 56-year-old Haughey was elected prime minister by a vote of 86-79 in the
Dail, the lower house of Parliament.
FitzGerald's coalition government fell in January in the throes of
Ireland's worst economic crisis since the state was founded in 1921.
Haughey was prime minister for 18 months before being ousted by Fit-
zGerald in a June 1981 election.
Cheers and loud applause rang out in the Dail as Haughey's election was
announced after weeks of backroom maneuvering.
Parents may sue over closings
MINNEAPOLIS- The School Board's decision to close 17 of the city's 79
elementary and secondary schools-forcing some 8,000 more students onto
buses-has prompted some angry parents to consider legal action.
"Some of the parents are resigned. Others are angry. I haven't run into
anyone who really likes the plan," said Merrill Anderson, executive
secretary of Save Our Schools, which opposes the closings.
He said yesterday that SOS has two attorneys studying a possible court
challenge, adding: "The decision has already been made that we will take
legal action."
SOS argues education and neighborhood identity will suffer. The group
may request a hearing before the Legislature or state education depar-
tment, Anderson said, or may ask a federal court to determine whether the
district is conforming to a court-ordered desegregation plan in effect since
1972.
Police disperse protesters,
grab TV crew in Guatemala
GUATEMALA CITY- National police and army troops fired automatic
weapons and lobbed tear gas grenades yesterday to disperse 1,000 people
protesting what they considered widespread ballot fraud in the presidential
election, witnesses said.
Police and soldiers grabbed an ABC television crew, including reporter
Geraldo Rivera, beat them, shoved them into a police van and whisked them
from the scene, the witnesses said.
A U.S. Embassy spokesman said the mission was trying to intercede on
behalf of the newsmen.
Witnesses said a line of riot police confronted the protesters on a street
about 300 yards from the main plaza in front of the National Palace, where
opposition party candidates planned to give speeches against alleged fraud
in Sunday's elections.
UAW drafts AMC counteroffer
MILWAUKEE- The United Auto Workers yesterday worked on a coun-
teroffer to a rejected American Motors' plan for employees to invest a slice
of their paychecks in a $1 billion product development program that could
save jobs.
"We don't know when the counteroffer will be ready. The various locals
are meeting. When they are finished, we hope to present it to the company,"
a union spokesman said.
A negotiator for AMC, which lost $197.5 million last year, said he hoped an
agreement could be reached this week.
Vidal to run in Calif.
LOS ANGELES- Author Gore Vidal, characterizingDemocratic fron-
trunner Gov. Edmund Brown as the "Lord of the Flies," formally announced
his candidacy yesterday for the U.S. Senate seat-being vacated by S.I.
Hayakawa.
Vidal, calling himself a "peace candidate," was the fifth democrat to
challenge Brown for the nomination.
Vol. XCII, No. 124
Wednesday, March 10, 1982
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The Univer-
sity of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during
the University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 49109. Sub-
scription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday mor-
nings. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7 by mail outside Ann Arbor.
Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER: Send
address changes to.THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street. Ann Ar-
bor, MI 48109.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to United Press International.
Pacific News Service, Los Angeles Times Syndicate and Field Newspapers Sundicate.
News room (313) 764-0552, 76-DAILY, Sports desk, 764-0562; Circulation, 764-0558; Classified Advertising,,
764-0557: Display advertising, 764-0554: Billing, 764-0550.

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Editor-in-Chief......................DAVID MEYER
Managing Editor ................ PAMELA KRAMER
Executive Editor .............. CHARLES THOMSON
Student Affairs Editor ........... ANN MARIE FAZIO
University Editor..................MARK GINDIN
Opinion Page Editors .......... ANDREW CHAPMAN
JULIE HINDS
Arts Editors..................RICHARD CAMPBELL
MICHAEL HUGET
Sports Editor .................... BOB WOJNOWSKI
Associate Sports Editors .............. BARB BARKER
MARTHA CRALL
LARRY FREED
JOHN KERR
RON POLLACIK
Chief Photographer .................BRIAN MASCK
PHOTOGRAPHERS: Jackie Bell, Kim Hill, Deborah
Lewis, Mike Lucas, Jeff Schrier.
ARTISTS: Norm Christiansen, Robert Lence, Jonathan
Stewart, Richard Walk.
LIBRARIANS: Bonnie Hawkins, Gary Schmitz.
NEWS STAFF: John Adam, George Adams, Joson
Adkins, Beth Allen, Perry Clark, Poe Coughlin, David
Crawford, Lisa Crumrine, Pam Fickinger, Lou Fintor,
Steve Hook, Kathlyn Hoover, Harlan Kahn, Indre
Liutkus, Nancy Malich, Mike McIntyre, Jenny Miller,
Amy Moon, Anne Mytych, Nancy Newman, Dan
Oberrotman, Stacy Powell, Janet Roe, Lauren
Rousseau, Chris Solota, Jim Schreitmueller, Susan
Sharon, David Spok, Lisa Spector, Bill Spindle, Kristin
Stapleton, Fannie Weinstein, Barry Witt.
OPINION PAGE STAFF: Don Aronoff, Linda Balkin.
Kent ReddingNathaniel Worshoy.

ARTS STAFF: Tania Bionich, Jan. CortJomes Clinton,
Mark Dighton. Adam Knee, Gail Negbour, Carol
Poneman, Ben Ticho.
'SPORTS STAFF: Jesse Barkin, Tom Bentley, Jeff
Bergido, Randy Berger; Mark Borowski, Joe Chapelle,
Laura Clark, Richard Demok, Jim Dworman, Lauri
Fainblatt, Mark Fischer, David Forman, Chris Gerbasi,
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Kamen, Josh Kaplan, Robin Kopilnick, Doug Levy.
Mike McGraw, Larry Mishki . ron Newman, Andrew
Oakes, Jeff Quicksilver, Sarah Sherber, George
Tonosijevich, James Thomplon, Karl Wheatley. Chris
Wilson, Chuck Whittman.
BUSINESS STAFF
Business Manager ................. JOSEPH BRODA
Sales Manager..... ........KATHRYN HENDRICK
Operations Manager ............ SUSAN RABUSHKA
Display Manager.. .. .-..............ANN SACHAR
Classifieds Manager ......... . ... MICHAEL SELTZER
Finance Manager ................. SAM SLAUGHTER
Assistant Display Manager ......... PAMELA GOULD
Nationals Manager ................ LINDSAY BRAY
Circulation Manoager.................KIM WOOD
Sales Coordinator ............ E. ANDREW PETERSEN
SALES REPRESENTATIVES: Wendy Fox, Mark Freeman,
Nancy Joslin. Beth Kovinsky, Caryn Notiss, Felice
Oper. Jodi Pollock, Tim Pryor, Jeff Voigt.
BUSINESS STAFF: Hope Barron, Fran Bell, Molly
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. Horita, Karen Johnson, Ada Kusnetz, Gito Pillai, Don'
Quandt, Pete Rowley, Leah Stanley, Hildy Stone,
Tracy Summerwill, Joseph Trulik, Mary Ellen
Weinberg.

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PUBLICATION SCHEDULE
1982

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