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February 03, 1982 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-02-03

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The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, February 3, 1982-Page 3

Rock, not bullet, hit Bush's car

From AP and UPI
WASHINGTON - A "loud bang"
punctuated Vice President George
Bush's trip to the office yesterday mor-
ning, creating brief excitement - but no
injuries -as something creased the roof
of his armored Cadillac.
Riot squads assembled, helicopters
hovered, streets were blocked, and of-
ficers searched. But in the end,
authorities said it was just a chunk of
concrete which nicked Bush's armored
limousine.

"LAB TESTS indicate that there
were no steel fragments in the vice
president's car top and they are 99 per-
cent sure it was not a bullet," that hit
the vehicle as it wound through down-
town traffic in the morning rush hour,
said FBI spokesman Ron Dervish.
"We heard a loud bang and drove on
to work and that was it," Bush, said
later. "There really wasn't heightened
tension even. There wasn't anything
scary about it at all...Really, it's gotten
out of hand."

"I'm not used to all this attention."
Bush added.
Dervish said the V-shaped dent in the
Cadillac's roof may have been caused
by a rock kicked up by another vehicle
or possibly thrown by someone. The in-,
vestigation is continuing, Dervish said.
The conclusion came after about four
hours of intensive investigation along a
stretch of the downtown street where
the incident occurred.
Treasury Secretary Donald Regan,
who asked the Secret Service for a full

report on the incident, said, "There
have been a lot of falling objects in that
area." A major construction project is
under way there.
"Nobody was injured; everybody is
safe. The only harm was to the
limousine," Jack Warner of the Secret
Service said.
The incident occurred at about 7:20
a.m. said Warner. He said Bush's
motorcade speeded up but did not take
evasive action, proceeding to the White
House as planned.

Harassment reports called

exaggerated

By PERRY CLARK
University security officials yesterday vehemently
denied reports that they are receiving as many as 10
to 20 calls a night of incidents of sexual harassment
in campus dormitories.
The claim was made Monday night at an East
Quadrangle dormitory government meeting.
"IT'S NOT true," said Walter Stevens, director of
safety. "Maybe the calls go elsewhere, but they don't
come here. We've never had 10 calls in -one flay
dealing with that kind of situation," he said.

Dave Foulke, the manager of security services for
University housing, confirmed that the assertion
made by several East Quad residents was not ac-
curate. "I know absolutely that's false," Foulke said.
"It's (the 10 to 20 calls a night figure) not even in the
ball park. It's a rare night when we get 10 reports in a
24-hour period (concerning) everything."
FOULKE SAID a check of security records
revealed only 10 reports from East Quad in the last
five months relating to sexual harassment.
"Things are really quiet compared to three or four

years ago," Foulke said. "Not to make light of the
situation, but things are not all that bad."
Jay Frost, one of the East Quad Representative
Assembly members who made the claim a' the
meeting Monday night, said he heard the figure from
another student, Mary Garrison, who heard it from a
security guard. Garrison said she could not remem-
ber the guard's name.
But, Joel Allan, the supervisor of security services
for University housing, said, "I don't believe a
security officer made that kind of statement."

Dally Photo by JACKIE BELL
Gearing up
LSA junior Sue Constantinides scuba dives at Bell Poll for the second day of
her P.E.111class.
HAPPENINGS-
HIGHLIGHT
The Department of Theatre and Drama will present "Dial M for
Murder" this evening at 8 p.m. in the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
FILMS
Cinema II-Chinatown, 7 & 9:15 p.m., Lorch Hall.
PERFORMANCES
ARK-Hoot Night, open mike, 9 p.m., 1421 Hill.
School of Music-Percussion students recital, 8 p.m., Recital Hall.
EMU Players-"Night of the Iguana," 7p.m., Quirk Theatre.
SPEAKERS
Law School-Thomas Cooley, Elliot Richardson, "The Adaptation of
Structure to Function in International Organizations," 4 p.m., Hutchins
Hlall.
AfroamericanĀ° & Africari Studies-T. Alexander Alenikoff, "An Over-
view of the American Iitimigruton Laws," noon, 246 Lorch Hall.
School of Ed-DavidWeikart "Young Children Grow UP: Effects of
the Perry Preschool Program;" 4 p.m., Whitney Aud., School of Ed.
Music Theory Lecture Series-Robert Hatten, "Toward a Semiotic
Model of Style in Music," 8p.m., Rackham Assembly Hall.
Canterbury Loft-Bert Hornback, "Entertaining the Universe:
Relativity Demonstrated," 4 p.m., 332 S. State.
Ind. & Opers. Eng.-Tunde Onipiri, "The Development of a Simulator
for Manufacturing Methods Decisions," 4-5 p.m., 243W. Eng.
Chem. Engineering-James Wilkes, "The Amadahl 470/V8 Computer
and the Michigan Terminal System," 7:30-9:30 p.m., Vat. Sci. Aud.
Chemistry-Raymond Yoder, "Microwave Induces Plasma Emission
Detectorsfor Gas Chromatography," 4 p.m., 1200 Chem.
CEW & Committee for Gender Res.-Sean Campbell & Edna Coffin,
"Women's Worlds: The New Scholarship," noon-1:30 p.m., Rms. 4 & 5 Mich.
League; Counseling Group, "Onward and Upward," 7:309:30 p.m.
Biological Sciences-Philip Perlman, "Genes within Genes: Some in-
trons Doce for Proteins," 4 p.m., Lec. Rm. 1, MLB.
Computing Center-Forrest Hartman, "Intro. to Document Preparation
in MTS," 7-8:30 p.m., B1 MLB.
School of Ed.-Fred Goodman, "Gaming Simulation-Use in
Teaching,"7:30-9:30 p.m., Sch. of Ed.
MEETINGS
Eastern Orthodox Christian iellowship-7:30 p.m; Oxford Housing,
Vandenburg Coop, student lounge.
Science Fiction Club-"Stilyagi Air Corps." 8:15 p.m., ground floor conf.
rm., Union.
Clerical Advisory Committee to the Commission for Women-noon-1
p.m., Fleming Bldg.
MI Chapter, Robert Morris Associates-Past presidents meeting,
Sheraton UniversityInn.
Tau Beta Pi-Free tutoring 8-10 p.m., 307 UGLI & 2332 Bursley.
WCBN-"Radio Free Lawyer: Discussion of Legal Issues," 6 p.m., 88.3
FM.
Int. Ctr.-Presentation for first-time travellers to Europe, "Tailoring
Your European Trip to You," noon, Int. Ctr., Rec. Rm., 603 E. Madison St.
Folklore Society-Clog Dance Class & Practice, beginning class, 7:30-8
p.m.; Intermediate & Advanced Practice, 8-9:30 p.m., League Studio.
Meekreh-Dinner with Israeli political scientist, Mordechai Nissan, 5:30
p.m., Markley North Pit.
Hillel- "Our Lives: As Women & As Jews," series of panel discussions
involving women in the community, 8:30 p.m., 1429 Hill.
Ext. Services-125th Annual Mich. Fire Chiefs Training Conf., Weber's
Inn.
Artist & Craftsman Guild-Workshop, Eric Gay, "Making Slides for
your Portfolio,"7-9 p.m., Anderson Rm., Union.
SOAP-Student Wood & Craft Shop, Power tool safety class 6 p.m., 537
SAB.
Artworlds-New, independent Photography'Club, 7:30 p.m.; handspun
knitting intensive workshops, 7 p.m., 2131/2S. Main St.
UAC-Auditions for Pint-Size Productions Children's Theater "Wiley
and the Hairy Man," 7:30 p.m., 2105 Mich. Union.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of:
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI. 48109.

Study History & Public Policy
At GW in the' Nation's Capital

Committee questions fees

it

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Rent a Car from Econlo-Car

(Continued from Page 1)
course the student is taking."
Crafton cited statistics from a report
by LS&A administrative board
assistant Mary Maguire, in which of
1500 late drops, 750 were exclusively
from five departments : biology,
chemistry, computer. science,
economics, and math.
GEOGRAPHY Prof. Ann Larimore
called the new fee an "excise tax," and
math Prof. Peter Hinman called for a
resolution "in strong opposition" to the
policy.
Assistant LSA Dean for Student
Academic Affairs Eugene Nissen, who
is also a member of the curriculum
committee, requested discussion of the
new fee policy after several of his staff
expressed concern that it was poorly
defined.
In a memo to Ernest Zimmermann,
assistant to Vice President for
Academic Affairs Billy Frye, Nissen
outlined several areas that he said were

not addressed by the policy, including
the specific purpose of the new fee, and
exactly what the new revenue will be
used for.

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