100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 29, 1982 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-01-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Squaring off

The fight begins over 'New Federalism'

WASHINGTON - President Reagan and key
members of his administration continued their lob-
bying blitz yesterday for the President's New
Federalism program, while Democratic leaders
unleashed their attack upon his plan.
Both sides focused their efforts yesterday on win-
ning the backing of the nation's mayors, who were
gathered in Washington for the winter meeting of the
U.S Conference of Mayors:
REAGAN, MOVING quickly to counter criticism of
his. New Federalism program, met with three
Republican mayors yesterday and won their backing
for his contention that there would be neither winners
nor losers among the states.
* White House aid'es passed out charts purporting to
show that the shift of programs and funds between
the federal government and the states would be
balanced in every case. They emphasized that the
figures they used might well change, but that the
balance they illustrated would not.
"All states would be held harmless," said White
House spokesman David Gergen.
BUT, SPEAKING at the meeting of the Conference
of Mayors, Democratic House Speaker Thomas
"Tip" O'Neill called the program to transfer welfare,
food stamps, and about 40 other social programs "a
disguised attempt to balance the budget on the backs
of state and local governments."
But he said Congress responds to the will of the
people and if the people want it, Congress will pass it.
Housing and Urban Development Secretary
Samuel Pierce, and Energy Secretary James Ed-
Swards, however, also appeared before committee
sessions of the mayors to lobby in favor of Reagan's
programs -but had few details.
PIERCE SAID he is "very bullish" on the proposal
tp create enterprise zones for distressed areas. "It
will not be a panacea,'"-he sai'd, but it should bring in

PRESIDENT REAG'AN has squared off with
Democratic leaders, including House Speaker Tip
O'Neill, over the President's New Federalism
program. Reagan speaks before the American
Association of Independent Television Stations
(above) to rally support for his plan, while O'Neill
(right) blasted the program yesterday before the
nation's mayors.
funds without costing more than minimal ad-
ministrative costs.
Richard Schweiker, secretary of Health and
Human. Services and the cabinet member most affec-
ted by the proposal, urged the mayors to reserve
their judgment until they have a chance to help the
administration iron out their concerns.
6 The mayors themselves were divided over whether
Reagan's plan to transfer more responsibility from
Washington to their own local governments would
be beneficial.
MAYOR HELEN Boosalis of Lincoln, Neb.,
president of the U.S. Conference of Mayors, opened
the conference's two-day winter meeting by saying:
"It has never been clearer that the national policy
being pursued in this country today is one which calls

Witness links Williams toavictim

From AP and UPI
ATLANTA - A witness testified
yesterday that she saw one of the city's
young black slaying victims slumped
over with his eyes shut in a car driven
by Wayne Williams, and that the youth
failed to respond when she called his
name.
Nellie Trammell told jurors at
Williams' murder trial that she saw 21-
year-old Larry Rogers, a neighbor,
with the defendant i% a green station
wagon on March 30, 1981, the day
Rogers disappeared. He was found
dead 10 days later.
- "I SAID, 'LARRY?' He didn't say
anything,' she said. Her testimony
was the fourth time prosecution wit-
nesses have placed Williams with one of
the 28 young blacks whose deaths
during a 22-month period have been in-
vestigated by a police task force.
Trammell said the car Williams was
driving had cut in front of her car last
* March 30 and then turned around
slowly enough for her to try to talk to
Rogers. -

During cross-examination, Trammel
said she was not concerned about
seeing Rogers under those conditions
because, "I thought he was trying to
hide, he didn't want anyone to see him
because he was with a newsman."
WILLIAMS, a 23-year-old black free-
lance photographer and aspiring music
promoter is charged with murdering
Nathaniel Cater, 27 and Jimmy Ray
Payne, two of those blacks on the task
force list.
No arrests have been made in the 26.
other deaths, but prosecutors claim
they can link Williams to 10 other
slaying victims - including Rogers and
eight others on the task force list. The
judge has allowed testimony on the
other 10 victims for the limited pur-
pose of showing a pattern that might fit
the Cater and Payne slayings.
Williams has denied knowing any of
the 28 victims, but prosecutors have
presented seven witnesses who said
they saw him with Rogers and three
other victims.

TRAMMELL testified she recognized
Williams as a "newsman" she had seen
carrying a camera March 20 at the
Techwood Homes housing project,
where residents set up security patrols
because of the killings. He was driving
a white station wagon that day, she
said.
Attorney Jim Kitchens, a Mississippi
lawyer who just joined the defense
team, asked Trammell if she had ever
identified Williams' photograph in a
police file. She responded that she had,
last April.
Kitchens then pointed out that
Williams did not become a suspect in
the, case until last May 22.
"Cool Breeze" - Tilbert Baynham, a
former heroin addict - told a ram-
bling, disjointed story of seeing Itogers
with Williams three times in one day on
March 27. But he also admitted he was
high on marijuana he smoked with his
coffee before coming to the courthouse.

Milk

Jobs ma be *,-ll9130 E
in M A PLE VI It AQ E S H PG CTR BARGAIN SHOWS $2.50 Before 6 Pm Mon-Fri Before 3 PM Sat.Sun
THE REAL TRICK IS 3:051
getting tight VICNTHTREE
STAYING ALIVE 1:00
1::30-3:20-5:15R:00
Y rv e I>> . a "Thu.dS7:.15 3032-15 -

ti uesouc l u
(Continued from Page 2).
shifting its focus to research, and the
department is urging more students to
obtain a master's degree.
Natural resources Prof. Stewart
Marquis suggested that to combat
decreasing job opportunities, students
become "more flexible" in professional
abilities and goals. According to
Marquis, chairman of resource policy
and management, students with talent
and ambition will succeed. . ,

-7----1-

m!m

fWalt Disney's 1:30R
3:4 RtCf ARO
5 1
7 00 P~a
845 ,.J

:oI

-A

* Fine Chinese Food *
ORIENT
EXPRESS
324 S. State
at E. William, Ann Arbor
Daily Menu includes:
EGG ROLLS.............1.20
ALMOND CHICKEN .........3.35
TERIYAKI BEEF .............1.65
EGG FOO YUNG.........2.89
TEMPURA PORK ............:1.30
SHRIMP FRIED RICE.........2.45
TERIYAKI CHICKEN ........2.69
And many other favorites

-r

20% Off Any Purchase
With This Ad*
expires 2/7/82

Open 7 Days a week
Fast carry-out and
sit-down service
Call: 668-1332 i i i
State St.
* GOOD AFTER 2 P.M.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan