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January 29, 1982 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-01-29

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ARTS_
Friday, January 29, 1982

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Page 6

The Michigan Daily

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764-0558

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Record,
Larry Carlton-Sleepwalk
(Warner Brothers)
l{ ew people know Larry Carlton by
name, but his guitar licks have flavore
works by such diverse artists as Steely
Dan, Joni Mitchell, the Crusaders, an
most recently Mike Post. He is one o
$ the most popular session guitarists on
the West Coast, and in recent years has
tried to capitalize on that popularity by
venturing out on his own. Carlton ha:
followed two moderately successfu
solo efforts with the recently release
Sleepwalk, his finest solo effort.
On Sleepwalk, Carlton demonstrate
his affinity for the California melody
reminiscent of the R&B of the Doobi
Brothers. In fact, the album's second
track, "Blues Bird" (sky blue at best)
features the same recycled keyboard
line that Michael McDonald wrote int
the Doobies' "Real Love."
Carlton's effort in Sleepwalk seems to
emulate Steely Dan's Gaucho mold
The calculated restraint is recognizable
(and disconcerting) in virtually ever:
song. This production concept i
evident right down to the album'
jacket photos where each musician sit
with a chart and headphones in a lonely
Southern California recording booth.

C '__ ___________ ____________________________________

SATURDAY, FEB. 6 AT 8:30
HILL AUDITORIUM
Tickets at $9.00, $8.00, $7.00, $5.00
Tickets at Burton Tower, Ann Arbor, MI 48109
Weekdays 9-4:30, Sat. 9-12(313)665-3717
Tickets also available at Hill Auditorium
1 hours before performance time.
YIJVJVEkSITYCfIUSIGAL COCIETY
In Its 103rd Year
2 _____________________________

Is
there
life
,after
C r.
Cancer?-
Some people think.
that even when a cancer is
cured, the patient will
never live a normal life
again.
The American Cancer
Society knows better
It helps people return to
their homes and their jobs.
There is life after cancer.
mo million people are
living proof. If you or
anyone close to you needs
help, call us.
American
Cancer.
Society
This space contributed as a
public service

This lack of spontaneity translates into
C a very enjoyable sound, even though
void of Carlton's potent guitar. In terms
of achieving the goal of a Gaucho
Y sound, Carlton has succeeded quite
d well, although he clearly lets his in-
Y terest in keyboards stand in the way of
d a potentially cleaner sound.
f The completely instrumental
n album is loaded with LA-like uptempo
s ballads. These ballads often break
Y through the realm of the average into
s first-rate pop-fusion.
l Of particular interest is "Song For
d Katie," an overdubbed guir duet in
which, as in every really enjoyable
s Carlton arrangement, the keyboards
Y have been subordinated to Carlton's
e formidable fret skills.
d The album's title track is another
, keeper; a fifties-style love ballad
d replete with strings and a soulful guitar
U melody. "Upper Kern" (your guess is
as good as mine) features David Son-
o born's patented Warner Brothers sax,
. although Sanborn and Carlton have a
e tough time cutting through the heavy
Y strings and keys. "10:00 P.M." is a rare
s example of shuffle-blues meets the
s West Coast. The result is interesting
s and listenable. Unfortunately, the
Y album closes at -its nadir with "You
L.' Gotta Get It While You Can,"a Latin-
flavored wrecker with a frightening
Brian Mann Mini-Moog solo.
Carlton has shown real growth in his
three albums. He has gone from a sap-
py singing Fender Rhodes-laden pop-
ster to a mature producer-composer-
performer who seems just one album
away from success. If he can combine
his style and flair for composition while
minimizing some of his arrangements,
Larry Carlton could become an influen-
tial force.
-James Harris
U2- October' (Island)
The advocators of adolescent angst
have."matured" lyrically into nothing
more than regurgitors of tired
cliches. While Boy was painfully
disorienting (due, in part, to the
promimity of the themes), October is
almost anesthetizing in its attempt to
grope with the desolute desperation of
young adulthood. If not for Bono's vocal
ability to fill the lyrics with sincere
despondency, they would seem absurd.
U2's saving grace is their music; the
tension created by the clashing-of
Bono's vocals and the Edge's haunting,,
terse guitar lines, along with the piano
and acoustic guitar accompaniments
added to emphasize the pensive at-
mosphere of the album. The anxiety
climaxes on side one with "Fire" and
"Rejoice"; side two revels in a more
sedate reflectiveness. Although the ten-
sion is often alienating, its dolefulness
allows accessibility; much more so
than either the Teardrop Explodes or
Echo and the~unnymen.
A mediocre album does not
necessarily, preclude future success,
and we can only hope that U2 develops
innovative lyrics to parallel their
unique sound.
Michael Huget

Clubs/Bars

Joe's Star Lounge (109 N. Main)
The Urbations are featured
tonight and tomorrow. Early rock
'n' roll and fun R&B.
Mr. Flood's Party (120 W. Liberty,;
995-2132)
The Blue Front Persuaders, noted
for their scalding R&B classics and
originals, perform - tonight and
tomorrow.-

Rick's American Cafe (611 Church;
996-2747)
The, Jimmy/ Johnson Band,
featuring Jimmy Johnson, a highly-
respected, humorous bluesman from
Chicago, perform tonight and
tomorrow. Strongly recommended.
Second Chance (516 E. Liberty;
994-5350)
Oldiesrock 'n' roll with Steve
King and the Dittilies through
tomorrow.
U-Club (Michigan Union 530 S
State; 763-5911)
Jazz-flavored reggae with Onyxz.
Concerts
The Ark (1421 Hill; 761-4510)
Tonight and tomorrow the Ark
features Andy Bteckman, Ann Ar-
bor's favorite comic singer. On Sun-
day, Sally Rogers sings traditional
songs of places you never knew had
songs about them.
Eclipse Jazz
Oscar Peterson's fluidity and
power on the piano has placed him
on a plateau that most pianists

The great jazz pianist Oscar Peterson will perform at Hill
Auditorium on Saturday.

t,

dream of attaining someday. It is
hard to find a person who can
honestly say the Peterson is not one
of the greatest living jazz pianists.
He performs Sunday night at Hill
Auditorium. Call 763-6922 for more.
information.
University of Michigan Guest Piano
Recital
Premiere of Argentinian composer
Alberto Ginastera's Piano Sonata
No. 2, performed by Anthony di
Bonaventure. Originally scheduled
to premiere last October, the event
was postponed because Ginastera
had not yet completed the piece: 8.
p.m. at Rackham Auditorium. Ad-
mission isfree.
Exhibits
Alice Simsar Gallery (301 N. Main;
665-4883)
"Arcanum I-XIII," a collection of
thirteen prints by Robert Rauschen-
berg, continues through February
17th. The pieces feature the artist's
modernist use of various media, in-
cluding silkscreen, silk collage,
water collar and stitching
Theater
Canterbury Loft (332 South State;
665-0606)
The Loft presents Ellen Linnell
Prosserfs She Brought Me Violets, a
play dealing with a woman who
must come to terms with the sudden
death of her daughter. The play runs'
through the weekend.
Ann Arbor Civic Theater (338 S.
Main; 662-7282)
Main Street Productions presents
Edward Albee's first play, Zoo
Story, a one-act absurdist drama'
about the struggle between two.men
for territorial rights to a bench in
Central Park. Runs through the
weekend.

eezzlipse'
presents
WINTER '82

OD SEATS AVAILABLEI
4TOMORROW

OSCAR
PE TEESON
P ,T1*solo piano
Saturday, January 30
Hill Auditorium -8 P.M.
Tickets: $9.50, 8.50, 7.50
reserved, on sale now

l50
I INDIVIDUAL THEATRES
5th Ave. at liberty 761-9700
7 GOLDEN GLOBE
NOMINATIONS

WED SAT SUN
$1.50 Til 6:00 pm (Except "REDS")

RICHARD DREYFUSS
JOHN CASSAVETES
Whose life is
it anyway.?
'The miracle- of this movie is that It
sends us home in a state bordering on
elation. "-Cosmopolitan Mag

1mm_...

Thursday, February 18
Power Center -8 P.M.
Tickets: $8 50 reserved,
on sale now

4

REDS

WARREN
BEATTY
0
DIANE
KEATON-

A, A .

sa'yn-'+y, q 7
,a

james
BLOOD
ulmner
Friday, March 12
Union Ballroom- 8 P.M.
Tickets:-$6.50 General Admission

MON., FRI.-7:00, 9:15
SAT, SUN-2:10, 4:35, 7:00,

MON., FRI.-8:30
SAT, SUN-1:00, 4:45, 8:30 (PG)
SAT, SUN-$2,50 Til 1:30 pm

(R)
9:15

0

1$2 ANN ARBOR LATE SHOWS
FRI-SAT NIGHT-ALL SEATS $2.00

TICKETS ON 1
SALE TUESDAY

"The most original guitarist since Jinni
Hendrix"-Robert Palmer,
Rolling Stone
WOODY SHAW

At Midnight (X)
She was willing
to do anything to win.
Anything!j
RATED X

At 11:30PM (R) -
The King of Karate
Bruce Lee

6

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