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January 07, 1982 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-01-07

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with
CHICAGO PETE
and
GIP ROBERTS
and the Detroiters
Hosted by the Famous Coachman
THIS FRIDAY
January 6, 8 PM-$2 Cover
UNIVERSITY CLUB-
Michigan Union
IT'S HERE FOR YOU

Page 2-Thursday, January 7, 1982-The Michigan Daily
Reagan pushes order
to restrict release of
security information

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WASHINGTON (AP) - The Reagan
administration will begin briefing
Congress today on a proposed p-
residential order that would let gover-
nment officials invoke national security
more easily and more often in keeping
information from the public.
Stephen Garfinkel, director of the In-
formation Security Oversight Office,
said he will present the proposal to the
Senate Judiciary Committee and the
House Intelligence Committee at closed
briefings.
"I THINK THEY will have
suggestions that we will seriously con-
sider," Garfinkel said. He added that
the current timetable calls for
President Reagan to sign the order next
month. Congressional approval is not
required.
An initial draft of the order, obtained
by The Associated Press in October,
would reverse a 25-year-old trend
toward restricting the power of gover-
nment officials to shelter information
from public view.
Reagan could simply sign the order,
giving it the force of law. But as in an
earlier executive order governing U.S.
intelligence agencies, the ad-
ministration is willing to negotiate the

final terms with congressional over-
sight committees.
The administration's draft intelligen-
ce order drew criticism on Capitol Hill
for seeking to remove many of the
restrictions imposed on the CIA in the
1970s. The final order, signed Dec. 4,
broadened the CIA's powers but not
nearly so muich as in the earlier draft.
THE DRAFT of the secrecy order
would scrap President Carter's 1978 rule
that government secrecy be balanced
against the public's, right to know. It
would make national security the sole
basis for deciding whether to apply the
secrecy stamp.
Critics contend the proposal also
would effectively exempt the CIA from
the Freedom of Information Act by
mandating withholding of "information
relating to intelligence sources and
methods.'
"THE DANGER is that we will not be
able to get information about CIA
wrongdoing" because the agency could
claim that nearly all its activities relate
to its sources and methods, said Morton
Halperin, director of the Center for
National Security Studies and a former
National Security Council staff member.

MIDNITE 8pm to Midnite
MAD'NSS Jan.8th th
Fr day

Polish students organizing
resistance to martial law

~aiteKns gone
v !41A Dbil

Saturday

(Continued from Page 1)
looking for people violating the cur-
few."
Polish Foreign Trade Minister
Tadeusz Nestorowicz flew to Moscow
and signed an agreement designed to
rebuild the Polish economy with
deliveries of Soviet fuel, raw materials
and machinery, the Soviet news agency
Tass reported.
Radio Warsaw said the pact called
for "deliveries of goods of fundamental
significance for the Polish economy
which greatly exceed our exports." To
cover the shortfall, the radio said, the
Soviet Union granted "long term finan-
cial credits on convenient terms
amounting to 2.7 billion rubles" - the
equivalent of $3.86 billion at the official
exchange rate.
POLISH OFFICIALS denounced.
President Reagan's sanctions yester-
day as inhumane and said Poland, in
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desperate need of grain, would have to
triple domestic production to meet
minimum food requirements.
Reports reaching the West said
Polish authorities also have accused
farmers of hoarding grain and other
food supplies.
News of the trade agreement stirred
hopes that Poland would be able to
repay some of its debts to Western
banks soon. Before the broadcast, Lon-
don banking sources said there was no
sign that Poland has paid even part of
the $500 million interest due by Dec. 31
on the $2.4 billion in loans supposed to
be repaid in 1981.
THE SOURCES said a small group of
banking representatives is to meet in
London today to discuss the debt.
Poland owes about $16 billion to the
banks and another $10 billion to
Western governments.
Despite deteriorating relations with
the Soviet Union oyer its role ,in Poland,.
the United States plans to intensify
communicatons with the Kremlin,
possibly through a summit meeting
Secretary of State Alexander Haig said
yesterday.
Without making specific commit-
ments, Haig made clear this applies to
his own scheduled meeting with Soviet
Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko and
perhaps a conference this year between
President Reagan and Soviet President
Leonid Brezhnev.
A direct exchange between the
superpower leaders, Haig said, "is
more, rather than less, important in
times of crisis."

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press international reports
Schlachter to plead guilty
to training Libyan terrorists
WASHINGTON- Douglas Schlachter, accused of helping two ex-CIA em-
ployees train terrorists in Libya, has agreed to plead guilty to two violations
of federal law and then help prosecutors investigate the case, a prosecutor
said yesterday.
Schlachter, named in an indictment as project supervisor for the terrorist
training project, will plead guilty to one conspiracy count and one count of
violating a law regulating exports of defense materials, Assistant U.S. At-
torney Lawrence Barcella told a federal judge.
Schlachter was indicted, along with former CIA employees Edwin Wilson
and Francis Terpil, and accused of violating federal laws by shipping ex-
plosives to Libya and using them in the training project.
Students in Sudan protest
austere economic measures
KHARTOUM, Sudan- Police fired warning shots in the air and threw
teargas at thousands of students marching yesterday to protest President
Gaafar Nimeiri's austere economic measures.
There were no reports of injuries during the march through the center of
the city in a third day of protests.
U.S. Embassy sources said visiting Sen. Charles Percy (R-Ill.), who heads
the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, met with Sudanese officials and
Western diplomats as scheduled, despite the unrest. The senator arrived in
this African nation early yesterday after visits to Israel, Jordan and neigh-
boring Egypt.
The students chanted protests against the United States, the Nimeiri
government and the Washington-based International Monetary Fund.
Spanish king denounces
allegations by military
MADRID- King Juan Carlos yesterday denounced as "slander"
allegations by members of the military that he supported last year's attempt
by right-wing elements to overthrow Spain's democratic government.
His unprecedented speech revealed new signs of conflict between the
military and the civilian government.
The 44-year-old monarch said he was fully aware of leaflets being cir-
culated within the armed forces insinuating he was involved in last
February's attempt by right-wing military men to overthrow the civilian
government.
PSC plans public hearings
on phone deregulation
LANSING- The Public Service Commission yesterday announced an un-
precedented series of statewide public hearings to bring attention to a bill in
Congress that the PSC believes could triple basic telephone rates.
PSC Chairman Eric Schneidewind said such increases could "literally
destroy" the state's current telephone system.
The hearing will take place between Jan. 11 and Jan. 28.
Pierce not being pressured
to drop out of governor's race
LANSING- Sen. Edward Pierce, a Democratic candidate for governor
and outspoken backer of state-funded abortions for door women, said
yesterday he has not received any direct pressure from his party to drop out
of the race. _..
The physician-lawmaker from Ann Arbor, in a news conference centering
on the abortion issue, said if elected he would continue Republican Gov.
Williar Milliken's practice of vetoing legislative attempts to cut state fun-
ding for Medicaid abortions.
Vol. XCII, No. 79
Thursday, January 7, 1982
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The Univer-
sity of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during
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PUBLICATION SCHEDULE
1981
SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER
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