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November 18, 1980 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-11-18

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-_._ r

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, November 18, 1980-Page 5

Southwestern areas
struck hard by snow

From The Associated Press
A storm that left the towns and oil
cities of West Texas and Oklahoma
mired in snow a foot deep sped east-
ward to the Appalachians yesterday, a
weatherman's surprise that paralyzed
traffic, closed schools, and shut off
power to thousands.
The buildup of upjo 17 inches was the
heaviest November snowfall on record
in places and the deepest at any time of
year during the last decade in other
areas.
AT LEAST three traffic deaths were
blamed on the storm, including two
people who were killed when a church
bus flipped over on a rain-slick highway
near Duling, Texas, on Sunday, - in-
juring 36 others.
"We got bunch of ice, and a bunch of
snow on top of that," said a spokesman

W
for the Texas Department of Public
Safety in Lubbock, where 11 inches had
accumulated by yesterday morning.
"It all adds up to one big problem. It's
slick and hazardous any way you want
to go out of Lubbock."
By midday, the storm system had
reached Appalachia, spreading the first
snow of the season I to 4 inches deep in
an area from West Virginia's Northern
Panhandle to the Laurel Mountains of
Pennsylvnia.
GET PURL SHED9
SUBMIT PAPERS TO
Michigan Journal of
Economics by Dec. 1
BOX IN LOBBY OF
ECONOMICS BUILDING

K

1

e AP Photo
Carried away
An unidentified woman protesting the arms race and violence against women was carried away by police yesterday for
blocking the entrance to the Pentagon. About 1300 women participated in the demonstration in which 188 people were
arrested. The demonstration was planned by the women from the New England Conference on Women and Life On
Earth, according to spokeswoman Ynestra King. She said about 30 womens' groups, primarily from the Northeastern
states, joined the protest.

Units

under investigation

meet minority liring goals

By MAURA CARRY
Affirmative action goals for hiring faculty members have
been met in the seven University academic units targeted for
investigation by the federal government, the University's
director of affirmative action said yesterday.
These academic units, and three non-academic units, also
seem to-be complying with affirmative action goals for staff
positions, Affirmative Action Director Virginia Nordby
reported at the Senate Assembly meeting.
NORDBY TOLD faculty members that it is the respon-
sibility of the University's deans and administrators to carry
out affirmative action plans because they do the actual hiring
of staff members. "Our job in the affirmative action office is
to educate these people as to what's expected for them by af-
firmative action standards, and try to develop some
procedures for working toward equality," she said. Affir-
mative action standards are set by the U.S. Department of
Labor.
Currently, each University unit is responsible for deter-
mining who can be recruited for any position that opens up in
that unit, and identifying an "availability pool" from which a
choice can be made, Nordby said.
"I'm committed to making affirmative action work in our
decentralized structure," she said. The affirmative action
director added that other state institutions have centralized
plans for implementation of affirmative action goals, but the}
University has the ability to achieve those goals through its
individual units.
ONE FACULTY member at the meeting asked Nordby if it
was possible a University department, while trying to live up
to affirmative action goals, might sacrifice quality by hiring

a female or minority staff member rather than the person
who is the most qualified for the job.
Nordby replied that affirmative action is a process that
helps women and minorities become more competitive in the
labor market. It cannot be interpreted as a quota system, she
added. The most important consideration, she said, is to
make certain the candidates in the hiring pool have an equal
chance.
"A sincere, good faith effort should be made to seek out the
best qualified women and minorities to hire, and then select
the best qualified applicant," Nordby said. She emphasized
that the most qualified person should always be hired, but if
there are two equally qualified applicants for a position and
one is a woman or minority group member, the woman or
minority group member should be hired in order to comply
with affirmative action goals.
NORDBY SAID President Harold Shapiro said during his
state of the University address that the University has shown
"modest growth" in attaining affirmative action goals. From
1973 to 1980, the percentage of female faculty members rose
from 13 to 16 percent, and the percentage of minority faculty
members rose from six to seven percent, she said.
Nordby added that under the current hiring freeze, it will
be difficult for the University to attain its goal of hiring 130
more female and 73 more minority faculty and staff mem-
bers. But despite the freeze, some job positions will open up,
and she said, University departments will have to pay atten-
tion to affirmative action goals in the few instances that they
will be able to hire.
"I'm not at all discouraged," Nordby said. "There's much
we can still do even in these difficult times."

r

rp 14

r Mass. Gov.

FREE HEATED DELIVERY
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We reserve the right to limit our delivery area

seeks

funds

for Boston's
transit system
BOSTON (AP) - Rebuffed in a last-
minute appeal for cash from normal
channels, Massachusetts Gov. Edward
King asked a special legislative session
yesterday for a quick reorganization of
Boston's mass transit system and $41
million to keep 250,000 riders from
being stranded in the cold.
"I am determined that the system not
stop if there is anything at all I can do,"
King told reporters at a news conferen-
ce called to outline his plan for a state
'bailout of the Massachusetts Bay Tran-
sportation Authority.'
"A shutdown would impose undue
hardships unnecessarily on hundreds of
thousands of people," he said earlier in
his message to the legislature.

SOCIOLOGY
Department of Sociology
Meeting For Concentrators
and Future Concentrators,
Henderson Room, Michigan League

OPEN 7 DAYS
4:30p.m.-2a.m.
Sun. 4p.m.-a.m.

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