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November 13, 1980 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1980-11-13

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Page 2-Thursday, November 13, 190-The Michigan Daily
Reagan urged to cut affirmative
action, other civil rights policies

WASHINGTON (AP) - A conservative group, in
advice to the Reagan transition team, says the
Justice Department's civil rights division has
become radicalized and urges sweeping policy
changes, including an end to affirmative action.
A task force of the Heritage Foundation, a conser-
vative Washington-based "think tank," proposes that
Reagan repeal executive orders issued by Presidents
Lyndon Johnson, Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter.
THE EXECUTIVE orders involved require that
federal agencies and government contractors take
affirmative steps to increase the hiring and
promotion of blacks, women, the handicapped, and
minorities who have been victims of past
discrimination.
Terming the civil rights division the "most
radicalized" element of the Justice Department, the

group proposes policy reversals and orders to stop
the federal governmenit from advocating cross-
district busing for integration, from supporting civil
suits designed to boost minority and female
professional school enrollments and from even
collecting job data by race, sex or ethnic origin.
Heritage Vice President Phil Truluck said a collec-
tion of transition suggestion reports, totaling 3,000
pages, will be turned over today to Edwin Meese,
head of Reagan's transition team. The project, was
begun a year ago on Heritage's own initiative.
MEESE, WHO HAS worked with Heritage officials
for several years, was told about the project last
spring. At a news conference here yesterday, Meese
noted that the project has no official status in the
Reagan transition but he added that the transition
planners were very interested in getting the Heritage

papers and "we are very pleased with the recom-
mendations that have been presented to us" so far.
During the campaign, Reagan said he opposed
school busing for integration and numerical quotas
for minorities, although he added that he might pick a
female or minority candidate from a group of equally
qualified candidates for certain jobs.
The Heritage group warns Reagan that civil rights
changes will be controver'sial. The group says the
new assistant attorney general in charge of the civil
rights division must be "willing to take the heat for
policy reversals" and "must understand from the
beginning that he may be forced to resign in order to
insulate the presidency."
GIVEN THIS understanding, the Heritage planners
say, the president should refuse to interfere in the
new civil rights chief's conduct of litigation.

Exiled Soviet dissident killed

MADRID, - Spain (AP)-Andrei
Amalrik, a leading exiled Soviet
dissident, was killed in a head-on
collision with a truck as he drove from
southern France to Madrid to speak out
against the Soviet Union at an inter-
national conference, police said yester-
day.
Rumors and suggestions that the ac-
cident Tuesday night could have been
UNISEX f
Long or Short Haircuts
by Professionals at ...
DASCOLA STYLISTS
Liberty off State .........66.9329
East U.atSouth U...... 662-0354
Arborland .............. 971.9975
Maple Village .......... 761-2733

"provoked" were dismissed by Spanish
police and Allen Weinstein, head of an
American citizens committee attending
the conference. They noted the accident
occurred on a slippery road in a heavy
storm.
The 42-year-old author, playwright,
and historian, whose commitment to
individual rights and clashes with of-
ficial Soviet dogma cost him years in
Siberian prison camps before he was
exiled in 1976, probably will be
cremated and buried in Spain, a family
friend said.'
ACCORDING TO authorities,
Amalrik, accompanied by his wife and
two other Soviet dissidents, was driving
to attend the 35-nation Madrid con-
ference reviewing the Helsinki accords
on human rights and detente.
Amalrik, long critical of the
Kremlin's treatment of political

prisoners and individual liberties, ap-
parently hoped to testify on Soviet non-
compliance with the agreements. Sour-
ces said he had been given a special
pass for the conference.
About 40 miles north of the Spanish
capital, the car, with Amalrik at the
wheel, spun on the wet highway, slid
over to the left side of the road, and
crashed head-on into a heavy truck
going in the opposite direction, police
said.
THEY SAID the impact of the crash
drove the car's steering post into
Amalrik's neck and that he died as he
was being taken to a hospital close to
the accident site. Initial reports had
said a piece of metal from the truck
pierced Amalrik's neck.
Mrs. Amalrik and the other car oc-
cupants, identified as Viktor Fainberg
and Vladimir Borissov, were not in-
jured,nor was the Spanish truck driver
who said he did his best to avoid the
crash.
A family friend said the burial plan
was the wish of Amalrik's wife Gyuzel,
an artist, who also requested a simple
funeral service here.
AMALRIK, educated as a historian,
and who spoke in Ann Arbor in 1977,
was expelled from Moscow University
for writing a thesis on the influence of
Scandinavian kings on the early
Russian nation. The theory is supported
by some Scandinavian and German
historians, but hotly denied by Russian
scholars.

Amalrik
... 1977 University speaker

U

POETRY READING
with
HOWARD McCORD
(Bowling Green)
& RICHARD McMULLEN
Reading from their works
Thurs., Nov. 13-7:30 P.M.
Workshop with poets
at 6:30 P.M.
ADMISSION: FREE
REFRESHMENTS

NOON LUNCHEON
Homemade Soup & Sandwich 75Q
Friday, Nov. 14
PROF. JIM CROWFOOT,
Nat. Resources:
"Concerns about the call for a
highersquality University."
GUILD HOUSE
802 MONROE
(662-5189)

His first clash with Soviet officials
came in 1965 when authorities seized six
plays which they characterized as anti-
Soviet and pornographic. Amalrik was
sent to Siberia for a year before the
charges were dropped.
Amalrik used the experience as the
basis of a book, "Involuntary Journey
to Siberia,:" which led to a three-year
term in Siberia beginning in 1970.
PERHAPS HE is most famous for
another book, "Will the Soviet Union
Survive Until 1984?" which predicted a
war between Moscow and Peking that
would lead to a collapse of the Soviet
regime.

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Congress fixes tax cut
WASHINGTON-The outgoing Democratic-controlled 96th Congress, em-
barking on a final "lame-duck" session, junked plans yesterday for con-
sideration of a tax cut backed by President-elect Ronald Reagan.
Senate Democrats voted overwhelmingly against even bringing the tax
cut bill to the floor-a measure House Speaker Thomas O'Neill announced
President Carter was prepared to veto if it reached his desk.
Leaders promised that the session-the first post-election meeting of
Congress in a presidential election year in 32 years-would be brief, with a
shortened agenda. Later in the day, O'Neill and Senate Majority Leader
Robert Byrd met and agreed to recess the lame duck session no later than
Dec. 5.
High court hears arguments
on televised trials
WASHINGTON-Florida's pioneering practice of allowing television
cameras in courtrooms came under attack in arguments before the nation's
highest tribunal yesterday.
Lawyer Joel Hirschhorn, representing two Miami policemen convicted of
burglary, told the Supreme Court permitting televised coverage deprives
defendants of a fair trial.
Florida Attorney General Jim Smith defended the state's practice,
saying: "It's better for the citizens to see an actual image ... rather than
depending on the interpretation of the commentators."
Mayors to draft city plan
for Reagan administration
Leading mayors, edgy about what the conservative tide in Congress and
the White House may mean to urban programs, are meeting today to draft
an "urban agenda" to be presented to the Reagan administration.
Overall, city spokesmen and urban ecoromists are guessing that a Reagan
administration may not produce too radical an urban policy shift from the
Carter years..
Both President Carter and President-elect Reagan favor heavy private-
sector involvement in rebuildingcities.
"What we are likely to see under Reagan is a substantial acceleration of
trends already begun under Carter," said Thomas Muller, an economist
with The Urban Institute, a Washington-based research organization.
Treatment may alleviate pain
of sickle cell, doctors say.
BOSTON-The agonizing pain that is one of sickle cell anemia's worst side
effects may be prevented by a new form of treatment that slightly changes
the chemical makeup of the victims' blood, doctors have found.
The treatment is not a cure for sickle cell anemia, but the researchers say
it appears to be a relatively simple way to free victims of their most painful
symptoms.
Doctors developed the nbw method, which usesrmedicine and diet to lower
sodium levels in the victims' blood, at two Harvard University-affiliated
hospitals in Boston. Their research was published in today's issue of the New
England Journal of Medicine.
Sickle cell anemia affects between 30,000 and 60,000 Americans, and vir-
tually all the victims are black.
Voyager flies closest ever
to Saturn, explores moons
PASADENA, Calif.-Voyager 1 sailed beneath the shimmering rings of
Saturn and explored a half-dozen icy moons as it climaxed a 38-month jour-
ney yesterday by taking the best-ever look at the planet's hazy, churning
surface.
The robot spaceship, 947 million miles from home and reaching speeds of
more than 50,000 mph, followed an exploratory route that passed 77,000.miles
from Saturn's golden clouds.
After covering 1.24 billion miles in a circuituous route to Saturn, Voyager
came within about 12 miles of the predetermined bull's-eye near Titan, said
mission spokesman Al Hibbs.
Gunmen kill Italian
executive in subway
MILAN, Italy-As passengers watched in horror, two gunmen
assassinated a business executive yesterday by shooting him in the head
from a seat behind him on a crowded Milan subway train.
Two men, described as in their 20s, fired two bullets into Renato Briano,
42-year-old chief of personnel of Ercole Marelli, a leading Italian manufac-
turer of electric equipment.

Shortly after the attack, a woman called a Milan radio station, claiming
the murder was the work of the Red Brigades.
Italy's most feared terrorist group, which kidnapped and killed former
Premier Aldo Moro in 1978, had been believed almost dissolved after a series
of major police crackdowns triggered by disclosures of former guerrillas
who turned informers.
hibe 3t an1┬žiI
Volume XCI, No. 61
Thursday, November 13, 1980
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109.
Subscription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); 13 by mail.
outside Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday
mornings. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7 by mail outside Ann
Arbor. Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to United Press International,
Pacific News Service. Los Angeles Times Syndicate and Field Newspapers Syndicate.
News room: (313) 764g0552, 76-DAILY; Sports desk: 764-0562; Circulation: 764 0558; Classified advertising:
764.0557: Display advertising: 764-0554; Billing: 764-0550; Composing room: 764-0556

1
"We have a full line of
footwear and winter clothing''
WINTER INFLATI0N USTERSI
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Wool Navy HERMAN
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SPECIAL $4998 $3198
Reg. $59.98
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BELL BOTTOMS Reg. $19.98
201 E. Washington at Fourth-994-3572
VI OPEN MON. THRU SAT. 9-6
SALE IN EFFECT THRU SATURDAY, 11-15-80

Human Rights at the University:
FOCUS ON GAY ISSUES
AND LIFESTYLES
FORMERLY CALLED "DORM RAPS"
CENTRAL AREA
Thursday, NOV. 13 1980-7-10pm, Law Club Lounge
THE UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY IS INVITED TO ATTEND
This event is sponsored by: The Human Sexuality Office ("Gay/Lesbian
Advocates"), Counseling Services, University of Michigan.
For.More Information, Call 763-4186 or 763-4187
BURRITOS and TACOS at
BICeYCLE
RES TA URATV
Come in and build your own from our
MEXICAN MAXIMUM BUFFET
HAPPY HOURS
Mon.-Thurs.Spin-close

.i

Hamburger $1.75
French Fries 254
Peanuts 104
Great discounts on beer
and liquor

BUSINESS HOURS
Mon.-Thurs. 11:30am-midnight
Fri.-Sat. 11:3am-1:OOam
Sun. 4:O0pm-9:00pm

1301 S. University, corner of Forest

GRAUATINGENGINEERS
AND SCIENTISTS
Have you considered these factors in determining where you will work?

4

1. Will the job offer challenge and
responsibility?
2. Will your future employer en-
courage job mobility?
3. Will your future employer en-
courage, support and reward
continued professional educa-
tion?
4 How much choice will you have

in selecting your work assign-
ment?
5. Big starting salaries are nice -
but what is the salary growth
and promotion potential in the
job?
6. Can you afford the cost-of-
living in the area?

have given these'things a lot of
consideration and believe we
have the answers for you.
Arrange through your placement
office to interview with our repre-
sentative(s) on

4

Editor-i-Chief............ ....MARK PARRENT
Managing Editor.,....... .......... MITCH CANTOR
City Editor ................ . PATRICIA HAGEN
University Editors ................. TOMAS MIRGA
BETH ROSENBERG
Features Editor............... ADRIENNE LYONS
Opinion Page Editors............JOSHUA PECK
HOWARD WITT
Arts Editors. . . . ...................MARK COLEMAN
DENNIS HARVEY
Sports Editor.......................ALAN FANGER
NEWS STAFF WRITERS: Arlyn Afremow Beth Allen
Sara Anspach. Lornza CrBenet. Nancy Bilyeau Doug
Brice, Julie Brown. Maura Carry. Claudia Centomini,

Business Manager..........ROSEMARY WICKOWSKI
Sales Manger.... ..... KRISTINA PETERSON
Operations Manager... KATHLEEN CULVER
Co-Display Manager ..DONNA DREBIN
Ca-Display Manager . ROBERT THOMPSON
Classified Manager. -......... SUSAN KLING
Finance Manager.. .... GREGG HADDAD
Nationals Manager . . LISA JORDAN
Circulation Manager .. ..TERRY DEAN REDOING
Sales Coordinator........... ;E ANDREW PETERSEN
BUSINESS STAFF: Cathy Boer Glenn Becker.Joe
Broda. Rondi Cigelnik, Maureen Detave Barb
Forslund, Barb Fritz Jeff Gottheim Eric Gutt, Sue
Guszynski, Gayle Halperin, Rosemary Hayes, Kathryn

We think you will like

At Naval Weapons Center we what you hear.

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