100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 11, 1980 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-11-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ge 10-Tuesday, November 11, 1980-The Michigan Daily

4o-op conferees discuss
iutos, energy, the future

iunUay evening, im weexnu s On Sunday, 28 workshops were
SAnn Arbor with hopes for a better presented, including:

Auto co-ops and
energy co-ops
Dave Friedrichs, general manager of
Co-op Auto in Ann Arbor, described his
cooperative auto repair shop and gave
advice on how to begin a co-op business.
Members of Co-op Auto contribute
$100 to the project at the start and run
the business through an elected board
of directors, Friedrichs explained. The
business, like any other co-op, is non-
profit, with most of the proceeds put
back into the shop.;
The purpose of a cooperative
business, according to Friedrichs, is to
"give the consumer the option of having
a professional do the work, coming in
and doing the work themselves on the
weekend, or bringing 'a friend in and
having him help."
Participants also heard discussion of
the "co-op mall," a place in which
every type of service imaginable would
be available, with all stores being run
on a cooperative basis.
Another perspective on co-ops was
provided by Phil Kreitner and Don
Shall, who discussed energy co-ops, in-
cluding wood co-ops which have been
opened in the northern part of the coun-
try where many people depend on wood
to heat their homes.
Worker co-ops
Steve Sachs, coordinator of
publication for the Journal of the
Association for Self-Management, and
John Beck, who is from the Institute of
Labor Investigation, headed a
discussion of the various problems
faced by worker cooperatives.
Beck said that with a labor
movement "hustling for survival," the
best possible circumstance would be for
laborers to "own" their own jobs.
According to Sachs, the basic idea
behind a worker co-op is
TUESDAY SPECIAL
All CHINOS
2O% off
WUOU1~(nickels arcade

"democratizing the workplace."
Whether the business is worker-owned
or management-owned, the co-op en-
courages participation of all employees
in every level of the firm.
Participants in the workshop
described their various problems and
tentative solutions but the complexity
of the topic prevented definitive con-
clusions. "I've been in a worker co-op
for four years," said one man, "and I'm
finally getting an idea of what it's all
about."
Visions for the future
Led by Keith Jardine and Phil Kreit-
ner, this workshop was designed to help
co-op staff members think of their
cooperatives in ideological terms.
Two ideological frameworks were
presented to the staff members. The
first was split into six categories:
Making co-op members do everything
cooperatively; using co-ops to help
fight poverty and gain self-
determination; utilizing cooperatives
to increase economic benefit for all
concerned; establishing, interpersonal
relationships through working
cooperatively, and being responsive to
consumers through the co-op system.
The other framework proposes using
co-ops as a competitive force for
reforming capitalism, for their buying
power within the economic structure,
and to separate their existence from the
rest of the country's economy.
Workshop participants were asked to
think of their co-ops in ideological ter-
ms. Many saw their co-ops as a place to
get cheaper food prices and increased
economic benefits overall. Some said
they wanted to use their co-ops as a
place to begin revolution, while still
others wished to aim their co-ops as a
place for people to co-exist in harmony
and self-determination.
Laichas said that this year's institute
gave him several ideas as to what
future institutes should be like. "Next
year, we'll put more emphasis on
Canadian issues and problems," he
said, referring to the large number of
Canadians that attended.

AP Photo'

The loser by a head
Jockey Robert Attanasio falls head first over his mount, Shake-a-Spear, at the finish line during the second race at
New York's Aqueduct race track yesterday. The race was, literally, won by a head by Czend, left, ridden by jockey Alan
McChesney. Attanasio was taken to a local hospital, where he reportedly was being treated for a back injury.
U.S. auto industry appeal
fortimport reliefrejected

4

WASHINGTON (AP)-The U.S. In-
ternational Trade Commission yester-
day turned down a plea for restrictions
or new taxes on imported cars and
trucks, rejecting arguments by
American automakers who blame
foreign competition for financial losses
and unemployment.
The panel, by a 3-2 vote, conceded
that a rising tide of imports-par-
ticularly from Japan-has seriously
damaged U.S. automakers, but not
enough to justify trade protections
sought by Ford Motor Co. and the
United Auto Workers.
UAW SPOKESMAN Steve
Schlossberg said the union will appeal
to President Carter, although the com-
mission's decision cannot be reversed.
Carter could pursue negotiations to try
to persuade Japanese automakers to
slow down shipments to the United
States, Schlossberg said.
However, John Donaldson, a

spokesman for the U.S. Trade Office,
said the commission ruling means Car-
ter has no legal authority to negotiate
import restrictions with the Japanese.
Donaldson said the White House has
been informed of this by the Justice' .
Department, which determined that at-
tempts to negotiate trade restrictions in
the absence of an ITC finding of injury
would violate anti-trust laws.
Schlossberg said that if Carter does
not act, "then we will have to go to
Congress." He added that President-
elect Ronald Reagan has "expressed
understanding of the problem."
CONGRESS HAS the power to pass
special tariffs or import restrictions, in
spite of the ITC finding. Sen. Howard
Metzenbaum (D-Ohio) was critical of
the ITC decision and said he would set
up meetings with other lawmakers and
the new Republican leadership in the
Senate to discuss possible legislation.
"I cannot say what approach we will

take," Metzenbaum said. "But whether
we move in the direction of import
limits or tariffs, there is no doubt in my
mind that legislative action is needed
and it is needed quickly."
Ford had asked for a temporary five-
year quota to cut by about one million
per year the number of foreign cars
allowed into the country, most from
Japan. The UAW also wanted the'duty
on imported cars raised to 20 percent
and asked that a 25 percent duty on
trucks be maintained.
The commission was told that the
restrictions would give American
automakers tiie to retool their plants
to produce smaller cars U.S. buyers
now want.
But representatives of the Japanese
auto industry contended that Detroit
has suffered because U.S. automakers
were not quick td supply American
buyers with the kind of cars they wan-
ted.

114

Managerial Economics and Decision sciences
at Northwestern University
The doctoral program in Managerial Economics and Decision
Sciences (MEDS), in the J.L. Kellogg Graduate School of
Management at Northwestern University, is an excellent
opportunity for students in economics and mathematics.
The MEDS program offers:
e a rigorous analytical orientation;
e a distinguished faculty drawn from the areas of microeconomics,
decision and game theory, optimization, and stochastic processes;
e fellowships for outstanding applicants;
e an excellent record in placement of graduates in highly rated
academic departments.
For further information and application forms, write:
MEDS DEPARTMENT PH.D. ADVISOR
J.L. KELLOGG GRADUATE SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT
NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY
EVANSTON, ILLINOIS 0201
We do not discriminate with respect to sex, race, creed or national origin.

Seven killed on foggy highway

I

U

From The Associated Press
SAN BERNARDINO, Calif.-A fiery,
chain-reaction pileup of abput two
dozen cars and trucks on a fog-
shrouded freeway yesterday killed at
least seven people and injured 17

NANTUCKET
LONG WAY TO THE TOP
including:
IWs A Long WyToTheTop/Living WithYou
50 More/ ugburn
Too Much Wrong In The Past (For A Future)

IT'S A LONG WAY TO THE TOP OF THE
"STACK OF WAX."
GUESS-THE NUMBER OF
RECORDS IN THE STACK
AND WIN SEASON PASSES
FOR 2

It
pass up j
your chance.::;
Help prevent
birth defects
,

others, the California Highway Patrol
said.
Persons at the scene said they could
hear the repeated sound of cars
crashing but could see nothing in the
dense fog. Motorists, blinded by the fog,
kept slamming into the growing pile of
wreckage.
ONE AND pertaps two of the victims
were believed to have died while trying
to flag down traffic during the accident,
which occured during the morning rush
hour.
As many as two dozen vehicles, eight
of them tractor-trailer trucks, were
believed to have been involved in the
pileup that spread over 500 yards of the
freeway and forced the closing of the
southbound lanes until snow plows
could remove the tangled wreckage.
"You couldn't see. Visibility was
zero," said John Fledz, a motorist from
Devore. "You-could hear it. You could

hear the screeching and the collisions."
ANOTHER DRIVER involved in the.
accident, Jim Stewart, said, "Cars kept
slamming into each other. You couldn't
see them. You could only hear them."
"I'm pretty sure two guys were run
over waving at traffic," Jeff Maxson
said, who described the scene as "a
mess." "All of them were instant
deaths," he added.
The highway patrol is still trying to
determine the cause of the accident and
pinpoint the number of vehicles in-
volved. It apparently began as
motorists descended a long fog-free
grade from Cajon Pass and suddenly
entered a dense fog bank.
A furniture truck carrying new kit
chen ranges caught fire, a sports car
that plowed into its rear was in-
cinerated, and vehicle parts, blood, and
clothing littered the pavement, wit-
nesses said.

4

4

JE 36523 Nantucket is one of the
top live rock bands working today,
and their new album, "Long Way to
the Top," shows they can do it just
as nasty on vinyl.

Bellaire, Michigan

AT

HILTON
Shanty Creek X

-ALSO-
WIN ALBUMS ON COLUMBIA/ EPIC RECORDS

..4WORE THAN JUSTZC~D 7R
lo VARO M

a

r'" n a -n11r -r L-

i n

I

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan