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November 11, 1980 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-11-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, November 11, 1980-Page 7:

Reagan's r

oots

c

7

Family,
LONDON (AP) - Ronald Reag
election climaxes a rags-to-emin
saga that began when his gr
grandfather left a stone shanty
Ireland in the potato famine of
1840s, British and Irish genealog
said yesterday. Further back, V
said, there is royal blood.
Reagan is descended from Br
Boru, an 11th-century high king of
Ireland and the Emerald Isle'sf
national hero, according to exp
from Debrett's research organiza
of London and Hibernian Resea
based in Dublin.
A DEBRETT'S spokesman sai
branch of Reagan's family treeg
back to a nephew of Boru who belon
to the Regans - the way the name
spelled then - of Munster, one
Ireland's ancient provinces.
"Although that was only an unch
their ancestors, it does show ro
blood," he said.
The investigators said the Rea
family, or Regan and O'Regan in
traditional Irish spelling, left Cou
Tipperary, where they had exis
close to the poverty line, after the G
Famine of the 1840s.
WHAT THE experts have pies
together so far shows that Reagan1
be the ninth president of the Un
States with ancestors from Ireland.
The search centered on parish re
ds in Ireland and gravestones in Cou
Tipperary cemeteries. These sho
that Reagan's great-grandfath
Michael O'Regan, left the'
poverished village of Doolis betw

tree traced to Ireland
an's 1845 and 1948, and went to England Tipperary lies at the end of a mil
ence looking for work. muddy lane. The remains of
eat- When he married another Irish building still stand.
y in refugee, Katherine Mulcahy, in St. Until now, the locals had no idea
the George's Cathedral in the London great-grandparents rubbed shou
gists borough of Southwark on October 31, with the forebears of the next pres
they 1852, he signed his name "Reagan," of the United States.
dropping the "O" and inserting an "a." "This is great news," re
rian MICHAEL'S BROTHER, a witness, Ballyporeen schoolmaster L
f all could not write and the priest O'Connor said. "The only well-k
first registered his name with the traditional person to come from these parts b
erts Irish spelling, Regan. was the film star Pat O'Brien."
tion "Michael named his father, though,
arch and gave his birthplace, which is how
we were able to trace him definitely to '
d a the O'Regans of Ballyporeen," Pesketh
goes explained. Ballyporeen is near Doolis.
nged The researchers now are working on
was an important clue found on a
e of gravestone in the Ballyporeen chur-
chyard. The stone, topped by a Celtic
e of cross, bears the legend: "Pray for the
oyal souls of the O'Regan family,
Coolprevane. RIP." Coolprevane is a
gan village near both Doolis andVl eC *
the Ballyporeen.
unty DEBRETT'S SAID Reagan's gran-
sted dfather, John, was born in Peckham,
reat south of London, before the family
emigrated to the United States.xe '
-RNfo n Ih
ced Reagan's father, also named John, 'E G
will was born in Illinois in July 188M and"
ited brought up by his English-born Aunt
Margaret after his parents died.
cor- Although Reagan's parents were
unty married in a Catholic church in Fulton,
wed Ill., in 1904, his mother, a Protestant of
her, Scottish descent, brought him up in her1j
im- faith.
yeen The Reagan homestead in County -'-*

e-long
f the
their
alders
sideit
tired
Larry
nown
efore

Daily Photo by JIM KRUZ
NOW REPRESENTATIVE MARCIA Pupkiewicz, right, criticizes the actions of the Michigan legislature at an Ann Ar-
bor press conference yesterday. Co-sponsored by the ACLU and NOW, the press conference focused on the legislature's
insertion of a ban on state funded abortions into a bill which originally dealt with home heating assistance.
NOWACLU threaten to

Iilepro-abortion

By JANET RAE
In action against what they have
called "the limits of irrespon-
sibility" on the part of the state
Senate, the Michigan Conference of
the National Organization for
Women and the American Civil
Liberties Union yesterday
threatened suit against the
legislature for its handling of a ban
on state-funded abortions.
The organizations are challenging
the constitutionality of the Senate's
rapid re-wording and passage of a
bill originally intended to provide
home heating assistance. The eight-
page bill was converted to a one-
paragraph ban on Medicaid abor-
tions just prior to the Senate's recess
for elections.
EFFORTS BY Lt. Governor
James Brickley to rule the sub-
stitution improper were defeated.
"More seats fell to anti-choice in
this election," said Michele Shemiot,
chairperson for the Reproductive
Rights Task Force of Ann Arbor and
Washtenaw County. "There is a
severe danger of the bill passing."
The bill, called SB 124, is expected
to leave the House Social Servicesr
and Youth com mittee on Thursday,

the day after the legislature recon-
venes. NOW and the ACLU believe
that the re-worded bill will pass the
House late this week and receive a
veto by Gov. William Milliken.
Should the veto be overruled by the
legislature, the organizations would
file suit.
IN AN ANN Arbor news conference
yesterday, NOW representative
Marcia Pupkiewicz called the
Senate's actions "both uncon-
scionable and unconstitutional." She
pointed out that the state con-
stitution mandates that a bill may
not be altered in any way that
changes its original purpose.
The issue, as NOW Legislative
Vice-President Sue Wagner sees it,
is that the Senate not only changed
the intent of the bill, but also waived
all the usual procedures to push the
bill through in less than two hours.
"It is a clear manifestation of their
(anti-abortion legislators) lack of
respect for the legislative process,"
said Wagner.
Attempts by various senators to
include amendments allowing for
Medicaid-funded abortions in the
case of rape, incest, or pregnancy
resulting from a criminal act on a

lawsuit
minor were voted down, Warner
said. Further amendments to allow
for financial aid for indigent
children and to prevent the bill from
taking effect until the Supreme
Court had a chance to rule on its
germaneness, she added, were also
defeated.
SEN. STEPHEN Monsma (D-
Grand Rapids), who initiated the
conversion of the bill, said that while
"the Senate'was stretching its ger-
maneness rule ... this sort of thing
is done by the House frequently."
Monsa said that he was convinced
that a bill similar to SB 124 pending
in the Senate Health and Social Ser-
vices Committee would not be
released from committee because of
the majority of pro-choice advocates
in that particular group.
"The majority of the Senate ought
to take precedence over the
majority of a committee," said
Monsma.
But Wagner claims that the pen-
ding bill only failed passage from
the committee by the vote of one
senator. She thinks it would have
come out of committee eventually
and that SB 124 was rearranged to
guarantee "an abortion bill no mat-
ter what",this year.

U.S. answers Iran's

demands,0o
(Continued from Page 1)
financial aspects" raised by the Iranian
terms.
One U.S. official in Washington, who
asked that his name not be used, told
The Associated Press, "We would like
to be as positive as possible, but they
have to understand the legal and other
complications . .. Generally, it's a
positive response."
CHRISTOPHER was belived to have
told Benyahia that the U.S. government
was in no position to abide by some
aspects of the Iranian demands
because they touch on matters outside
American jurisdiction or in the hands of
the American courts.

n hostages
The four conditions were drawn up in
September by Ayatollah Ruhollah
Khomeini and were ratified by the
Majlis, or Iranian Parliament on
November 2, two days before the U.S.
presidential election.
DISTINCTIVE
HAIRSTYLING FOR
MEN AND WOMEN
Try a1980 NEW LONG or SHORT STYLE
THE DASCOLA
STYLISTS
Arborand.........971-9975
Maple Village .... 761-2733
Liberty off State ..843W-9329
East U. at So. U.... 462-0354

:r

Freighter disappears in Atlantic

From United Press International'
PHILADELPHIA-U.S. Coast Guard
planes searched the Atlantic Ocean
yesterday for a freighter with a crew of
33 Americans that disappeared without
a trace more than two weeks ago.
The S.S. Poet, a converted World War
II troop carrier, left the port of
Philadelphia on October 24 with a cargo
of corn bound for Egypt. It sent a
Toutine radio message as it passed
Cape Henlopen, Del. No com-
munications have been received from it
since.
A COAST GUARD spokesman in New
York said two long-range C-130 search
planes were plying a 13,500 square mile

area east of Delaware Bay in hopes of
finding the 12,000 ton American
freighter. He said all ships in the area
have also been alerted to be on the
lookout for the Poet.
The East coast was caught in the
teeth of a freakish fall storm the day af-
ter the Poet sailed out of Delaware Bay
and some officials speculate the ship
could have gone down during the fierce
weather. The storm, with winds
reaching up to 70 miles per hour and
waves up to 20 feet high, ravaged the
seaboard, sweeping several New Jer-
sey homes into the ocean and one
Panamainian ship,cOcean Endeavor,
onto the beach.

"At this point there is no reason to
believe there is no hope," the Coast
Guard spokesman said. "They could
have lost their antenna and therefore
are unable to send (a message)."
According to the ship's schedule, the
36-year-old Poet should have docked in
Port Said, Egypt on Sunday, but by
yesterday afternoon had still not passed
through the Straits of Gibralter.
Hawaiian Eugenia Corp., the Ship's
owner, reported the Poet missing on
November 3. Coast Guard officials said
the search would be continued until the
area targeted for the search had been
thoroughly scoured.

7

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