100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 11, 1980 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-11-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

High court
rules for
Polish
unions
(Continued from Page1)'
Last month the court, which was

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, November 11, 1980-Page 3
INDIGENT CRIMINAL OFFENDERS ASSISTED
Council OKs legal aid funding.

f
! +
i
f

IRS offices may be moved

to authorize the union charter, inser- Council approved construction of a
ted a clause stating the Communist federal court to be located in the Liber-
Party's supremacy, a move the ty Street Federal Building offices
union leaders said would undermine currently occupied by the Internal
the independence hard-won in last Revenue Service. In hopes of relocating
summer's labor confrontation with the IRS office downtown, Council put
the government. J off action on a resolution that would ap-
The judge also ruled yesterday prove moving the IRS to a Briarwood
against the lower court's area office building, The IRS claims it
modification of the right to strike, cannot find 9,200 square feet of down-
He accepted the proposal by town office space, but Mayor Louis
Solidarity lawyer Wieslaw Chr- Belcher told Council that space may be
zanowski to add an annex to the available on the second floor of the
charter. A lawyer associated with Fourth Avenue Arcade currently oc-
Solidarity said the final agreement cupied by the county CETA offices.
coincided with proposals made "We're going to try to keep both
weeks ago by the trade union facilities downtown," Belcher said.
organization to the government. But,, he added, it may be difficult to
THE ANNEX restates the bases of coordinate the moves and necessary
the union's, creation. They include renovations by the IRS deadline of Dec.
labor organization conventions af- 1.
firming the right to form indepen-
dent unions and portions of the
Gdansk agreement that settled last November named
August's crippling Baltic strikes.
The Gdansk agreement Hands-On Museum Month
acknowledges the party's leading
role.
The crowd gathered outside the In other business, Council proclaimed
court on a gray, blustery day November as Ann Arbor Hands-On
cheered wildly when Walesa Museum month. According to Belcher,
emerged and led them in the singing the museum is undertaking an "am-
of Poland's national anthem and a bitious" fund-raising effort to facilitate
Roman Catholic hymn. the opening of the museum in the old
"We accomplished what we set out fire station. "Council wishes them
to accomplish," he said) well," Belcher said.
* HAPPENINGS
FILMS
AAFC-Apocalypse Now, 6:30,9:30 p.m. Aud. A, Angell Hall.
Cinema Guild-Young Man with a Horn, 7, 9:15 p.m., Lorch Hall Aud.
Public Health Student Assoc.-Acceptabl Risk?, 12 noon, SPH II, Thomas
Francis Auditorium.
Women's Studies Films-3900 Million and One, The Double Day, 7 p.m.,
MLB 3.
SPEAKERS
Academic Women's Caucus-Barbara Sloat, "Increasing the Number of
Women Scientists, and Concerns of Women in Medicine," noon, 3050 Frieze.
Arch. & Urban Planning-Mara Smith, "The Tradition of Sculptured
Brick," noon, AAB Aud.
Ann Arbor Public Schools, Joan Blos, "Children's Literature: Challenge
for the Writer," 12:10p.m., Meeting Room, Main Library.
Anatomy-A. Kent Christensen, "Pituitary Polysomes, or Trying to do
Bochemistry with an Electron Microscope," 12:10 p.m., 5732 Med. Sci. II.
Chemistry-Ben Ware, "The Study of Contractibility by Fluorescence
Photobleaching Techniques, 4p.m., 1300 Chem. Bldg.
Computing Ctr.-"Chalk Talk," Simple Sorting Using SORT, 12:10 p.m.,
1011 NUBS.
ECC and IC-Frank Whitmore, "Southeast Asia: Past and Present,"
noon, International Center.
English Comp. Board-Barbara Morris, Frances Zorn, John Reiff,
"Responding to Students' Writings," 4-6 p.m., 1025 Angell Hall.
Geology-Lloyd Pray, "Significance of Submarine Erosion on Platform
Margins," 4 p.m., 4001 CCL.
Inst. for Values and Science-Victor Weiskoph, "The Double-Edged Sword
of Technology?," 4 p.m., MLB 4.
Mech. Engin. and Applied Mech.-Yoram Koren, "Industrial Robots,"
noon, 325 W. Engin.
Society of Christian Engineers-Lecture by Tom Trevethan, noon,
League.
Spanish-Tony Esposito, "Phonic Embellishment and Thematic Reinfor-
cement in the Poema Del Mio Cid,"noon, MLB 4th floor Commons.
Women of 'U' Faculty-Donald Huelke, "Automobile Accidents and
Related Legislation," 7:,30p.m., Vaughn SPH 3rd floor lounge.
MEETINGS
Biological Research Review Comm-4 p.m., 3087 SPH I.
His House Christian Fellowship-7:30 p.m., League Rooms D and E.
HSO-Lesbian/Gay Male Health Professions meeting, 7:30 p.m., 802
Monroe.
Int'l. Relations Society-7 p.m., Union Pendleton Room.
MSA-7:30 p.m., 3909 Union.
PIRGIM-Energy Task Force meeting, 7:30 p.m., Union Conference
Room 4.
TM Program-Introductory meeting, 8 p.m., UGLI Multipurpose Room.
PERFORMANCES
Residential College-Reading by Writer-in-Residence Joan Blos, 8 p.m.,
EQ Benzinger Library.
School of Music-Voice recital by Willis Patterson, 8 p.m., Rackham
Auditorium.

MISCELLANEOUS
CEW-Book reviews, Eliana Moya-Raggio: "Supremadre: Women in
Politics" by Elisa Chaney, "Eva Peron: The Myths of the Woman" by Julie
Taylor, noon, Union Pendleton Room.
CMB-Susan Ernst, Sem., "RNA Pololations in Isolated Blastomeres of
Early Sea Urchin Embryos," noon, 1139 Nat. Sci.
International Center - Tuesday Luncheon Series, co-sponsored by the
Ecumenical Campus Center, Church Women United, and the International
Center, noon, International Center Rec. Room.
International Folk Dance Club-Teaching, beginning folk dance, 7-8:15
pmBell Pool Mezz.
Meekreh-Felafe Study break, 10:30 p.m., Jordal Lounge (Mojo).
Rec. Sports-Clinic, "Setting up an Aerobic Program," 7:30-9 p.m., 1250
CCRB.
Rec. Sports-IM Racquetball (AC-d) Tournament, 6:30 p.m., IMSB.
SCO and Dean's Office-Dean's Tea with Math Dept., 3:30-5 p.m., 3212
Angell.
Sigma. Theta Tau-Program, Ruth Ryan, Jacque Clinton, Elizabeth See,
"Nursing: A Female Profession in a Male Society," 7:30 p.m., Campus Inn.
SWE-Reception, dinner, Lec., Jill Pollock, Ford Motor Co., "Career
management and Opportunities," 6p.m., Campus Inn.
I TT AVW r(I Tmn..a,... Tlne '7- n~ mv Uninn Rllr1nnm.

By ELAINE RIDEOUT
City Council last night unanimously
authorized the use of $5,000 in Federal
Community Development Block Grant
funds to provide legal services to low
and middle income criminal offenders
in designated CDBG areas.
According to Mayor Louis Belcher,
the allocation will subsidize services
formerly provided by the Model Cities
Legal Clinic,
"The agency notified the (15th
District) court system last week that as
of last Friday they could not handle any
more criminal cases in court," Belcher
told Council. "This (resolution) is to
provide those people in the CDBG area
with legal counsel," he added.
COMMUNITY Development Director
Barry Tilmann said the legal clinic
closed its doors Nov. 1 because of an
agency audit dispute with the city.
Funding of the legal service nd
Model Cities Health Center was fro en

Sept. 5 when the agencies refused to
cooperate with a city-ordered audit of
their financial records.
An audit became necessary when the
city learned from Internal Revenue
Service reports that the health center
had failed to report to the city half of its
income earned over a four-year period,
thereby constituting a breach of con-
tract, city officials claimed.
"WE DID not feel it was wise to hold
up the criminal defense system while
the city and the Modcl Cities Legal
Clinic ironed out their differences,"
Belcher said.
City Attorney Bruce Laidlaw ex-
plained that the city is required under
federal law to provide legal represen-
tation to needy residents. Court-
appointed lawyers will be subsidized
through the general fund until the legal
service allocation is made available.
Belcher explained that the $5,000
allocation was taken from the $112,000
in legal service assets frozen in Sep-

tember. "If the money runs out before
we can come to an agreement (with the
legal service), council will authorize
more of the funds," he said.
Barring resolution of the dispute,
Tilmann said, the service could be
resumed by the legal agency or taken
over by someone else.
TILMANN SAID the council.
resolution does not say how the $5,000 is
to be appropriated, but he said
distribution details will be ironed out by
the CDBG citizen advisory committees.
According to City Administrator
Terty Sprenkel, the city will take no ac-
tion 'on the audit dispute until they
receive a recommendation from
Department of Housing and Urban
Development officials.
But Councilman Kenneth Latta (D-
1st Ward) said he heard from an "in-
side source" that the Detroit Legal
Council of HUD will make no recom-

mendation until they can resolve the
issue. Latta said this would entail sen-
ding the problem "up through the levels
in Washington. This would mean we
won't be getting anything terribly
soon," Latta said.
CDBG Director Tilmann said that in,
discussing the audit dispute with Model
Cities directors, the agency has offered
to comply with a full city audit "from,
now on" provided they are exempted
from revealing past records.
TONIGWT 8 PM
A READING BY
ENZINGER LIBRARY
EAST QUAD
(East University
between Hill and Willard)

Read and Use Daily Classifieds I
Call 764-0557
Rd

0)

OPMVVEWHTE
UVUIEI REVIEW
TUESDAY, NOV. 11
Tickets: $3.50 in advance. $4.00 at the door,
Available at Discount Records. Schoolkids'. Aura Sounde, and at Rick's.

nation
plidable r
rtici-

I
U

\\ " N
,
. .
... ...
w ..
...
..

C 3

,INVOLVED PROFESSIONALS
You may not think of Amoco as one of the nation's leading petroleum companies, but it's true. Amoco companies, subsidiaries
of Standard oil Company of Indiana, are all growing steadily, and that means we have carper opportunities for Engineering
graduates. Positions are available with the following Amoco company:
Amoco Production Company
Ranks fifth out of more than 3,000 companies in oil production
Is among the nation's top three companies in gas production
Has opportunities for Petroleum, Mechanical and Chemical Engineers as well as other engineering disciplines
When you become part of Amoco, you will receive an outstanding starting salary and benefits that rank among the best in the

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan