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October 30, 1980 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-10-30

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I

SPORTS

Page 8 Thursday, October 30, 1980 The Michigan Daily

State school ADs

By JON MORELAND
Ask Gil Canale, Pat Clysdale, Dr. Chalmer ,
Hixson, and Bob Becker how they're voting on
Proposal 'D' in the election, and they'll reply
with a slightly sarcastic and extremely ner-
vous laugh.
These men are currently the athletic direc-
tors at Northern Michigan, Western Michigan,
Wayne State, and Saginaw Valley State, but all
four claim that passage of the Tisch Amen-
dment would essentially put an end to the need
for their position at these state-supported
schools.
"WE WOULD NO longer have inter-
collegiate sports at Northern Michigan Univer-
sity," Canale said. "I can't say when, but I've
been told by administrators that athletics
would be the first to go."
The proposal calls for drastic cutbacks in
many state supported functions, with colleges

and universities being among the hardest hit.
Under the Tisch System, Michigan, Michigan
State, and Wayne State would receive ap-
proximately one-half of the funds they are now
receiving, while the other institutions would
lose all state support.
"That's 68 percent of our income gone,"
reports Western's Clysdale. "It's unbelievable
to even think about it. The entire university
would have to make some drastic changes, and
there would be no hope for intercollegiate
athletics."
AMONG THE CHANGES that would be
brought by passage of the amendment, said
Clysdale, would be higher costs and smaller
enrollment. "Tuition would be tripled, so it
would be cheaper for the students to go out of
state."
Hixson agreed that the situtation, should
Tisch pass, would look equally bleak for Wayne

State's athletics. "It woul
program," he maintains,
program."
"We would do our best to p]
ts (with other schools) but th,
said.

fear Proposal 'D
d be nix for the make other cutbacks in the areas of student ac- Michigan and Notre Dame in ou
"the end of our tivities, all four directors concluded. ference." (The two schools will
"In addition to our intercollegiate athletics," tral Collegiate Hockey Associ
ay out our contrac- said Hixson, "we'd have to cut out our in- with the 1981-82 season.) "We'd h
at would be it," he tramurals, recreation services, and sports great opportunity to enhance our
clubs. THE EFFECT THE proposal

ur hockey con-
enter the Cen-
ation starting
ate to lose this
odvposition."
would have on

BECKER AT Saginaw Valley was not as
pessimistic about the effects of the proposal,
but he admitted the situation looked bad. "It's
hard to say which sports would be cut. It
depends on the degree to which we'll be forced
to cut back."
Becker explained how the decision as to
which sports to be cut will be made. "The list
(of sports in order of priority) has already been
made. We'll just have to wait and see where we
draw the line eliminating sports.
"WE TRY NOT to think about it, but we have
to," Becker continued.
Each school affected would be forced to

"ALL WE WOULD have left would be a drop
in time in the rec. building-and I'm not even
sure we'd have enough money to keep that
open," he said.
The possibility of dropping back to non-
scholarship sports has come up at at least one
campus--Northern Michigan. But that idea
was soon eliminated. "We've been told we can't,
even go bck to Division III," Canale said.
"It's a shame, too," he continued. "Our
athletics have brought prominence to the entire
school. The football team has been extremely
successful, and now we've got the University of

the Michigan and Michigan State athletics
would be less, because they have more sports
related revenue, said Michigan football coach
Bo Schembechler.
"I was talking to (Michigan State football
coach) Muddy (Waters)," said Schembechler.
"And he and I agree that the thing would
probably eliminate all athletics at a place like
Saginaw Valley State.
"I'm concerned about the negative effect it
would have on education. I'm automatically-
voting against it, and everybody else that is
concerned with education had better vote
against it."

STATE TOURNEY NEXT IN LINE:

'

Interviews For
LSA Student Gov't
Elections Director
November 3
Information & Applications
Availoble-4003 Michigan Union
Also interviewing for
MSA positions

Stickers post an honest' win, 1-0

U
U

~jflA40
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0

By MARTHA CRALL
The honesty of junior co-captain
Betsy Coke took away what would have
been a 2-0 Michigan field hockey win,
and instead gave the stickers a slim 1-0
victory over a tenacious Toledo squad
yesterday at Ferry Field.
Coke added what looked to be an in-
surance goal to the Wolverines' 1-0 lead
with about 10 minutes left in the second
half. Toldeo goalie Liz Waltz blocked
three straight Blue shots before Coke
slammed the ball into the left corner of
the net past Waltz's outstretched arms.
The officials ruled the shot a legal goal
giving Michigan a very short-lived 2-0
lead.,
SEVERAL ROCKETS protested the
call, led by Waltz. Co-captain Alex
Callam and Coke proceeded to inform
GRIDDE PICKS
Contrary to published reports, the
athletic meeting held at Crisler Arena
two nights ago was not to discuss Title
IX, hazing, or any other irrelevant
University matters. The meeting of the
minds was called to discuss this week's
Gridde Picks. If you wish to qualify for
a free one-item pizza from Pizza Bob's,
have your picks to the Daily offices, 420
Maynard, by midnight Friday.
1. MICHIGAN at Indiana
(pick score)
2. Ohio St. at Michigan St.
3. Purdue at Northwestern
4. Minnesota at Illinois
5. Wisconsin at Iowa
6. S. Carolina at Georgia
7. Missouri at Nebraska
8. N. Carolina at Oklahoma
9. Navy at Notre Dame
10. Miami, Fla. at Penn St.
11. Mississippi at LSU
12. Auburn at Florida
13. Pittsburgh at Syracuse
14. Kentucky at Tulane
15. UCLA at Arizona
16. Holy Cross at Columbia
17. Kansas at Kansas, St.
18. Central Mich. at Eastern Mich.
19. Slippery Rock at Lockhaven St.
20. DAILY LIBELS at Presidential
Debates

the official that the ballhad slid under-'
neath side, rather than the front, of the
goal and in. At that point, the score was
returned to 1-0.
Toledo coach Kirpal Singh-Mahal
was displeased with the officiating all'
game. "The officials were not wat-
ching. There were three off-sides not
called before they (Michigan) scored
the first time, and the second goal,
well..."
Sophomore forward Marty Maugh
tallied Michigan's first goal at 17:00 in
the second half. The Wolverines had
driven down the field, and in her paten-
ted style, Waltz moved halfway out to
the scoring line between the goal and
the scoring circle in an attempt to block
the shot. With a quick lateral move,.

Maugh eluded her, however, and drove
about ten more feet before scoring into
an unguarded net.
"I WAS PLEASED with the way we
played today," said Wolverine coach
Candy Zientek after the game. "And I
was especially pleased with the honesty
of Alex and Betsy in telling the official
that the call was wrong and the goal
hadn't gone straight into the net."
The first half of play was a battle of
the defenses. Each team had several
opportunities to score, but the goalies,
Waltz and freshman Nancy Hirsch,
kept the ball out of the net. Hirsch
picked up her second' consecutive
shutout, the first coming last weekend
against Ball State, 2-0.

"THEIR (MICHIGAN'S) defense ws
very good. Our defense was good too.
We played pretty well," said a dejected
Singh-Mahal.
The Wolverines completed :their
regular seaon with an 11-7 record. The
loss left the Rockets at 12-6-1 for the
year.
Michigan begins post-season play this.
weekend in East Lansing with the'
SMAIAW tournament, the champion of
which will represent the state in the
MAIAW Midwest regional next month.
The stickers' first opponent on Friday
will be Central Michigan, which beat
the Wolverines twice earlier this
season.
The second
season
IT MAY NOT mean a trip to the Rose
Bowl, but this intramural football game
is just as important to both of these two
teams as the playoffs kicked off last
night. The playoffs will last into
November and a single elimination
process will determine the winner, of
both the A and B Divisions.

if You Find Your Name and Address in Today's Mich-
igan Daily Classified Page
YOU WIN
TWO FREE TICKETS
To Any One Of
STATE 1-2-3-4
MIDNIGHT MOVIES
If Your Name and Address Appear, Call Our Business Office
at 764-0560 (9 a.m.-5 p.m.), 420 Maynard., Within 48 Hours.
5 WINNERS EVERY DAY! NO CONTEST TO ENTER!

Daily Photo by DEBBIE LEWIS

Rent a Car from Econo -Car

Celts pummel hapless

Econo- Car
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761-8845

ECONO-CAR
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Pistons,103-85

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U of M students 19 years old and older
Rent a Ford or another fine car

(fATTENTIONCOLLEGE SENIORS

By MARK FISCHER
Special to the Daily
PONTIAC-The Pistons longest win
streak of the season (one game), was
shattered last night by the visiting
Boston Celtics; who outshot, outpassed,
and outskilled their inept hosts to win
going away, 103-85.
The Celtics never outscored Detroit
in one quarter by more than six points,
but it didn't take more than that, as the
40 percent shooting Pistons gave the
game away gradually.
DETROIT JUMPED out to an early
8-2 lead, but it didn't last long as the
Celts tied it up at 16 with five minutes
remaining and went ahead to stay, 29-
26, when Tiny Archibald converted a
three-point play to end the first quarter.
In the second quarter Boston padded

their lead to a comfortable margin,:as
Detroit committed nine turnovers, shot
only 40 percent from the floor and
Boston's Cedric Maxwell scored 10
points, giving the Celts a 58-49 halftime
advantage.
The third period picked up where the
second period left off, as Boston got into
their passing, fast-break attack and
outshot their hapless foes from the floor
by a 3 to 2 margin.
This trend continued in the fourth
quarter and the Silverdome fans star-
ted to head for the exits. With seven
minutes left, the only Boston starter
still in was' Archibald, but it didn't
make any difference, as the Pistons'
fourth period shooting clip was like that
of a grade school team (28 percent),
and they found themselves to be the less
than proud owners of a 1-8 record.
.1

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I

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