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October 30, 1980 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-10-30

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, October 30, 1980-Page 7

Campaign,
drawing to
* a close
for Carter,
Reagan

CLEVELAND (AP)-President Carter and
Ronald Reagan took up their campaign debate at
a distance yesterday, back among the voters in
parallel quests for the support of major swing
states that will make one of them a winner on
Election Day.
In the brief balance of their long White House
contest, the two will be concentrating on much
the same territory: the battleground states
which carry the bulk of the electoral votes.
CARTER, IN PITTSBURGH, forecast a top-to-
bottom victory for the Democratic ticket next
Tuesday, and accused Reagan of misstating his
own positions in the debate.
Reagan, in Houston, said Carter "refused to
defend his record, he couldn't defend it, so he
changed the subject." He said Carter economic
policies "are leading us into the dark ages."
Both major party candidates claimed satisfac-

tion and campaign gains out of their nationally
broadcast debate in Cleveland Tuesday night. An
Associated Press poll indicated that Reagan and
Carter gained just about equally in the eyes of
the registered voters who viewed the 90-minute
confrontation-their first and last.
THE SURVEY ALSO said that the television
audience leaned Reagan's way before the debate
began. In the judgment of those viewers, Reagan
did the better job as'a debater; 46 percent saw it
that way, 34 percent said Carter did best.
But neither Reagan nor Carter carved
significantly into the support of the other. The
debate, it appeared, firmed opinions about the
two candidates, but did not markedly change
them. Their post-debate gains came largely
among people who had been undecided, with a
handful of registered voters who had sided with
independent John Anderson switching to one of

the major party contenders.
Anderson, campaigning in Philadelphia, said
the debate created the perception that the con-
test is now a two-man affair, between Carter and
Reagan. Anderson, who didn't make the
Cleveland debate team, has staked his third-man
campaign against exactly'that view. He said he
would keep "trying very hard to remedy that,"
and insisted that he isn't out of the running.
REAGAN SAID THE debate left his campaign
"in very good shape." He said he wished it could
have lasted another 90 minutes, so that he could
have continued to' challenge Carter on "the
falsehoods that have been told numerous times
by the whole Carter campaign."
Reagan, who had said he wanted to focus in the
closing days of the campaign on Carter's
"economic record of misery and despair," let
pass several opportunities to say how he could do

better than Carter.
Reagan spent much of the 90-minute debate
seeking to portray himself as a man of peace to
offset the warmonger image that Carter has
tried to tag him with. He wanted to come across
as presidential, and he may well have suc-
ceeded.
CARTER WAS CAMPAIGNING in Pittsburgh,
Rochester, N.Y., Newark, then Philadelphia.
Pennsylvania and New Jersey are on the list of
big, tossup states, crucial to the outcome of next
Tuesday's election. Reagan will be working in
both before the week is out.

The Republican nominee went straight
Texas, another swing state, to campaign
Houston, Ft. Worth and Dallas. Carter willl
hunting Texas votes on Saturday.

to
in
be

.L _1_ J_ -A_ -A_ _L

1_ _ 1_ > a l a a l a a a a

CITE $11 MILLION DECLASSIFYING PRACTICE AS TOO EXPENSIVE:
Auditors: Cut top secret review

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WASHINGTON (AP)-The General
-Accounting Office recommended
yesterday that the government aban-
don its practice of systematically
reviewing all old classified documents
,04d declassifying those that can safely
be made public.
At issue are 617 million pages dealing
with state secrets of war, peace,
-diplomacy, arms control, espionage,
trade negotiations, and other gover-
nirnent activities in the area of national
security.

THE _GAO, a government watchdog
agency, cited the $11 million it costs
each year to pay people employed
solely to review the old papers.
But its proposal drew criticism from
the National Archives, storehouse of old
government records, and from Steven
Garfinkel; director of the Information
Security Oversight Office.
He called the proposal "drastic,"
"insupportable," "one-dimensional"
and "illogical."
The GAO recommended abandoning
the systematic review of classified

documents put into effect by an
executive order signed by President
Carter in 1978.
CARTER DIRECTED agencies to
look at all classified documents as they
become 20 years old and declassify
those that can be disclosed without
harm to the government.
Previously, documents were not
reviewed until they were 30 years old.
The GAO said more than 155 agencies
hold 617 million pages of documents
requiring review.
The agencies include the FBI, CIA,

Arms Control and Disarmament Agen-
cy, U.S. Information Agency, and the
departments of State, Justice, Com-
merce and Defense. Also on the list are
many agencies no longer in existence.
Instead of systematically reviewing
all classified papers, the GAO recom-
mended that the government examine
only those requested or likely to be
requested by members of the public,
chiefly historians. It estimated that 90
percent of the declassified papers are of
no interest to historians or the public.

WJJX CHEAP FLICKSI
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Student groups fight Tisch proposal

r.

(Continued from Page 1)
MSA member Jon Feiger,. who also
helped organize the rally, said it is im-
portant for students to realize the
potential impact of the Tisch tax cut
proposal. "It's not just your tax dollars
at stake. It's your education," Feiger
said, adding that it might "take
education 30 years to recover from
Tisch."
Feiger said that MSA would continue
to fight the proposal through campus
leafletting, postering, and a "Get Out
to Vote" drive on election day.
"IT'S IMPORTANT that students get
out to vote," Feiger said, "and to vote
against Tisch."
Solomon said that LSA-SG will also
continue to wage battle against the
proposed tax cut, by also participating
in the effort to increase student turnout
at the polls. "We're going to help on
Nov. 4," Solomon said. "People are
going to be out at the polls to campaign
against Tisch."
Feiger and Solormon said students
will go door-to-door in University dor-
ms and off-campus housing in an effort
to increase student voter turnout.

RAY BRACE, chairman ofthe Ann
Arbor Libertarian League, however,
said that although his group strongly
supports the proposaLit will make little.
effort to campaign because, in Ann Ar-
bor, the tax cut proposal is "a lost
cause."
"We're not doing anything actively,"
Brace said. "There's so much Univer-
sity money going to combat Tisch" that
campaigning in support would not be,
productive.
The Pan-Hellenic Association, the
group that coordinates sororities, is
providing information on the proposal
to its members, but will not take an of-
ficial position, according to its
president, Kathy Kelly.
"We're not doing anything other than
consciousness awareness," Kelly said,
adding that speakers have explained
the proposal at meetings of the Pan-
Hellenic Association. Kelly said that
her organization is providing infor
mation "just so everyone knows the
ramifications of the proposal-pro and
con."
MSA MEMBER Reid Butler said he
is also planning on canvassing Greek

houses in an effort to educate fraternity
members about the Tisch proposal.
A small, random sampling of studen-
ts on the Diag yesterday indicated that
although students overwhelmingly op-
pose the Tisch proposal, few plan to ac-
tively campaign against it.

Music School junior Dan Meyers,
however, said he spoke in opposition to
the proposal at a rally in his hometown
of Manistee, Michigan. He said that the
proposal's impact on local high schools
is the major concern of his hometown.

ALL THE KING'S MEN
TONIGHT at 7:00 & 9:00 LORCH
Based on Robert Penn Warren's novel. Also based on the career of Huey
Long, America's only homegrown dictator, who ruled Louisiana with an iron
whip. The rich mingle ruthless ambition with the preaching of social idealism.
The poor don't buy it and a populist upstart gains recruits in complacent
strongholds. Won plenty of Oscars. Plus short feature.
Friday: DEAD NIGHT AT CG
CINEMA GUILD souls in.celluloid
r A A1 A 1 - --A - _ L I f - _A AJA A1A1

WE CAN' FfiY?
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AFPlay
by - a cov1emeorcary
v D ┬░oAVIAX Po 'ca coedy-
Oct. 3 gPM
NOV. I2.
w-

A A A A A r A r A r r r a r r r a r r r

Diag rally held to
h "

oppose I ci
(Continued from Page 1Y
this place would not be recognizable if
the Tisch amendment passes."
MICHIGAN Student Assembly
President Marc Breakstone also spoke
at the rally, sponsored jointly by the
LSA-Student Government and MSA,
calling the Tisch proposal a "death sen-
tence against the University of
Mchigan," and asking students to ac-
tively oppose it.
"Can we allow higher education in
Michigan to go down the proverbial
drain of Shiawassie drain Com-
missioner Robert Tisch?" Breakstone
asked the crowd to a rousing chorus of
""No!"
"We're talking about the survival of
the University," Breakstone said,
calling Proposal D "the Tisch
Holocaust."
MSA member Jon Feiger, who helped

ft tax cut

organize the rally with LSA Student
Government President Dan Solomon,
said he hoped the rally would serve to
mobilize student opposition to the
proposal.
PITCHER
NIGHT
at
t out#
1140 South University
668-8411

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Q. What's Available, Accessable, and Almost free?
4. A Michig'an Doiy Sox Number!

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