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October 18, 1980 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1980-10-18

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Page 2-Saturday, October 18, 1980-The Michigan Daily
HEA VY FIGHTING CONTINUES IN KHUR RAMSHAHR
Iranian prime mnmister visits U.N.

From AP and UPI
Iranian Prime Minister
Mohammad Ali Rajai, highest-ranking
Iranian to visit the United States since
the American hostages were seized,
met yesterday with U.N. Secretary
General Kurt Waldheim and they
discussed the Persian Gulf was and "a
number of other issues."
Waldheim was expected to raise the
question of the 52 Americans held
hostage for the last 349 days in Tehran,
but there was no immediate word on
whether they talked about the hostage
situation.
Rajai spent 90 minutes closeted with
Waldheim and a U.N. spokesman would
release no further details other than to
say the two discussed Iran's conflict
with Iraq and "a number of other
issues."
A SHORT TIME after the meeting,

the Security Council began its session,
which Rajai addressed.
"We are here to discuss Iraq's in-
vasion of my country," he said. "My
people are being shot and bombed and
shelled. We have 50,000 casualties, why
should we worry about 52 Americans?"
He said Iraq, in the 26-day-old war
with Iran, has bombed schools and
hospitals, "killing innocent people."
IN AN ANGRY reference to Iraqi
President Saddam Hussein, he told the
council, "The entire world must know
that Saddam's army has acted without
mercy, without pity, like Hitler's ar-
mies."
Rajai's special envoy, Ali Shams Ar-
dakani, told reporters before the prime
-minister spoke that Iran would not
agree to a cease fire.
"Nobody asks for a cease-fire when
somebody is defending his house," he
said. He added he was "not optimistic"
about prospects for a meeting between

Rajai and President Carter on the issue
of 52 American hostages who yesterday
spent their 349th day as captives of
Iranian militants.
ARDAKANI dismissed speculation of
a swap involving the hostages and
American spare parts needed for
Iranian weapons, saying, "Spare parts
is your issue, not my issue. Our boys
are fighting with what they have."
Ardakani snapped at newsmen: "The
.country is at war and you keep talking
about hostages!" Because of the United
States, Ardakani said, Iran had been
held hostage by the late Shah Moham-
mad Reza Pahlavi for a quarter of a
century after the monarch was restored
to power with CIA help in 1953.
On the battlefront, Iraq ceaselessly
shelled the burning refinery city of
Abadan and Iran said bitter block-by-
block battles raged in the heart of
Khurramshahr in the 26th day of the
war.

BUT BOTH Iranian cities, under in-
tense artillery barrage and air attack
for weeks, stubbornly refused to fall to
Iraqi forces.
Tehran radio, broadcasting a stream
of military communiques, said "heavy
battles" raged near the railway station
and port offices of Khurramshahr on
the Shatt-al-Arab waterway whose port
area Iraqi forces occupied a week ago
Monday.
Iran claimed civilians and soldiers
fighting "street by street and trench by
trench" repulsed Iraqi forces from the
port city of Khurramshahr yesterday
and said the Iraqis were also thrown
back 13 miles on a key northern front.
In a later dispatch, the Iranina com-
mand said Iraqi forces in Khurram-
shahr "are now abandoning their
positions one after the other in a state of
defeat and disgrace. The Iraqi mer-
cenaries are leaving behind arms and
ammunition."

Depts.
By MAURA CARRY
It's still too early to determine the full
impact of the hiring freeze announced
at the Regents meeting Thursday, but a
sampling of department reactions gives
a hint of what may be in store for the
University community.
Billy Frye, University vice president
for academic affairs, told the Regents'
that most vacant positions at the
University will not be filled until the
financial crunch eases.
Frye said the move was necessary
because the state is allocating the
University less money than the Regents
expected when they drew up the ten-
tative budget during the summer.
THE REACTIONS and predictions

react to
solicited yesterday do not necessarily
represent a trend or a pattern for all
departments, but they do reveal how
some units are dealing with the latest
phase of the financial crisis.
Psychology Department Chairman
Warren Norman said the announ-
cement put his department in a grim.
situation that has been "getting con-
tinually worse over the last ten years.'
Norman said the department has
several open positions that were to be
filled after a review next month. Now
there is no telling when the department
will be able to fill the slots.
"EVEN IF THEY (the positions un-
der review) were approved, we can't
hire now," Norman said. He added that
his department could currently use two

hiringfr,
or three additional full-time people.
Norman said that due to the staff
shortage, the psychology department
will have to temporarily close several
courses for the winter term.
SUCH A PRACTICE presents a
problem for the department because it
has no way of knowing if there is still in-
terest in a course if it is temporarily'
suspended. Unless the University
receives more funding next year, those
courses may not be reopened at all, he
said.
Norman said the psychology depar-
tment is being hit particularly hard
because it is so large. Twenty percent
of the students who enrolled in
psychology courses this term had to be
wait-listed, and thg hiring freeze will

Q lnrb Un ip '0 eruicr

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
120 S. State St.
(Corner of State and Huron)
Worship Schedule:
8:30 a.m.-Holy Communion in the
Chapel.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Morning Wor-
ship in the Sanctuary.
Sermon for Oct. 19-"Mercy in the
Traditional Way" by Rev. W. Thomas
Schomaker.
Church School for all ages-9:30 a m.
and 11 a.m.
Choir Rehearsal-Thursday at 7:15
p.m.
Ministers:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Rev. Fred B. Maitland
Dr. Gerald R. Parker
Education Directors: Rose McLean
and Carol Bennington
}CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
A Campus Ministry of the Christian
Reformed Church
- Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
10:00 a.m.-Morning Worship,
"God's Radical Grace," Guest Speak-
er, Dr. J. Harold Ellens.
6:00 p.m.-Service of Holy Com-
munion followed by supper.
* * *
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
10:00 a.m.-Morning Worship: Guest
Preacher, Dr. Robert Middleton, "Bar-
riers to Believe."
11:00 a.m.-Sunday School (for all
ages).
"American Baptist Campus
Foundation"
All students and faculty are invited
to attend worship service at 10 a.m. in
the sanctuary and Sunday School
Classes at 11 a.m. in the Guild House.
Theology Discussion Group every
Thursday at 6 p.m.
(Complimentary brunch on second
Sunday of each month.)

LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(The Campus Ministry of the ALC-LCA)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
Oct. 17th thru Oct. 19th-Retreat.
Worship Service-Sunday at 10:30.
Tuesday-Bible Study, 7:30 p.mu.
Wednesday-Choir Practice, 7 p.m.
NEWPORT FELLOWSHIP
(Free Methodist Church)
1951 Newport Rod-665-6100
Sunday School-9:45 a.m.
Worship-11:00 a.m.
(Nursery and Children's Worship).
Evening Worship-6:00 p.m.
Robert Henning, Pastor, 663-9526
* * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.-662-4466
(between S. University and Hill)
Campus Ministry Program
Campus Minister-Carl Badger
Worship Services-Sunday, 9:30 a.m.
and 11 a.m.
Student Fellowship-Sunday at 4:00
p.m. (French room). Dinner $1.50.
Tuesday-Bible Introduction, 6:30
p.m. Bible Study, 8:00 p.m.
WESLEY FOUNDATION
at the University of Michigan
' (313) 668-6881
602 E. Huron at State
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104
A fellowship, study, and social issues
ministry for the university community.
TOM SCHMAKER, Chaplain/Director
ANN WILKINSON, Office Manager
This week's program:
Sunday, Oct. 19:
5:30 p.m.-Worship.
6:00 p.m.-Shared Meal followed by
Fellowship.
Wednesday, Oct. 22:
7:30 p.m.-Bible Study.
Thursday, Oct. 23:
7:30 p.m.-Peacemakers.

CHAPEL (Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekly Masses:
Sat.-7:00 p.m."
Sun.-7:30 a.m., 9:00 a.m., 10:30
a.m. (after 10:30 upstairs and down-
stairs) 12:00 noon, 5:00 p.m. (upstairs
and downstairs).
North Campus Mass;at 930 a.m. in-
Bursley Hall (Fall and Winter terms).
Rite of Reconciliation-4 p.m.-5 p.m
on Friday only; any other time by
appointment.
* * *
CHURCH OF SCIENTOLOGY
Huran Valley Mission
809 Henry St.
668-6113
Sunday Service-2:30 p.m.
Rev. Marian K. Kuhns.
* * *
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
Serving the Campus for LC-MS
Robert Kavasch, Pastor
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
663-5560
Sunday:
Sunday Worship-9:15 and 10:30
a.m. Bible Class-9:15 a.m.
Wednesday:
Handbell Choir-7:30 p.m.
Chapel Choir-8:30 p.m.
Midweek Service-10:00 p.m.
* * *
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF THE NAZARENE
409 South Division
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Rev. Steve Bringardner, 761-5941
Sunday:
Christian Education-9:45 a.m.
Service of Worship-11:00 a.m.
"Time of Meeting"-6:00 p.m.
Monday thru Friday-"Spiritual
Deepening Meetings" (the week of the
20th).
Wednesday-Class "A Preface to
C.S. Lewis." (7:30 p.m.).

eeze
only make things worse, Norman said.
He cited experimental and develop-
mental psychology courses as being
particularly understaffed.
NOT ALL departments will feel the
crunch as hard as the psychology
department, however.
Frank Casa, chairman of the roman-
ce languages department, said his
department will not feel the effect of
the freeze this year.
"We're taking one year at a time,"
Casa said. There may be some
movement in the department next year,
but the freeze may be off by then, he
said.
The chemistry department, on the
other hand, currently has two vacant
positions, one of which just opened
yesterday, department chairman
Thomas Dunn said.
DUNN SAID that it was too early to
know how the freeze would affect the
number of course sections offered. "I
would like notto close sections if we can
help it," he said.
Dunn said that no sections would be
canceled for the winter term, but said
there might be reductions for the spring
term.
The staff shortage could mean
someone would have to take on a double
or triple load, Dunn said. He added that
this would not help University standar-
ds because it cuts into the time
professors can spend on research.
"This could be serious if it keeps
See FREEZE, Page 3
EMU
imposes,
freeze
on hiring
By NANCY BILYEAU
Faced with possible budget cuts,
Eastern Michigan University imposed
a hiring freeze last week similar to the
freeze announced here Thursday by
Billy Frye, University of Michigan
vice-presidentnforacademic affairs.
EMU's freeze, announced Oct. 6, will
affect about 40 currently vacant faculty
and staff positions out of a pool of some
1,600 jobs, said June Davis, EMU's per-
sonel director.
ACCORDING TO Frye, 250 positions
at the University of Michigan will not
be filled until the current financial
crunch eases. The hiring freeze,
estimated to save the University ap-
proximately $3 million this year, affec-
ts some 8,047 faculty and staff positions,
according to Robert Sauve, assistant to
-the vice-president for academic affairs.
The hiring freeze at EMU was
initiated as a "modest measure of
protection" by the university's
president, John Porter, according to
Wayne Douglas, EMU associate vice-
president of administration. Ap-
proximately $1 million will be saved in
salaries and employment benefits by
this action, Douglas said.
Those people under consideration for
the EMU positions can finish inter-
views, Davis said, but no offers can be
made until after November 4, when the
hiring situation can be re-evaluated.
EMU'S DECISION probably was
made because of the revised state
budget announced by Gov. William
Milliken last week, Davis said. "The
legislature has delegated to Milliken
the power to make tax cuts that affect
educatioin," she explained.

If ballot Proposal D-the Tisch
plan-is passed in November, Douglas
predicted, the results could be
disastrous for schools such- as EMU,
Central Michigan University, and
Western Michigan University.

INBRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Reagan, Carter to debate
President Carter and Ronald Reagan agreed yesterday to a one-on-one
debate on Oct. 28, leaving a fading John Anderson odd-man out.
Reagan, apparently concerned that his once-big lead may be slipping
away, said in New York: "I have instructed my debate negotiators to be in
touch with Mr. Carter's staff tomorrow to begin discussing details of format
and sponsorship."
In announcing his decision to meet Carter in the debate sponsored by the
League of Women Voters, Reagan said he still preferred to have Anderson
included, but said he would leave that to Carter.
Carter's campaign chairman, Robert Strauss, said he told the League
the president would accept a debate with his GOP opponent "at any
reasonable time, on any reasonable date, at any reasonable place, under any
reasonable format..."
St. Helens erupts again
VANCOUVER, Wash.-Mount St. Helens blasted two huge clouds of
steam and ash nearly 10 miles into the sky during the night on Thursday and
early yesterday morning. Winds blew the grit as far away as Portland, Ore.,
as the mountain erupted for thefirst time since Aug. 7.
No injuries or damage were reported from either blast Scientists said
yesterday they wouldn't be surprised if the mountain erupted again in the
near future.
Students hurt in
bleacher collapse
EAST LANSING, Mich.-A section of wooden bleachers collapsed yes-
terday as more than 100 student jumped and swayed during a homecoming
pep rally at East Lansing High School. Officials said 22 students and two
teachers were injured.
The most seriously hurt suffered broken arms or legs, and others suf-
fered back injuries or bruises, police said. Most of the students jumped or
slid down the folding seats to safety when the collapse began.
Milliken pleads for funds
for anti-Tisch campaign
LANSING-Gov. Williadm Milliken said yesterday he is making a
personal 11th hour pitch to business leaders for contributions to the finan-
cially strapped campaign for an alternative to the Tisch tax cut amendment.
Milliken and, House Speaker ,Bobby Crim conceded opponents of ballot
proposal D have failed to adequately make their case with the public.
Milliken said he thinks the Tisch tax cut can be stopped, despite its lead in
public opinion polls, but said he is "by no means assured of it."
GNP rises in third quarter
WASHINGTON-The nation's economy grew at a one per cent annual
rate from July through September, the government reported yester-
day-marking an important turn around for the record spring slump.
The rise is the "real" gross national product-which measures the value
of the country's goods and services and is adjusted for inflation-follows a
9.6 percent decline in the second quarter.
High school band poisoned
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. --Baffled health officials and physicians search-
ed yesterday for the cause of an illness that struck nearly two dozen mem-
bers of a high school band simultaneously during a football game.
The entire 140 member Carter High School band was rushed to the
hospital Thursday night after several members fainted after a half-time per-
formance. Twenty-two were admitted and treated with a universal antidote.
An undetermined number of others, who showed symptons, were treated
and released.
The students had consumed soft drinks from a concession stand and
some had eaten candied apples from a convenience store before the game.
The food was tested yesterday.
A week earlier the band had received threats from juvenile gangs
operating ian the guise of high school fraternities.
GM predicts investment will
buoy Michigan's economy
DETROIT-Genral Motors Corp. Chairman-elect Roger Smith said
yesterday Michigan's severely depressed economy will be buoyed by up to
$10 billion in GM investments over the next five years.
Smith, speaking to the Ann Arbor Chamber of Commerce and the Ann
Arbor clapter of the National Association of Accountants, said GM's
average employment in Michigan is down to 220,000 from 280,000 last year,
but there will be a "significant increase" in the work force by this time next

year.
Smith said GM plans extensive renovation of plants in Flint, Warren,
Ypsilanti and Bay City to churn out new front-wheel drive transmissions the
company will need in 1983. Engine plants in Pontiac and Flint are being con-
verted to production of four-cylinder units.
Volume XCI, No.39
Saturday, October 18, 1980
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109.
Subscription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail
outside Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday
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The Michigan Doily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to United Press International.
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a:,

4't

"WHY DO THE HEATHEN RAGE?"
Psalms 2:1 and Acts 4:25

"REMEMBER THE SABBATH DAY, TO KEEP IT HOLY.
SIX DAYS SHALT THOU LABOR, AND DO ALL THY
WORK: BUT THE SEVENTH DAY IS THE SABBATH OF
THE LORD THY GOD: IN IT THOU SHALT NOT DO ANY
WORK, THOU, NOR THY SON, NOR THY DAUGHTER,
THY MANSERVANT, NOR THY MAIDSERVANT, NOR THY
CATTLE, NOR THY STRANGER THAT IS WITHIN THY
GATES: FOR IN SIX DAYS THE LORD MADE HEAVEN
AND EARTH, THE SEA, AND ALL THAT IN THEM IS, AND
RESTED THE SEVENTH DAY: WHEREFORE THE LORD
BLESSED THE SABBATH DAY, AND HALLOWED IT."
"IN IT thou shalt not do any work," nor any rpan or
animal over whom you exercise authority. Probably
nothing reveals the character of a person more than the
commandments he makes, and nothing reveals the
strennth of that charnter more than the manner he

promised the people of the city it would "Remain Forever"
if they quit working on the Sabbath, and hallowed the day:
"Then shall there enter into the gates of this city kings
and princes sitting upon the throne of David, riding in
chariots and on horses, they, and their princes, the men of
Judah, and the inhabitants of Jerusalem: and this city
shall remain forever. - But if ye will not hearken unto Me
to hallow the Sabbath day, and not bear a burden - then
will I kindle a fire in the gates thereof, and it shall devour
the palaces of Jerusalem, and it shall not be quenched."
Quit work, hallow the day, and your city shalt"remain
forever!" Note their reaction: "But they obeyed not,
neither inclined their ear, but made their neck stiff, that
they might not hear, nor receive instruction." The seige of'
the city lasted about a year and a half. The walls were
hr n kpn wn the kinn wna cnntured. and the last thina he

Editor-in-Chief..................... MARK PARRENT
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