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October 05, 1980 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-10-05

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The Michigan Daily-Sunday, Octobe
Two 'U' profs predict

r 5, 1980-Page 3

Carter will win 'squeaker'

w

By NANCY RUCKER
Recent national, polls show Ronald
R'eagan is ahead in the presidential
rice,, but two University political ex-
prts predict President Carter will win.
Center for Political Studies Director
Warr'en Miller said he "will be sur-
prised if Jimmy. Carter isn't reelec-
ted.'
HIS COLLEAGUE and assistant
research scientist at the center,
Michael Traugott, said he "expects
Carter will pull out in the end."
Both men participated in the panel
discussion "Perspectives on the
Presidential Election" Friday during
the University Press Club of Michigan
annual meeting. More than two dozen
members met at the Campus Inn
Friday and yesterday.
Traugott and Miller, who are also
Oniversity political science professors,
*acknowledge it will be a close race.

"Carter will come through with a
squeaker," Miller said..
ONE INDICATION of Carter's poten-
tial victory is something Traugott calls
an "unobtrusive indicator," which is
based on the unemployment rate and
Consumer Price Index. On Friday it
was announced that the September
unemployment rate was 7.5 percent,
the lowest it has been since April.
Traugott said when these figures go
down "and bring the Democrats to vote
for Carter, it hurts Reagan." Carter's
margin of victory will remain the same,
he said, but his probability of winning
increases "as these indications get bet-
ter.'"
Traugott said we are seeing "a
classic example of hardline party cam-
paigns." The Republicans cannot win
the election without support of
Democrats and Independents, he said,
and thus "conversion" forms the basis
of their campaign.

I

H APPENINGS

7

SUNDAY
FILMS

Cinema II-Ikiru, 7, 9 p.m., Aud. A, Angell.
Michigan Theater-A Star Is Born (1955), 8, 10:45 p.m., 603 E. Liberty
St
SPEAKERS
Stearns Lecture/Concert Series -William Malm, "The 'Path' of a
Japanese Drum Lesson," 4 p.m., Stearns.
Campus Chapel-John Feikens, "Christians in Politics," 7 p.m., Cam-
pus Chapel, 1236 Washtenaw Ct.
PERFORMANCES
PTP-"Dancin',"2,8p.m., Power Center.
Canterbury Loft-Benefit concert for the Organizing Committee for
Clericals;7:30 p.m., 332 S. State St.
Anderson for President-Rock & Roll Benefit Concert, 8 p.m., Suds
Factory, Ypsilanti.
HAPPENINGS
Rec. Sports-IM golf tournament, 8 a.m., University golf course.
Awareness through Movement-Workshop, 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Dance
Building.
Hillel-Jewish grad students' trip to cider mill, 10:30 a.m., 1429 Hill St.
WUOM-'"School Desegregation, ' 11:30 a.m.
Hillel-Israeli folk dancing, 1-3 p.m., 1429 Hill St.
Hiking Club-Meet Rackham N.W. entry on E. Huron, 1:30 p.m.
Rec. Sports-Family Sunday Funday, 2-5 p.m., NCRB.
Ark-Annual Sacred Harp Big Sing and Picnic, 2-7 p.m., 1421 Hill St.
Hillel-Deli-Dinner (Kosher, N.Y. style), 6 p.m., 1429 Hill St.
Gay Discussio troup-"The Smart of Loving," a discussion about
sexually transmitted diseases, 6 p.m., Guild House, 802 Monrioe St.
Hillel Musicians-First meeting, 7:30 p.m., 1429 Hill St.
MSA-Voter registration drive, all over campus, various hours.
MONDAY
FILMS
Michigan Theater-A Star Is Born (1955), 4:45, 7:30 p.m., 603 E.
Liberty St.
American Culture-Folklore Film Festival, 7:30-9:30 p.m., MLB 2.
AAFC-Bunny Lake Is Missing, 7 p.m.; Gun Crazy,;9 p.m., Aud. A,
Angell.
Cinema Guild-The Life of Oharu, 7 p.m.; The Devil's Wanton, 9 p.m.,
Lorch Hall.
SPEAKERS
Undergraduate Political Science Association-Brown bag with Kan
Woolmer, member of English Parliament, noon, Main Lobby B, Michigan
Union..
Center for N. Eastern and N. African St'udies-Bag lunch lecture, Ger-
not Windfuhr, "Social Protest in Iranian Literature," noon, Lane Hall Com-
mons.
Communication-Donald Shaw, "Content Analysis in Communication
History," 12:10 p.m., 2040 LSA.
Applied Mechanics-Charles Steele, "Recent Results in Cochlear
Mechanics," 4 p.m., 229 W. Engin.,
Center for N. Eastern and N. African Studies-Hasan Hanafi and Khur-
shid Ahmed, "The Current Islamic Movement," 4 p.m., 200 Lane Hall.
Law School SSSC-Stephen Yokich, "What Is at Stake in 1980 Elec-
tions?," 4 p.m., 132 Hutchins Hall.
CEW-Rita Nicolaida, "Careers for Women in the Sciences," 6-9 p.m.,
Library, 328-330 Thompson.
SACUA-State of the University Address, Harold Shapiro, 8 p.m., Lydia
Mendelssohn Theater; reception following.
MEETINGS
SACUA-Weekly meeting, 1:15 p.m., 4025 Admin. Bldg.
LSA-Faculty meeting, 4:10 p.m., Aud. A, Angell.
Asian American Assn./East Wind-Open meeting, 7 p.m., 4319 Michigan
Union.
Journal of Economics-Open meeting, 7 p.m., 301 Econ.
Christian Science Org.-Open meeting, 7:15 p.m., 3909 Michigan Union.
PERFORMANCES
English-Poetry reading, Michael Harper, 4. p.m., Rackham Amphi-
theater.
University Musical Society-"Barber of Seville," Goldovsky Opera Co.,
8 p.m., Power Center.
MISCELLANEOUS
Planned Parenthood-National Family Sex Education Week Open
House, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., 912 N. Main St.
UAC Mini-Course-Bartending classes, 6 wk. course, 7-9 p.m., 9-11 p.m.,
Union Bar. ,
Lesbian/Gay Male Health Professionals-VD clinic, 7-10 p.m., Univer-
,sity Health Service Emergency Room.
Rec. Sports-IM Ice Hockey managers' meeting, 7p.m., IMSB..
Awareness Through Movement-Workshop, 7-10 p.m., Northside
Presbyterian Church on Broadway.
Dharma Study Group-"Buddhism: The Path of Meditation," 7:30 p.m.,

THE DEMOCRATS, on the other
hand, stress "mobilization" and accen-
tuate party differences. Traugott said
Carter's interest in head-on debates
with Reagan is "to maximize
traditional differences" between the
two major parties.
"More and more, you'll see the
mobilization and conversion themes
played out, particularly in adver-
tising," Traugott said.'
Although many Carter supporters
fear the strength of independent can-
didate John Anderson, Miller doubts
whether Anderson will carry even one
state and believes he will receive less
than seven percent of the vote.
"THE ROLE OF Anderson will be
and has been pretty minimal," said
Miller. As more Republicans turn to
Reagan's "homogenity and ideological
strength," Miller explained, Ander-
son's strength will decline.
See TWO, Page 7
Felines
find fame
at county
cat show
By MARYEM RAFANI
Morris would have been jealous.
Some of the cats at the Mid-Michigan
Cat Fanciers' Cat Show are even more
finicky than he.
The cats weren't saying much
yesterday, but the owners explained
how they'prepared their feline friends
for the weekend competitions at the
Ann Arbor County Fairgrounds.
Apparently, some of the assorted
Tabbies and Tigers are on special diets
and others have their own air-
conditioned rooms.
"EACH CAT HAS its own per-
sonality," said one cat owner. "My cat
wanders around the house talking all
the time."
Approximately 160 cats representing
a wide variety of longhair, shorthair,
exotic and domestic breeds are vying
for honors at the show, which drew
almost 1,000 human spectators yester-
day.
"I enjoy the kittens and the com-
petition involved. If anybody asked why
I did it, I'd probably say it's because
I'm crazy. It's a lot of work," a feline
fan at the show said yesterday..
"I like cats. I like the challenge in-
volved in trying to breed a top
Himalayan (a breed of cat)," said a
woman showing her cats.
"I had to do a lot of self-educating,
reading books, talking to people,
talking to vets," she added.
THE JUDGES have to be in prime
condition, too.
According to Denise Dixon, one of the
show's organizers, each of four judges
rates each cat's eyes, fur, and color ac-
cording to set standards. After the
judges points are tallied first and
second place ribbons are awarded to
the winners.
"There is a whole training process
that the judges have to go through,"
Dixon said. In addition to attending a
judge's training school, all judges are
required to have bred cats and have
won at least one grand championship.
The judges are contracted for each
show from the national Cat Fanciers'
Association.
Cats that are household pets are also

being displayed. These cats are
typically of the "fat and happy" variety
since they are not seeking champion-
ship points.
Proceeds from the show go to Feline
Research at Michigan State University,
Dixon said. "There are still a few
diseases running rampant in cats and
the researchers in Lansing are trying to
find vaccines for them," she said.

I

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