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October 04, 1980 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1980-10-04

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The Michigan Daily-Saturday, October 4, 1980-Page 3
Reagan accuses Carter of politics

in decision on Stealth

Daily Photo by DAVID HARRIS
PROMINENT LOCAL DEMOCRATS kicked off the Carter-Mondale re-election campaign in Washtenaw County yester-
day. From left to right: State Rep. Perry Bullard (D-Ann Arbor); Kathleen O'Reilly, Democratic congressional candi-
date in the 2nd district; George Salladle, an honorary Carter campaign co-chairman; Bob Anderson, Carter campaign
coordinator; and State Sen. EdPierce (D-Ann Arbor).
Local Demoras blast
,Reagan at press meeting

From AP and UPI
Ronald Reagan said yesterday
President Carter's decision to keep a
top aide from testifying before
Congress on a new radar-defying air-
craft shows the president puts his re-
election campaign above national in-
terests.
Reagan made the accusation in a
statement released aboard his airplane
en route to Lynchburg, Va., where he
spoke before a meeting of religious
broadcasters at Liberty Baptist
College.
MEANWHILE yesterday, in a jab a
Reagan and the platform he is running
on, Carter said he will never appoint
judg on the basis of whether they hold
"beliefs on someone's list of so-called
right attitudes."
Speaking to representatives of the
National Association of Women Judges,
Carter said, "As long as I am
President, potential judges will not be
subjected to tests of religion, gender,
race, or personal beliefs on someone's
list of so-called right attitudes."
The Republican Party platform
pledges the party to "work for the ap-
pointment of judges at all levels of the
judiciary who respect traditional
family values and the sanctity of in-
nocent human life."
JOHN ANDERSON, campaigning in
California, compared Carter to Calvin
Coolidge, who he said as a Republican
president of the 1920s showed little con-
cern for the unemployed.
I Reagan said Carter should not have
invoked executive privilege to keep
national security aide David Aaron
from testifying on Capital Hill about
leaks on the "Stealth" aircraft.
However, he would not say how he
would act as president under similar
circumstances.
A HOUSE ARMED Services sub-
committee, investigating how leaks on
the secret project occurred, summoned
Aaron after retired Adm. Elmo Zum-
walt-a Reagan advocate-said he
learned Aaron was the source of the
leaks.
Later in the day, as he arrived at the
Lynchburg airport, Reagan rejected
the notion that God hears the prayers of
Christians only. Reagan was asked if he
agrees with a statement by the Rev.

Jerry Falwell, who said, "We've
traditionally as Christians for 2,000
years believed that we pray through
Jesus' name. That doesn't mean we're
anti-Semitic."
No," Reagan replied. "Since both the
Christian and Judaic religions are
based on the same God, the God of
Moses, I'm quite sure those prayers are
heard. I guess everyone can make his
own interpretation of the Bible. Many
individuals have been making differing
interpretations for a long time."

SENIORSI INTERVIEW NOW
LEARN NOW EASY AND CONVENIENT IT IS
FOR YOU TO INTERVIEW FOR A JOB OR GRADUATE/
PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL ADMISSION.
EVEN IF YOU ARE GRADUATING IN
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IT IS NOT TOO EARLY TO START INTERVIEWING NOW.
YOU ARE INVITED TO LEARN HOW TO TAKE ADVANTAGE
OF THIS OPPORTUNITY BY ATTENDING:
"THE NUTS AND BOLTS OF
ON-CAMPUS INTERVIEWING"
DATE:,OCTOBER 6th and 7th, 1980
TIME: 4:00-5:00 p.m.
PLACE: CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT
3200 STUDENT ACTIVITIES BUILDING
A BRIEFING ON EVER YTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT
RECRUITING AND ON-CAMPUS INTERVIEWING
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aircraft
IN HIS SPEECH to the National
Religious Broadcasters Association,
Reagan said, "I know how much you
respect, and strongly support-as j
do-the separation of church and state.
This is one of our most important
traditions and it must continue to be
protected in the future."
He urged the broadcasters to "share
the responsibility to work for peace .
the peace of the spirit that comes only
through religious values. It is the
bedrock of true peace."

By PAM KRAMER
The world will not be safe if Ronald Reagan is elected
president in November, local Democratic party officials and
candidates insisted yesterday.
0 Local Democrats took pot shots at Reagan's personality
and politics yesterday during a press conference launching
the Washtenaw County Carter-Mondale re-election cam-
paign.
REAGAN'S CAMPAIGN behavior has changed so much
in recent weeks that it's been frightening, said Neil Staebler,
honorary co-chairman of the county's Carter-Mondale re-,
election campaign.
"Reagan's staff has isolated him, keeping him from
talking," Staebler said. "He has put his foot in his mouth so
often.
"He has lived all his# life off scripts and we don't know
who's going to write his scripts in the future," he said of the
WRepublican presidential candidate.
KATHLEEN O'REILLY, the Democratic challenger for*
Rep. Carl Pursell's (R-Plymouth) congressional seat, said
Reagan must be defeated so war can be prevented., She:said.,
she fears that defense-oriented right wing advisors and
legislators would have too much influence in a Reagan ad-
ministration.

Other local Democrats said a vote for independent
presidential candidate John Anderson is a vote for Reagan
and asked backers of Anderson to swing their support to Car-
ter.
"We've got to convince them there's no chance for Ander-
son to win," said county Carter-Mondale campaign coor-
dinator Bob Anderson.
"I VOTED FOR A third party (presidential) candidate in
'68," said State Sen. Edward Pierce (D-Ann Arbor). "I regret
it now." Just as his third party vote in 1968 was a vote for
Richard Nixon, a vote for Anderson is a vote for Reagan in
1980, Pierce said.
The Democrats said they want to schedule a debate bet-
ween themselves and supporters of both Reagan and Ander-
son as part of their local campaign. They also plan to make
their appeal to students at football games, in the dorms, in
the Fishbowl, and at other campus locations.
It is important that the Democratic vote is unified, so that
Reagan can be defeated, siad George Sallade, honorary co-
chairman of the county campaign and former supporter of
one-time presidential candidate Ted Kennedy.
"Make it emphatic-vote Democratic," Sallade exhorted.
The last day to register to vote in the November election is
Monday.

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CONSERVATIVE GROUP ABANDONS OPPOSITION:
McGovern mountin comeback
4g

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PIERRE, S.D. (AP)-The National
Conservative Political Action Commit-
tee is abandoning its effort to defeat
Senator George McGovern in his bid for
re-election amidst indications that
McGovern is mounting a comeback and
concerns from, challenger James Ab-
dnor that the group is hurting his cam-
pa n.
A South Dakota committee leader
says his group will now stay out of the
campaign because polling shows Ab-
dnor, a { four-term Republican
congressman, with a 12-percentage
point lead. "We think it's solid enough
that we're out," said Hal Wick yester-
day. "No more money, no more ads."
HOWEVER, Abdnor forces once
pointed to- a 26-point lead and
McGovern's backers say their own
polling shows the race is a dead heat.
Abdnor himself is trying to put wide
distance between himself and political
action group, saying last week that if
the group tried to re-enter his cam-
paign, "I'd tell them to get the heck
out."
"If you ask me," he continued," when
they (NCPAC) were here, I didn't think
they did a single thing all that effec-
tively. Those ads they ran didn't even
make sense."
Wick heads People For An Alter-
native to McGovern, the committee's
South Dakota off-shoot. In announcing

yesterday that the political action
group was giving up its effort, he
estimated the group has spent $150,000
to defeat McGovern.
GEORGE Cunningham, McGovern's
top campaign strategist, said, "We
think NCPAC feels their negative cam-
paign has backfired on them, and if they
came back in at this point it would have
a negative effect on Abdnor's cam-
paign."
The political action committee is a
nationally funded ultra-conservative
group that is trying to defeat five
Senate Democratic liberals-M-
cGovern, Frank Church of Idaho, John
Culver of Iowa, Birch Bayh of Indiana,
and Alan Cranston of California. The
committee typically runs negative
campaigns, critical of the incumbent
rather than boosting the challenger. It
is this character, and the fact that "out-
siders" are involved, that has prom-
pted critics to predict that the
organizatipn's efforts would eventually
backfire.
In his announcement yesterday, Wick
said a poll of 303 South Dakotans con-
ducted during the last 10 days by
pollster Arthur Finkelstein shows Ab-
dnor with 51 per cent of the vote to 39
per cent for McGovern.
"THIS POLL indicated that
Congressman Abdnor's own efforts
were doing the job," Wick said.

"People For An Alternative to
McGovern therefore believes this race
will be decided by the voters of South
Dakota themselves, which is the way it
should be."
Cunningham said he was glad to see
the committee gone and he laughed off
Wick's claim that Abdnor was running
away with the race.
"We think this is sort of a face-saving
gesture on the part of NCPAC," Cun-
ningham said. "We do not concur in the
Arthur Finkelstein poll."

CUNNINGHAM said, "NCPAC has
been heavily involved in'raising
money" fore GOP' presidential
challenger Ronald Reagan. "According
to the information we have, they don't
have a lot of money to come back into
these states."
Jeff Brockelsby of the McGovern
campaign said, "If the Arthur
Finkelstein poll showed 51 per cent to 39
per cent, that's a very significant
erosion in comparison to their previous
polls that showed a spread which was 26
points."

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pp- AUEIl' N

State Supreme Court
rejects second attack
on Tisch tax proposal

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-HAPPENINGS
FILMS
AAFC-Treasure of the Sierra Madre, 7 p.m.; African Queen, 9:15
p.m., MLB 3.
Alt. Action Films-The Last Picture Show, 7 and 9:20 p.m., Lorch Hall.
Cinema II-The Marriage of Maria Braun, 7 and 9:15 p.m., Angell Aud.
A.
Mediatrics-The Kids Are Alright, 7,9, and11p.m., MLB 4.
PERFORMANCES
Ann Arbor Chamber Orchestra Society-Music of Handel and Hayden,
8:30 p.m., Michigan Theatre.
Ark-Sandor and Laszlo Slomovits, the Gemini, 9 p.m., Ark Cof-
feehouse,1421 Hill St.
PTP-"Dancin'," 8p.m., Power Center.
School of Music-Faculty clarinet/piano recital, 8 p.m., Recital Hall;
Organ Recital, 8 p.m., Studio 2110.
MISCELLANEOUS
Contemporary Fiction Review-accepting submissions for fall, 1980
issue, info. at Angell, Hopwood Rm.
Dance-Awareness Through Movement workshops, 9:30 a.m., School of
Dance.nk
Internatinal Ce~nter-GreenfieldI Vi11sa0pk."Autumn WHarvest

LANSING (UPI)-Ballot posters
explaining the radical Tisch Tax Cut
Amendment need not explain how the
proposal would change the state Con-
stitution, the Michigan Supreme Court
ruled yesterday.
In a 6-1 ruling, the high court over-
turned Ingham County Circuit Court
Judge James Giddings' order that
would have forced officials to print
posters outlining the constitutional
alterations made by the Tisch measure,
Proposal D.
THE COURT, WHICH earlier this
week temporarily set aside Giddings'
ruling pending more thorough con-
sideration, said ballot posters must cite
which articles of the Constitution will
be affected, but not how they would be
changed.
The move was a rejection of the last-
ditch effort by activist attorney Zolton
Ferency to block the 50 percent tax cut
amendment.
Earlier this fall Giddings-at Feren-
cy's request-barred Proposal D from
the ballot, ruling petitions circulated
for the plan were legally defective.
GIDDINGS RULED the signature
sheets failed to list all provisions of the
state Constitution which would be
altered or abolished by the amendment,
authored by Shiawassee Drain Com-
missioner Robert Tisch.
Giddings agreed with Ferency that
Proposal D, by requiring 60 percent
voter approval for new or increased
state taxes, radically changes the
legislature's law-writing powers as well

In its decision, the high court ruled
the ballot posters must only list the por-
tions of the Constitution the backers of
the amendment say it affects-not tell
how they would be changed.
* "The burdens imposed by the election
law have been met," the court ruled.
"The risk that the voter will be con-
fused by over-inclusion and will lose
sight of the provisions being directly af-
fect are at least as great on a
publication posted at the polls as on a
petition."~

J

ST EMERALD CITY.
' f ty c tf tfr it7r kr

oll CHURCH~
PH-ONE 796-2 -117

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