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September 28, 1980 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-09-28

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The Michigan Daily-Sunday, September 28, 1980-Page 5

Pact hailed in

CHICAGO (UPI)-An agreement to
desegregate Chicago's schools could be
n historic breakthrough-provided
nyone knows what it means.
The school principals don't know.
The students don't know.
NEITHER, .IN FACT, do the Chicago
Board of Education or the federal
government, which reached agreement
Wednesday after almost 20 years of
haggling.
Yet it is hailed as the first direct path
toward breaking one of the most rigidly
egregated school systems in the nor-
thern United States,-if not the South.
In technical terms, the Board of
Education entered into a consent
decree with the federal government to
deliver a desegregation plan by next
March and, if it is approved by the
codrt, to implement it in September.
THIS COULD MEAN black young

people will be bused to predominantly
white schools and white students will be
uprooted and bused elsewhere.
The program's focus is likely to be on
magnet schools-the city's best to
which students can transfer-along
with new district boundaries, breaking
down in part a cherished concept of
neighborhood schools. There may well
be some busing.
Millions of dollars in federal aid are
involved but the guts of the decision will
not be revealed until the Chicago school
system faces up to the fact that, of its
460,000 students; about 60 percent are
black and 18.5 percent Latino.
THOSE FIGURES could mean, at the
extreme, that Chicago would have to
try to square its school enrollments
with its own population, Which is
roughly 40 percent black, 20 percent
Latino and the rest white or other.

"It would be kin
try it all at once
Gray of Amundsen
"It would brea
school. Destroy t
heart out of it.
"IF iT WEREe
thing, fine. If it wa
damaging to the ci
kids."
Chicago blackst
some kind of actio
since 1961.
In that time, the
strated and kept t]
in pursuit of go
Chicago school sys
to accommodatet
to satisfy them o
nment.
CONSTANT TI
made to cut off v

Chicago
d of disastrous if they schools unless Chicago shaped up.
e," Principal Martin Drew Davis III, assistant attorney
n High School said. general for civil rights, said, "Chicago
ak the heart of the has become the first major city to see
he school. Tear the that the way to resolve this matter is
not by protracted litigation."
each year, a gradual The National Association for the Ad-
as sudden, it could be vancement of Colored people did not
ommunity and to the see it that way.
"I am at an absolute loss for words to
have been waiting for describe how distressed we are,"
n to be demonstrated NAACP attorney Thomas Atkins said.

"DANCIN' IS AN ELECTRIFYING,
DAZZLING, HEART-STOPPING,
GORGEOUS, SENSATIONAL,
BROADWAY MUSICAL!"
-e eed .w N.Y Daily News

new nIwqu; ur, R.

B

ey have sued, demon-
heir kids out of school
ood educaiton. The
stem has made moves
them, but not enough
)r the federal gover-
HREATS have been
ital federal aid to the

SCHOOL OFFICIALS PREDICT PEACEFUL TRANSITION:

Cleveland initiate

CLEVELAND (AP)-School buses
are set to roll in Cleveland tomorrow
and by the end of the week, officials
say' they will have brought about full-
scale integration in Ohio's largest
school system.
,'All officials involved predict a
peaceful and successful transition from
the partial desegregation in effect for
the past school year.
,LAST YEAR, children in all elemen-
tary, some junior high and a few, high
schools in the 82,000-pupil system were
bused from one part of Cleveland to
another.
Tomorrow, the school system begins
busing about one-third of the more than
4n,000 students to be bused to achieve
integration. By Thursday, full-scale
* implementation is to be complete in the
system where two-thirds of the students
are black.
The city is the most recent to employ
stemwide desegregation. Los
Angeles integrated its public schools
with busing two weeks ago.
iN CLEVELAND, all desegregation
decisions are being made by a court-
appointed administrator, Dr. Donald
Waldrip, rather than by a school board.
Wadrip-the hand-picked choice of
U.S. District Judge Frank Bat-
tisti-took over the desegregation plan,
now in Phase III, on Aug. 15.
Three weeks earlier, Battisti had
found top school officials, including
)Superintendent Peter Carlin, in con-
tempt of his 1978' order to end
segregation of the city's schools. Bat-
"tisti conducted 23 days of contempt
hearings in April and May.
the desegregation of Cleveland

schools has taken longer than expected
because of administrative turmoil,
court orders, and appeals, some of
which are still to be decided.
"IN 1978, when this desegregation
started, there was a great deal of
hostility toward the idea. In 1980, the
issue has shifted to one of eompetence
and whether this school system can run
the district," said Leonard Stevens,
director of the court-created Office of
School Monitoring and Community
Relations.
Police officials say 292 officers will
be also be assigned to monitor the
situation. Cleveland has been free of
violence in earlier integration efforts
and none is expected tomorrow.

s busin
Bus problems twice before hampered
integration efforts, but school transpor-
tation director Richard Knisely says his
department is ready. About 530 buses,
whose drivers have spent a week
making dry runs, will be in operation.
Some pupils will be transported by city
buses, with school vans taking them
from dropoff points to the schools.
KNISELY PREDICTS a 75 per cent
success rate for the first day of school,
with steady improvement in the following
weeks.
Last spring, during Phase II junior
high school desegregation, the success
rate was closer to 25 percent, he said.

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