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September 28, 1980 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-09-28

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The Michigan Daily-Sunday, September 28, 1980-Page 3

Bouncer,
on trial
tomorrow,
for brawl

By MAUREEN FLEMING
A Second Chance bouncer stands trial in
Circuit Court tomorrow for criminal charges
stemming from a fight that broke out between
employees and bar patrons last spring.
Edward Abbott is charged with 'felonious
assault with intent to do great bodily harm less
than murder in connection with the alleged at-
tack against bar patron Roger Nierynck last
March 29.
THE OFFENSE carries a maximum penalty
of 10 years in prison and a $5,000 fine.
The barroom incident began when Vernon
DeJonge was accused by Second Chance em-
ployees of throwing beer mugs into the crowd.
Tom DeJonge, Vernon's brother, said he told the
bouncer to leave his brother atone.
A fistfight followed with Second Chance em-
ployee Daniel Hainsenleder allegedly beating

Tom DeJonge nearly unconscious..
Nierynck said he became involved in the fight
after his friend, Phillip Gosur, went over to
Haisenleder and told him to stop beating DeJonge.
Nierynck said he tried to grab hisfriend so they
could leave to call the police.
BOTH NIERYNCK and Gosur explained in a
pre-trial examination that . they thought
Haisenleder was going to kill DeJonge.
There are several accounts as to what hap-
pened between Nierynck and Abbott that night.
Eyewitness accounts have differed on Nieryn-
ck's conduct toward Abbott.
Nierynck maintains that he never touched Ab-
bott. He said in testimony that Abbott attacked
him for no reason. Nierynck said he just wanted
to get away to call police for help.
NIERYNCK .SAID he was a community ser-
vice officer in training to be a police officer at the

time. He said he wouldn't voluntarily have been
involved in the fight because he said he never
would have been hired if he had a fight on his
personal record.
In the pre-trial examination held about a mon-
th after the incident, Nierynck said he had suf-
fered many injuries from the fight, including
"severe headaches" from a broken eye socket,
paralysis in a facial nerve, dizzieness, damaged
teeth, and a broken septum that he said has
prevented him from breathing from one side of
his nose.
Haisenleder, who faces the same charges as
Abbott for the alleged assault on DeJonge, will
stand trial later this year.
SECOND CHANCE has a stormier history
than most Ann Arbor bars. There have been
numerous complaints filed at both the District
and Circuit Court levels. The greatest percen-

tage of complaints are from patrons irritated
because they allegedly were hurt by employees
of the bar.
Second Chance Manager David Urbaniak cited
several reasons why Second Chance has more
problems than other area bars.
"We have the biggest bar in town. There are
more people coming in here during the week
than any other bar in Ann Arbor," Urbaniak
said.
He said they also have a higher proportion of
non-students. Other bars in Ann Arbor may have
90 percent students where Second Chance has 50
percent, he said.
URBANIAK ADDED that doormen don't have
easy or safe jobs.
"Sometimes the only way to stop a person is to
hit him a little harder than he hits you," Ur-
baniak said.

nmAz

bar

HAPPENINGS
SUNDAY
FILMS
Cinema Guild-East of Eden, 1,3,-7, 9 p.m., Michigan Theater.
Cinema II-Showboat, 7, 9 p.m., Angell Aud. A.
Gargoyle Films-Gone With the Wind, 7 p.m., Nat. Sci. Aud.
Mediatrics-Hair, 7, 9:30 p.m., MLB 4.
MEETINGS
Ann Arbor Gay Discussion Group-meeting, 6 p. m., 802 Monroe St.
Hiking Club-meeting, 1:30 p.m., Rackham N.W. entry on E. Huron.
PERFORMANCES
Ark-"Norman and Nancy Blake,"8 p.m., 1421 Hill.
Canterbury Loft-"Serpent in the Wilderness," 2p.m., 332S. State.
Eclipse Jazz-Ann Arbor Jazz Festival 2, 4 p.m., RC Aud., 8 p.m., Hill
Aud.
Fall Organ Recital Series-Students of Marilyn Mason, 7 p.m., St. Peter's
Episcopal Church, Tecumseh, MI.
Hllel -Israeli Folk Dance,1 p.m.,1429 Hill.
School of Music-Piano Chamber Music, 4 p.m., Recital Hall.
SPEAKERS
First Baptist Church-William Coffin on "A Relevant Faith for the 80s,"
7:30 p.m., 502 E. Huron.
Kelsey Museum-Pam Reister on "A Victorian View of Ancient Rome," 2
p.m.
School of Music-William Malm on "The Secret Art of Japanese Drum
Making," 4 p.m., Stearns Bldg.
MISCELLANEOUS
Ann Arbor Police Department-Auction, 10 a.m., police garage at City
Hall.
Ann Arbor Seventh-day Adveptist Church-Coronary Risk Evaluation
Clinic, 7-11 a.m., 2796 Packard.
Hillel-Deli Dinner, 6 p.m., 1429 Hill.
March of Dimes-Ride-a-thon, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., 121 Huron View Blvd.
Rec. Sports-Family Sunday Funday, 2p.m., NCRB.
Washtenaw County Parks and Recreation-Park Lyndon, "Life on the
North Slope," Car pool leaves Crisler at 9:15 a.m.
MONDAY
FILMS
AAFC-Two Rode Together, 7 p.m., Destry Rides Again, 9 p.m., Angell
Aud. A.
Cinema Guild-Torment, 7, 9 p.m., Lorch Hall Aud.

Black alumni
attend reunion

(Continued from Page 1)
University at the Fourth Annual Black
Graduates Reunion yesterday.
GRADUATES CAME from as far as
Mississippi and Georgia to attend the
reunion. While graduates from as early
as 1938 participated, the largest group
of alums at the party graduated during
the 1960s and 70s.
The alumni, who stayed at Campus
Inn, enjoyed a tailgaterparty before the
Michigan-South Carolina football
game, and a banquet and dance last
night.
DR. CHARLES WRIGHT, chairman
of the board of the Afro-American
Museum in Detroit, and Bob Forman,
executive director of the Alumni
Association, spoke at the banquet which
was emceed by Carmen Harlan of
WDIV-TV..

Interest in the black alumni group
has been growing in recent years, ac-
cording to Sue Ann Burris who helped
organize the reunion.
She said the four-year old association
of black graduates now has a strong
nucleus.
The Black Graduate Alumni
Association started a scholarship
committee this year. The out-of-state
alumni, many of whom are Law and
Medical School graduates, provides
financial support and helps inform
prospective students of what the
University offers minorities, Burris
said.
"The alumni act as a liaison of sorts,
between the University and the studen-
ts," she explained.

Tf6KE THE LE6D
Help New Students or Their Parents
Discover the Diversity of Michigan
BE 6 'SUMMER
OW ENTEITION
LE6qDER
Pick up applications at the
Orientation Office (2530 SAB) or call
764-6290 for further information.
Applications due by Nov. 7, 1980
an affirmative action non-discriminatory employer

//

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MEETINGS

GET YOUR CAREER OFF
TO A FLYING START
+ It takes four years to get a college degree. How long will it
take you to get a good job?
If you haven't settled on a company or corporation yet, why
not get your executive career off to a flying start as a pilot or
navigator in the United States Air Force? It's the finest flight pro-
gram in the world, the pay is excellent, and you'll enjoy the
prestige that goes with the silver wings of an Air Force pilot or
navigator.
It's one of the finest opportunities in the nation, And a great
place to gain executive experience with million dollar respon-
sibility. Find out today about the Air Force flight program. Con-
tact
... Sergeant Paul Wagner, at
973-7703 or stop by 2500 Packard
Rd., Suite 208, Ann Arbor.

American Field Service-Open meeting, 7:30 p.m., International Center.
Christian Science Organization-Open meeting, 7:15 p.m., 3909 Union.
CEW-Brown bag lunch for women returning or considering returning to
school, noon, CEW center.
International Center-Study Abroad Series, noon, Int. Ctr. Rec. Room.
Journal of Economics-Open meeting, 4 p.m., 301 Econ. Bldg.
Minority Association of Allied Health-Mass meeting for prospective
members, 7 p.m., Trotter house.
SACUA-meeting, 1:15 p.m., 4025 Admin. Bldg.
UAC-open house, 12-5 p.m., UAC offices.
University Bike Club-meeting, 7:30 p.m., 1084 East Engin.
SPEAKERS
Center for Near Eastern and North African Studies-Edna Coffin on "The
Image of the Arab in Israeli Fiction," 12:10 p.m., LaneHall Commons.
Center for S. and S.E. Asian Studies-Tilmen Seebass on "Evaluating the
Music Under Louis the Pious and Airlangga," 4:15 p.m., Stearn Bldg., Cady
room.
Dharma Study Group-"Buddhism: The Path of Meditation," 7:30 p.m.,
Room C, Michigan League.
First Baptist Church-William Coffin on "Disarmament, Hostages, and
the Campus,"7:30 p.m., Rackham Auditorium.
Macromolecular Research Center-Guy Berry on "Physical Chemistry
and Rheology of Solutions of Rod-like Polymers," 4 p.m., Room 3005, Chem
Bldg.
National Multiple Sclerosis Society-Dr. Ann Young on "Living with MS,"
7 p.m., Washtenaw United Way Building.
Kathleen O'Reilly, Democratic nominee for Congress will speak at noon
on the diag.
PERFORMANCES
School of Music-Lecture-performance of Chinese folk songs by'Zhou
Guang-Ren, 3:30 p.m., Rackham Assembly Hall.
MISCELLANEOUS
People's Food Co-ops and Nutrition Outreach-benefit vegetarian dinner,
5 p.m., First Methodist Church.
UAC-Auditions for Soundstage Coffeehouse, 1-4 p.m., 2105 Union.
To submit items for the Happenings column, send them in care of: Hap-
penings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St.. Ann Arbor, MI, 48109.

Doily Photo by PAUL ENGSTROM
BLACK BELT KARATE instructor Barbara Christensen and Deborah Webb,
an assistant, participate in a self-defense workshop during the conference,
Women in Graduate School.
Women focus on their

A great way of life.

"
pr oblems i
(Continued from Page 1)
professor jobs going to men.
WOMEN CONTINUE to earn 80
percent of the salaries that men earn
for the same job, Sandler added.
Another speaker, Rosemary Sarri, a
professor in the school of Social Work,
focused primarily on the status of
women faculty members at the
Univesity.
She disclosed that overall, women are
not well represented in the various
faculties, although there were different
patterns for each school or college
within the University.
In the engineering and medical

n.

iacadleima
schools, drawing from primarily male-
dominated fields, Sarri found there had
been no substantial increase in women
f aculty members since 1973.
Female professors in engineering
have grown from one to two, she said,
while in medicine, although the total
faculty has increased from 481 to 537
members, the number of women has
risen from 12 to 13 per cent.
ACCORDING TO the study, the
largest growth in appointments of
women was in the pharmacy school
where women faculty members rose
from 5 per cent in 1973 to 33 per cent this
year.

TIN"1

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EVERY MONDAY NIGHT
National Recording Artists ' * 0
" Video Shows'
- A F
56E .0.ar1 5
516 East Liberty-994-5360

THE
4 PERFECT FERSCPPION

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COUNSELING SERVICES IS NOW
OFFERING THE FOLLOWING COUNSELING GROUPS:
SOCIAL SKILLS: This therapy group for men and women will focus on
difficulties in initiating and maintaining interpersonal relationships. Such tech-
niques as relaxation, assertiveness training and communication skill building
will be used.
WOMEN WITH WEIGHT PROBLEMS: This group combines discussion, insight,
support and some behavior modification to help women deal with weight
problems.
GENERAL THERAPY: Personal problems, particularly thosethat appear in
interpersonal dilemmas, will be addressed in a coed setting.
MINORITY ISSUES: This counseling-therapy group is designed for black men
and women to deal with minority concerns such as self-concept, procrastina-
tion, racism and coping with the realities'of being a black student.

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SUBSCRIPTIOIN

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