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September 26, 1980 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-09-26

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Page 8-Friday, September 26, 1980-The Michigan Daily

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NORMA RAE
(Martin Ritt, 1979)
Based on a true story of one woman's fight against worker
explotiation by a southern textile firm, this moving film tells Norma
Rae's story. SALLY FIELD gives an Academy Award winning per-
formance as the young, divorced mother who teams up with a
Jewish New York union organizer to rally the community behind
them in their fight for justice. With RON LIEBMAN and BEAU
BRIDGES. (114 min.) 7:00 and 9:00
DESTINATION MOON
(Irving Pichel, 1950)
The first film to attempt to accurately depict the physical conditions
present in outer space. The screenplay was co-written by Robert
A. Heinlein, based on his novel, and Heinlein served as technial
advisor. This film is notable for its special effects, which were far
ahead of thdir time. In color. (91 min.) 7;00 ONLY
DEATH RACE 2000
(Paul Bartel, 1976)
A transcontinental race where the winner is determined from
finishing position and points are gained from hitting hapless pedes-
trians. DAVID CARRADINE stars as the disillusioned past champion
challenged by five thug-radicals in this action packed, ultra-
violent satirical film. With SYLVESTER STALLONE; produced by
Roger Corman. (78 mn.) 9:00 ONLY
SHOWBOAT
(James Whale, 1936)
Not to be confused with the fifties MGM remake, this rare oppor-
tunity to view Universal's class "A" treatment of the 'Oscar and
Hammerstein-Jerome Kern musical. Irene Dunn and Alan Jones
play athe young lovers, but the main attractions are Helen Morgan
(one of the greatest "torch singers") recreating her Broadway
triumph as Julie, and Paul Robeson as Joe rendering the definite
version of "Old Man River." (110 min.) 7:00 and 9:00.

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Mosher-Jordan then anc

By PAM KRAMER
When 450 women moved into Mosher-
Jordan Hall in 1930 their dormitory
lives were to be dominated by bed
checks, unwritten dress standards, and
mohair curtains. But that didn't phase
the residents of the University's first
large dormitory for women-Mo-Jo
was as popular among its tenants fifty
years ago as it is today.
"We had a lot of fun then," said Ann
Arbor resident Jenny Campbell of her
stay in Mo-Jo during the 1930s.
"Although that may be hard for kids to
believe today. We had hours, of course,
and we had to sign in and out, but we en-
CASA DOMINICK'S
UPSTAIRS DINING ROOM
at 812 MONROE STREET,
will, in the interest of energy con-
servation, be closed Sundays, Mon-
days, and Tuesdays beginning Sep-
tember 28th.
We will remain op en for
your dining pleasure
Wednesdays through Sat-
urdays', 5:30 pm-9:30 pm.

Hall marks 50th birthday,
former residents relmnisce

MO-JO'S SHAPE becomes apparent
through the scaffolding surrounding
'the construction site in 1930.
now
Local landladies said their livelihood
would be taken away by the construc-
tion of such a large dormitory, but
proponents of the project predicted in-
creasing enrollments would help to
negate that effect.
Then the depression hit. Enrollment
went down instead of up. Dozens of
boarding houses closed, and by 1933
rent in those remaining was as low as
$1.50 per week.
T HE EDITOR OF a Pontiac
newspaper said that Ann'Arbor would 9,
have to "sing its own swan song" and
predicted the city's death if many dor-
ms were built.
Ann Arbor did not die, and 10,093
students lived in dormitories last fall.
According to a Financial Analysis Of-
fice estimate, double room rates in real
dollars are now $122 lower than they
were in 1930.
Today's dorm residents may not go
dancing down on State Street, as Jenny
Campbell remembers she did, and they
may not go in droves to the Parrot to
socialize and drink Coca-Cola.
But some things never change.
Sophomore Kevin Skarritt, now in his
second year at Mo-Jo, feels about it the-
same way his predecessors did. "I-
wouldn't live anywhere else," he said.,

Single Feature $2.00--Doubie'Feature $3.00
Series Tickets-l0 shows-$15.00

joyed it."
Until Madelon Louisa Stockwell Hall
was built in 1940, Mo-Jo-named for two
former deans of women, Eliza Mosher
and Myra Jordan-was the only
residence hall on the "hill."
AFTER THE DORM was made co-ed
in 1968 the sewing rooms were replaced
with a dark room, a weight room, and
an arts and crafts room.
"Mo-Jo is a lot different from when I
was there," said Detroit-area resident
Judith Desenberg, who lived in the
dorm from 1954-55. "Then we still had
hours, still had to keep both feet on the
floor when boys came to visit in the
lounge. There would be huge crowds
outside saying good-night to their dates
when the bell rang five minutes before
we had to be in. t
"I think it's a lot nicer now," she con-
tinued. "The food is better-you have a
choice-and the kids like it here. I think
it's nice to see an older dorm come
back into its own."
DESENBERG'S IDEA of the present-

day Mo-Jo' is probably based on her
freshperson daughter's experiences. "I
love it here," said Lynn. "It's so much
like a house, and the wood is beautiful.
It's just so comfortable."
But this is not to say the dormitory's
history has been totally free of
problems.
Before Mo-Jo's completion most
female students lived with relatives, in
small dorms, or in boarding houses
supervised by the dean of women. The
university saw a definite need for a
large women's dormitory.
This caused state-wide controversy.
"It was probably a contributing factor
in Clarence Cook Little's resignation as
university president," said Ed
Salowitz; director of research and
development for the Student Residen-
ces Housing Division.
MO-JO WAS THE first dorm built
from revenue bond issues rather than
gifts to the university. Critics did not
think the hall could pay for itself in the
estimated 25 years.

Next week:

WR: Mysteries of the Organism
SHANE
The Marriage of Maria Braun
IKIRU (To Live)

Use Daily Classifieds-764-0557

RACKHAM STUDENT GOVERNMENT
" Answers your questions about the University
" Represents graduate students on committees
" Actsas student advocate
" Provides evaluations of dissertation typists

CDBG audit dispute
may head for court

i

2006 Rockham Bldg.
Office hrs.: M-F 8:30 a.m.-12-00 p.m.

7635271

rn nn g

375 N. MAPLE
769-1300

Now Showing
"'WILLIE& PHIL Is
A RADIANT MOVIE
Paul Mazursky hasn't lost his,
sense .of humor or his uncanny
ability to take the most
unfamiliar and give it a twist
that makes it fresh."
- David Ansen, Newsweek
"Kidder's work is the best of her
career and Ontkean and
Sharkey deliver star-making
performances."
- People Magazine

Continued From Page d,
right to audit what he considers to be
"private corporate funds.
"We don't believe it is any of the
city's business," he said. Wheeler said
the agency needed the money to spend
as matching funds for federal dollars,
to purchase equipment, and to insure
the existence of the agency in future
years.
BUT WHEELER admitted the agen-
cy may be guilty of some contract in-.
fractions. "Where it says they must
report all income-that is one place
where the health center may be guilty
of violation," he said.
Councilman David Fisher (R-Fourth
Ward) chastised Democratic coun-
cilmembers for supporting Wheeler's
position. "They're caught in a political
box," he said. "They're always calling
for open government, yet here they are
politicking in favor of a Democratic
mayor.
"This thing could have tremendous
repercussions," Fisher continued. "If
he (Wheeler) doesn't agree to the audit,
he's leaving himself open to all kinds of
accusations."
FISHER SAID it was his understan-
ding that no audits were conducted
while Wheeler was mayor. "It looks
like power-brokering to me," he said.
"Wheeler's wife is the director of the
F LVE ON STAGE!
:DIR ECT
FROM NEW YORK!
"THE MOST EXCITING
MUSICAL ON BROADWAY!"
- Glenne Currie. UPI
"AN ELECTRIFYING,
SENSATIONAL, DAZZLING.
HEART-STOPPING,
GORGEOUS MUSICAL!"
- Rex Reed. N Y Deily News
TONY AWARD
WINNER!
* Best
Choreography

health center and his daughter is head
of legal services."
Councilman Kenneth Latta (D-First
Ward) said he believes the whole issue
is a smokescreen for something else.
"Mayor Belcher and Wheeler ac-
tively dislike each other," he said.
"The 1976 resolution calling for an
audit referred, only to a current
situation-we wanted to audit the per-
formance of an agency "when it was
, being closed out," Latta said. "Mayor
Belcher is trying to use this as a
precedent."
LATTA SAID there is no clause in any
CDBG contract that says an agency
must submit to a city-ordered audit.
"There is a clause that says we want
either reports or audits of a program's
income," he added. "But it didn't ask
for audits exclusively because they
would cost the city a lot of money."
City Attorney Bruce' Laidlaw,
however, said while there is no specific
clause in the city contract, there is a
provision that encompasses applicable
federal regulations and such a clause is
present in the federal rule-book.. /
The city official explained that pen-
ding the result of an investigation into
the agency's revenues, "HUD could
restrict our use of CDBG funds-and
that would hurt everybody." Laidlaw
explained the city would either have to
pay back money to the government or
have funding reduced by an apr
propriate amount.
City officials agree there can be no
action taken on the issue until an
opinion is handed down by HUD
sometime next week.

PAUL MAZURSKY'S

TWENTIETH CENTURY-FOX PRESENTS
"WILLIE & PHIL"

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