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September 26, 1980 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-09-26

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State to miss budget date

The Michigan Daily-Friday. September 26, 1980 -Page 7
* k presents * *

LANSING (UPI)-Bowing to political and fiscal
pressures, lawmakers gave up yesterday on writing
a permanent spending plan in time for the opening of
the 1980-81 fiscal year next week-an almost un-
precedented step.
The move is a serious financial blow for cities and
schools dependent on state aid and will further
damage Michigan's slipping credit rating.
STOPGAP MEASURES WILL be used to keep
government programs going for three months while
budget problems are worked out.
In addition, state Budget Director Gerald Miller
spid the state teacher and public employee pension
funds will be raided to balance the 1980-81 spending
plan.
-ollowing a meeting with legislative leaders, the
governor announced the agreement to draw up he so-
c4lled "continuation" budget. He termed the move

"an unprecedented situation.''
HOUSE LEADERS then held caucuses to outline
the plan.
Legislatures in the past have approved temporary
spending plans for a few days while budget work con-
tinued, but this is the first time a three-month plan
has been attempted.
The governor and top lawmakers have tried for the
past three weeks to reach agreement on ways to raise
$100 million needed to balance the spending plan by
Oct.1.
BUT HOUSE REPUBLICAN Leader William
Bryant refused to support any of the tax hikes in-
cluded in Gov. William Milliken's four-part package.
"There is a general reluctance to move," the
governor said.
He said feat of the radical Tisch Tax Cut Amen-
dment was part of the problem, plus the looming

House elections and the uncertainty of the economy.
BOTH MILLER AND Milliken refused to blame
Bryant for the deadlock.
"There is no single stumbling block," Miller said
dejectedly. "We are disappointed that we will not
have a full year budget."
But Senate Appropriations Vice Chairman Bill
Huffman (D-Madison Heights) later called Bryant
"the Ayatollah of Michigan."
LAWMAKERS HAD APPROVED a spending plan
$200 million over state revenues. Conference com-
mittees were preparing-to trim the budget bills when
Milliken and lawmakers decided to work on a three-
month plan.
The temporary spending plan will be drawn up by
Milliken and Miller. It will essentially continue
present spending levels until the final budget can be
put together.

1

Senator seeks review
of athletic finances
(Continued from Page I)

(

"The
Omelette Shop

STEVE'S LUNCH
1313 SOUTH UNIVERSITY

OPEN:
Ion.-Fri. 8-5
Sat. 8-7
SUN. 9.10

the issue will be moot.
Huffman said he wants to see
detailed reports on "how much more
they've got than they're spending, all
the bank accounts, how much interest
they get from investments, and . . .
'scholarships that don't go to physical
education majors ..
THE ATHLETIC department's
financial statements are public
documents, Shapiro noted. Anyone who
wants =to look at them can. If the
legislature wants more information
than is provided in financial statements
and concise budgets, he said, it can file
a request under the state Freedom of

Information Act, which requires an in-
stitution to release documents such as
budgets.
The athletic department has been
reluctant to release such information in
the past. For example, to obtain a com-
parison of the budgets for men's and
women's sports, The Daily filed a
Freedom of Information request. The
University has indicated it will comply
with the request by today.
Canham was not available for com-
ment yesterday. An athletic depar-
tment spokesman, who asked to remain
anonymous, said, "Don's going to have
to deal with that."

classic Film theatre.
TONIGHT presents TONIGHT
THE BEATLES
in
MAGICAL MYSTERY TOUR
plus CONCERT FOOTAGE,
INTERVIEWS & MORE!
See the pandemonium that was Beatlemania!
MICHIGAN THEATRE, 4,7 & 9
ADMISSION: $2.00
We regret to announce that PERFORMANCE, orig-
inally scheduled for tonight, has been cancelled.

*Students question police
about campus security

stu dent Rebecca Huff, the third un-
solved city murder in recent months.
"Somebody says it's going to take two
wegks (to improve security)-it's going
t itake $2,000. I want to know how many
mpre lives it's going to take?"
Students questioned the officers
about inadequacies of the current
University escort service, which
provides escorts to accompany studen-
ts home after dark, and about the lack
ofofficer visibility on campus.
Heatly explained that his office sim-
0y cannot increase those services at
the present time. "We cannot answer
every escort call-no way," Heatly
spid, adding that women must arrange
fF.j their own transportation if they
need escort service on a regular basis.
"We're spread pretty slim.
"WE'RE MORE OF a reactionary
agency than anything," Heatly said.
"We get involved after the fact."
Dave Foulk, manager of security
services for University housing, said
that, noise is the best deterrent to at-
tack. He suggested women carry com-
mercial siren alarms to discourage at-
tackers and to summon help. "It's
going to take a very determined
assailant to stay (after the siren has
been sounded)," Foulk said.
MANN ARBOR POLICE 'Detective
Dan Branson advised that students
would be wise "to look at the situations
that the victims found themselves in
and try not to put (themselves) in those
types of situations. I think that's much
better than ... carrying a weapon," he
said.
Branson also said he had not noticed
any significant rise in crime in Ann Ar-
bbr, aside from the well-publicized
murders.
After the officials left, the students
diseussed possible strategies to im-
prove campus security. Eventually,

they formed five "action groups" to
research specific topics and report
back to another MSA security meeting
next week.
MSA President Marc Breakstone said
that at the next meeting, after hearing
from the five groups, the MSA task for-
ce will draw up more specific plans for
implementing their proposals.
MSA MEMBER Bruce Brumberg,
coordinator for the task force, said that
the groups will" address five possible
programs to improve campus
security-lighting, increased foot
patrols, improved University escort
service, off-campus transportation ser-
vice and the establishment of a
women's crisis education center.
Specifically, the students tentatively
suggested the creation of both a
revamped, enlarged on-campus escort
program and a small bus service that
would provide to-the-door service for
off-campus residents. The students also
discussed the possibility of better
lighting both on and off-campus, in-
creased security patrol, and the
establishment of a permanent, on-
campus center to provide education
and information about campus security
problems and splutions.
Breakstone asserted that the creation
of several "action groups" to deal with
the problems was not an attempt to
bureaucratize the issue. "We have
people who are seriously committed to
work on these things, and it's not
something that's going to turn into a
bureaucratic summer camp."
SATCHIOUT
W ILLjC",
~WILL CQIE

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