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September 21, 1980 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-09-21

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01

Page 2-Sunday, September 21, 1980-The Michigan Daily
PENTA GON, S TRA TEGIC AIR COMMAND SILENT
Nuclear warhead found in field

(Continued from Page1
"At this particular point, it's
unknown, but no one thinks so at this
point.".
According to Stobaugh, the tran-
smissions said the warhead was
catapulted 300 to 400 feet in the blast
which left a debris-strewn crater 250
feet wide, but was recovered intact.
LT. GEN.LLOYD Leavitt, SAC vice
commander, told reporters at a news
conference yesterday at Little Rock Air
Force Base that the missile was
reduced to bits and pieces.
He flew to Arkansas yesterday mor-
ning and "looked in the hole where for-
merly the missile was."
"We have about the worst case we
could have in terms of a Titan ac-

cident," he said, but said it was impor-
tant that there were no civilian injuries.
LEAVITT REFERRED to the in-
cident as a "catastrophic failure of the
Titan II." He also refused to discuss
whether a warhead was on the missile;
repeatedly turning the question aside.
Leavitt said the Air Force does not
know which of several possibilities
caused the explosion, but said an in-
vestigation board has been empaneled
and has begun its probe.
When questioned about the shattering
of the 740-ton concrete and steel door,
Leavitt said it was easier to destroy
from the inside. The door had been
publicized as being adequate to
withstand all but a direct nuclear hit.
FRIDAY'S EXPLOSION occurred

after a three-pound socket from a
wrench fell 70 feet and ruptured the
aluminum alloy missile, allowing fuel
to escape, Pentagon officials said. The
blast took place nearly eight hours after
the rupture.
The explosion has touched off
renewed congressional concern over
the safety and usefulness of the Titan
II, the largest weapon in the nation's
nuclear arsenal.
MEMBERS OF Congress are asking
if the Titan missile system, built nearly
two decades ago and intended
primarily as a threat to Soviet cities,
has become an outmoded dinosaur that
also poses a threat to Americans.

"IF IT'S NOT safe and effective, I
don't know why you need it," said Sen.
Robert Dole (R-Kan.), who represents
one of the three states which have Titan
missile sites. In addition to Arkansas
and Kansas, Arizona shares the
nation's 54 Titan silos.
Air Force Sgt. David Livingston died
in the explosion.
A spokesman at Baptist Hospital,
where Livingston died, said he was hit
by debris and breathed a toxic substan-
ce. "That was the fatal blow," he said.
Sgt. Jeff Kennedy, the other main-
tenance worker with Livingston, was
reported in critical condition yester-
day.

PUBLIC AUCTION
of
ORIENTAL RUGS
All to be sold for unpaid accounts to our overseas
creditors through First National Bank of Boston;
Ref. No. 323-74544
AUCTION AT:
Holiday Inn/West Bank
2900 Jackson Rd., 1-94 Exit 172 Ann Arbor
Thursday, September 25, 1980
Viewing 7pm Auction 8pm
Our collection includes Kerman, Kashan, Afghan, Princess

141'00

Presidential
Candidates Debate.
Baltimore, Md.
September 21, 1980
BALLOT

Anderson
1 2 3

Reagan
1 2

4 5

3 4 5

- ----
- - -
-- ---
-----

Analysis
Reasoning
Evidence
Organization
Refutation
Presentation

- - -
~ - -

Bokhere, silk, Qum, Ardebit, Afshari and many other rugs in
all sizes and varieties from Pakistan, India, China and Romania.
Sponsor: Oriental Rug Palace of Massachusetts
Auctioneer: A. Adam TERMS: CASH OR CHECK

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Check the column on each item
which, on the following scale, best
describes your evaluation of the
speaker's effectiveness.

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1- Poor
2- Fair
3- Average
4- Excellent
5- Superior

Here-'s how experts
will rate candidates

IN-BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press international reports
Somoza entombed in Miami
MIAMI-Anastasio Somoza, the slain Nicaraguan ex-dictator, was en-
tombed in a Miami cemetery yesterday as thousands of his fellow exiles and
supporters wept and screamed, "Viva Somoza."
A solemn prayer service for Somoza, whose family ruled the Central
American nation for decadeswas held before noon in a chapel at the
Caballero Funeral Home in Miami's Little Havana section.
The 54-year-old Somoza, whose father was assassinated in 1956, was killed
Wednesday in Asuncion, Paraguay. The long-time U.S. ally had initially
sought exile in Miami after his ouster by leftist guerrillas, but he departed
after the Carter administration said it could not guarantee his safety.
Moslem bloc will try to oust
Israel from General Assembly
FEZ, Morocco-Islamic countries decided yesterday to enlist the rest of
the Third World in an attempt to bar Israel from the U.N. General Assembly,
and called for expansion of the Arab boycott of Israel.
Sources stressed that the Islamic countries would make no attempt to oust
Israel from the United Nations, because such a step would be blocked by an
American or British veto in the Security Council.
The veto does not apply to the procedural rules of the General Assembly,
and it was considered possible that the Islamic countries could drum up
enough Third World support to bar Israel from the assembly by rejecting the
Israeli delegation's credentials at the start of each session.
India's largest dam overflows
BHUBANESWAR, India-After six days of uninterrupted rain, flood
waters overflowed India's largest dam, swamped power lines and towns,
and plunged the state of Orissa and its 25 million residents into darkness
yesterday. Local officials said 36 people were killed in the flooding, boosting
the week's death toll to more than 260.
The nationwide flood fatality toll since the start of the annual monsoons
this summer has passed 1,750, according to unofficial reports, and the Flood
Control Division forecast more torrential rain and windstorms lasting
through tomorrow.
The waters submerged high tension lines and knocked out electric power
in the entire state. Officials appealed to adjoining states for power and said
some electricity could be restored today.
Cause of chemical
blast unknown
FITCHBURG, Mass.-About 2,000 people returned home yesterday while
investigators puzzled over the cause of a chemical plant explosion on
Friday, which sent a cloud of poisonous chloride gas into the air.
Two plant workers were seriously hurt, and 16 people were treated for
smoke inhalation in the blast, which damaged several mixing chambers and
a smokestack at the Great American Chemical Corp. plant.
Firemen continued to pour water on one of the mixing chambers yester-
day to keep it cool until the remaining vinyl chloride and polyvinyl chloride
gas could be removed, fire department officials said. The fire marshal,
meanwhile, was expected to spend several days trying to pinpoint the cause
of the blast.
S. Korea continues 'purification'
SEOUL, South Korea-South Korea's new leaders say they will continue
their nationwide "purification" drive, in which thousands already have been
arrested or fired, until-the country regains the sense of honesty and ethics
they say it lost in pursuit of economic success.
But until that happens, they say, there is no place in South Korea for
democracy-as demanded by the United States and other foreign critics.
The military, which took control of the country almost a year ago and.
ruled until former Gen. Chun Doo-hwan was installed as president last mon-
th, promises to play a backstage role in the purification campaign. But it will
remain the most powerful force in South Korea and will make sure the cam-
paign is pursued by civilian leaders, perhaps for a decade or longer.
hIanIraq border fights intensify
Iranian President Abolhassan Bani-Sadr ordered the immediate mobilization of
Iran's armed forces and reservists yesterday for a war against Iraq. A military
communique warned the fighting may spread to the Persian Gulf, where it could in-
peril the flow of oil to the West.
Tehran radio said BaniSadr had taken personal command of the Iranian armed
forces battling Iraqi troops along the western frontier in what it said were "intense"
land and air clashes.

Meanwhile in Tehran, the Parliament announced it would meet again Tuesday
and is expected to resume discussion of the fate of 52 American hostages, who spent
their 322nd day in captivity yesterday.
Volume XCI, No. 16
Sunday, September 21, 1980
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109.
Subscription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail
outside Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday
mornings. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7 by mail outside Ann
Arbor. Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to United Press International.
Pacific News Service. Los Angeles Times Snydicate and Field Newspaper Syndicate.
News room: (313) 764-0552, 76-DAILY; Sports desk: 764-0562; Circulation: 764-0558; Classified advertising:
764-0557; Display advertising: 764-0554; Billing: 764-0550; Composing room: 764-0556.

01

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WASHINGTON (AP)-Want to keep
your own score of tonight's debate bet-
ween Ronald Reagan and John Ander-
son?
You can score the debate yourself,
using the same kind of scorecard used
by the experts, then compare your
results with theirs when they are repor-
ted in tomorrow's newspapers.
The judging panel, consisting of
seven leading university debate
coaches, is using a ballot similar to that
used by the American Forensic
Association for student competition. It
awards one to five points in each of six
categories: analysis, reasoning,
evidence, organization, refutation, and
presentation.
JAMES UNGER, director of foren-
sics at Georgetown University in
Washington, D.C., and one of the
nation's leading coaches of inter-
collegiate debate, prepared the above

ballot and the instructions for its use.
Unger, whose teams have reached
the final round of every major national
debate tournament, is a graduate of
Harvard Law School and will be one of
the panelists.
The other panelists serving on the
debate for The Associated Press in-
clude:
Prof. Barbara O'Connor, Department
of Speech, California State-
Sacramento; Prof. James Copeland,
Director of Forensics, Marquette
University High School, Milwaukee,
Wis.
Prof. Jack Rhodes, Director of
Forensics, University of Utah, Salt
Lake City; Prof. Donn Parson, Director
of Forensics, University of Kansas,
Lawrence; Prof. Melissa Wade, Direc-
tor of Forensics, Emory University,
Atlanta, Ga.; Prof. William Southwor-
th, Director of Forensics, University of
Redlands, Redlands, Calif.

D
:RSITY

973-0770
663-6529
994-0433

At The MICHIGAN THEATRE-1, 3,7, & 9:00
CINEMA GUILD presents (Sunday)
EAST OF EDEN
Starring JAMES DEAN. Steinbeck's story churns up more than Cain and Abel
ever could. Superb acting: direction. A dark and engrossing film of a
family torn apart. Not dimmed after 20 years. All at the Michigan Theatre.
Shows at 1:00, 3:00, 7:00 & 9:00
Monday: TORMENT (Early Bergman)
Tuesday: BUTCH CASSIDY AND THE SUNDANCE KID

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THIS

WEEK AT't1S
MONDAY
PIZZA NIGHT
TU ESDAY
JAM SESSION

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live music, no cover
WEDHESDRA
BOAT NIGHT
THURSDAY
PITCHER NIGHT

Editor-in-Chief.-...-...-..-..........MARK PARRENf-
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University Editor-----------------..TOMAS MIRGA
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HOWARD WITT
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RJ. SMITH
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DENNIS HARVEY

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Sales Coordinr .....E. ANDREW PETERSON

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