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September 17, 1980 - Image 11

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-09-17

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The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, September 17, 1980-Page 11
TWO-GAME STARTER GOES TO COURT

Illinis Wilson

fights for Big

By DAN CONLIN and
DREW SHARP
Illinois quarterback Dave Wilson is
academically ineligible by Big Ten
*tandards and should not be allowed to
play football this season, the Univer-
sity's Big Ten faculty representative
said yesterday.
Political Science Prof. Thomas An-
ton, who also serves on the University's
Board in Control of Intercollegiate
Athletics, said that he and the represen-
tatives from the conference's nine other
institutions concurred that Wilson "did
not meet the required level of course
credit, so he should not be allowed to
play this season:"
WILSON, A THIRD-YEAR player
who recently transferred from Fuller-
ton (Cal.) Junior College, is locked in a
court battle against the Rig Ten to
preserve his eligibility.
"Wilson did not meet our progress-
towards-graduation rule," added An-

ton. "Simply put, he only had 36 credit
hours when he needed 51, and his grade
point average did not met the 1.8
average which the conference requires.
We feel that it is important for athletes
to be students first and then quarter-
backs."
Anton serves as a liason between the
NCAA and the university's athletic
department. He and the nine other
representatives formulate policy in
regards to transfer cases.
THE WILSON SAGA began in
January of this year when he tran-
sfered from Fullerton to Illinois. When
he arrived in Champaign, he submitted
his transfer to the faculty represen-
tative board for approval. He was
denied eligibility for this season
because of poor academic standing, but
was told he could play one more year of
college football next season: Wilson felt
he should be entitled to two more

seasons of eligibility because he suf-
fered a wrist injury on the very first
play of his freshman season and missed
the entire year.
According to Anton, NCAA rules state
that a player uses up one year of
eligibility even if he misses most of one
season due to an injury. He was quick to
point out, however, that the affected
player has the right to petition the
NCAA and the conference for reversal
of the clause. But the NCAA refuses to
accept petitions from junior college
transfers.
In May, Wilson's petition was viewed
by the faculty "representatives and
dismissed because the representatives
felt that he was not "showing progress
in terms of graduating with a
specialized degree."
WILSON AND HIS attorney vowed to
take their case to court on the grounds
that Wilson was being discriminated

against because he attendeda
college instead of a major uni
On August 27, a hearing was
determine whether Wilson sh
allowed to play, and on Septemb
injunction allowing Wilson to pla
team's first two games against
western and Michigan State was
The conference today will begin
peal against the injunction.
"I'm not totally sure abo
legalities in this matter concern
stance on discrimination," said
"He may have a point, but it's
The main issue is whethert
taking an acceptable aca
program at Fullerton. If he w,
then he can't play, although th
are thinking differently.
"I think we have the most st
t academic-progress rule in the c
No other conference has at
one," he said.

Ten eligibility
a junior ANTON'S REMARKS WERE met
versity. with strong criticism by Fullerton's
held to head football coach, Hal Sherbeck.
ould be "As far as we're concerned, there
er 2, an was no problem with Dave's tran-
ay in his script," said Sherbeck. "He had 43
t North- units of credit and a 2.6 grade point
issued. average. He did everything here that he
n an ap- was required to do.
"I definitely do feel that Dave is
out the being cheated by the Big Ten. This is a
ning his kid who has never done anything wrong
I Anton. and was always a good student. Now we
s trival. hear, he isn't good enough for the high
he was and mighty Big Ten. We've had kids go
ademic to Stanford and Alabama. What makes
vas not, the Big Ten and Illinois think they're
e courts any better?"
Illinois faculty representative Bill
ringent Ferguson refused to comment on the
country, situation.

t nton

tougher

... stresses academics

I

PIONEER IN INTRAMURALS
OldTM thVrives

By GREG DeGULIS
Editor's note: This is the first in
a weekly series of articles written by
Daily Sports staff writer Greg
DeGulis on the Department of
Recreational Sports and the in-
tramural facilities at the University
of Michigan.
The next time you enter the Old In-,
tramural Sports Building, instead of
thrusting your student I:D. in the direc-
tion of the checker and then running on-
to the basketball courts, pause for a
second and take a look around.
A quick glance at the impressive
rows of church-like, arched windows
and the nostalgic relics in the lobby tell
you that the Old IM enjoys a unique
niche in Michigan intramural history.
In fact, the Old IM is not only unique
on the Michigan campus, but nation-
wide as well. The Old IM, completed in
1928 at a cost of $743,000, evolved into
the model structure for non-varsity
collegiate atheltics. A Detroit Free
Press article dated July 19, 1928
(presently displayed at Old IM), men-
tions the indoctrination of the Hoover
Street facility.
The Free Press article states "In-
tramural sports at the University of
Michigan will henceforth be housed in
the only building in the country devoted
exclusively to that branch of athletics."
The man most responsible for the
planning of the Intramural Sports
Building was Dr. Elmer Mitchell,
otherwise known as "The Father of In-,
tramurals." Mitchell, a staff member
of the Michigan physical education
department in the late 1920's, pictured a
facility in which large numbers of
students could compete in various
athletic endeavors while enjoying a
pleasantly sociable atmosphere. As any
trip to the Old IM proves, Mitchell's
dream facility in 1928 accomplishes the
same goal in 1980.
The building is a testament to Mit-
chell's foresight. In 1928 the game of
squash belonged mainly to the Eastern
seaboard, yet the Old IM included thir-
teen squash courts, in the original con-
struction. In addition, fourteen han-
dball courts were drawn up in the plans,
and have since turned into the more
popular racquetball/paddleball courts.
As any racquetball enthusiast will at-
test, the quality of the courts has
remained excellent despite the years of

-heavy use. The reason behind the
durability of the racquetball courts lies
in the types of materials used in their
original construction.
The courts have maple walls and
ceilings, a combination which would
cost $120,000 per court to replace today,
according to Director of Intramurals
Earl Edwards. In addition, the basket-
ball floor is made of one-and-a-half in-
ches of solid maple wood-the main
'reason the floor has withstood 51 years
of bouncing basketballs and pounding
hightops.
Despite the large size of the Old IM
Building, the University outgrew the
facilities of the Hoover Street structure.
In 1976, two new intramural buildings
were constructed to relieve the in-
creasing demand for recreational
facilities, one on Central Campus and
one on North Campus.
After 1976, the Department of
Recreational Sports anticipated a drop
in the usage of the Old IM in com-
petition with the newer buildings. As
Associate Director of Recreational
Sports Bill Canning proudly pointed
out, the drop in Old IM Building usage
was 'negligible', further proof that the
Old Intramural Sports Building is still
"The Grand Old Lady of Collegiate In-
tramurals."
During the peak participant months
of January and February in which
almost 8000 people use the four
recreational buildings, 25 percent use
Old IM, which amounts to ap-
proximately 2000 users per day, ad-
ditional statistics proving that the Old
IM thrives.

SPRING 1981
WASHINGTON SEMESTER
The American University
separate programs in
CRIMINAL JUSTICE " URBAN AFFAIRS
NATIONAL GOVERNMENT # FOREIGN POLICY
ECONOMIC POLICY * AMERICAN STUDIES

programs include:
+ SEMINARSWITH DECISION MAKERS
" INTERNSHIPS ON CAPITAL HILL. IN
GOVERNMENT AGENCIES, WITH
PUBLIC INTEREST GROUPS

for further information write:
Washington Semester Programs
Ward Circle Bldg. 216
Washington. D.C. 20016

The American University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action University.

Join
Saff
For anyone interested in joining the Daily's news
stafi, there will be an organizational meeting on
Thursday, September 18 at 7 pm at the Student Publi-
cations Building (behind Betsy Barbour and Helen
Newberry dormitories). Come.see what the Daily is
all about.

Daily Photo by JOHN-HAGEN
tHESE IMPRESSIVE BRICK arches greet many University students in antici-
pation of recreating in the oldest intramural building in the country. Due to
excellent planning, the Old IM still thrives with student jocks every day.
ic gan spikers
outmvolley Oakland,

I olkh,

r

By JOHN KERR
The Michigan volleyball squad star-
ted slowly but recovered in time to
defeat Oakland University last night by
a 13-15, 15-5, 15-7, 15-5 tally. The victory
boosted the undefeated spikers' record
to 2-0.
Coach Sandy Vong wasn't popping
the corks of any champagne bottles,
however. "I'm a little disappointed,"
he said. "We didn't play real well."
Vong attributed Michigan's loss in the
first game to the fact that the
Wolverines took Oakland too lightly.
IN, THE FIRST GAME, the spikers
fell behind early by an 8-2 count. The
Wolverines clawed back from the six-
point deficit until they finally knotted
'the score at 10-10. But with the score
lied at 13-13, Oakland took the next two
'points and the game.
The loss seemed to awaken Michigan,
as it jumped out to an 11-3 lead in the
second game and coasted to a 15-5 vic-
tory.
MICHIGAN AND OAKLAND battled
back and forth in the pivotal third
game, but the Wolverines grabbed the
lead for good at 6-5. They scored nine of
the final 11 points for a 15-7 win.
Michigan never trailed in the final
game, winning that one 15-5.
ACCORDING TO VONG, the women
must improve mentally if they are to
continue their winning ways. "We're
just not mentally tough," the coach ex-
plained. "The other team hits the ball
hard, and that affects us. We've got to
remember that, in volleyball, the hard
spike counts just the same as the soft

tap."
Vong went on to say that the team
must learn to play with the opposition.
He feels that this will come only with
time. "They're young kids and will
learn to adjust to the other team's style
of play as the season goes on.
The Wolverines will be in action
again on Saturday, when they host the
Michigan Invitational. The tournament
takes place at the Central Campus
Recreational Building and will start at
9 a.m.

G Tiea Care's
Rlit GChb

S

BURRITO's AND TACOS at
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Mon.-Thurs. 11:30am-midnight
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Sun. 4:OOpm-9:OOpm

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