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September 09, 1980 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-09-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

a0

The University of Michigan
Department Of Theatre and Drama
in association with The Professional Theatre Program
Guest Artist Series

Page 6-Tuesday, September 9, 1980-The Michigan Daily

Smg Awakening Oct. 22-26
ROmeo And JUfet Dec. 3-7
1Can't Hear The Birds Singing Feb. 11-15
CatSplay April 15-19
usher positions available
sign-up sheets are posted in the
Professional Theatre Program (PTP) Office
Michigan League Building
Hours: 9 am-5 pm

AWARD GIVEN
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (AP)-
The fifth annual Curtis Benjamin
Award was presented recently to Ur-
sula Nordstrom of Harper & Row, a
publishing firm.
The award was established in 1975 to
recognize individulas for their excep-
tional contribution to innovation and
creativity in publishing.
OPEN
AUDITIONS FOR
Sept. 10, 11, 12, at 7 PM
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CENTER
BEHIND THE CHAPEL
331 THOMPSON
Be prepared to give a sample of
your Acting/Singing/Dancing abil-
ity. Performance Nights are Nov.
6, 7, 8, 14, 15.
FOR MORE INFORMATION
CALL 663-0558 or 971-4913
AND ASK FOR FR. BOB KERR

WASHINGTON (AP)-Senate Republicans called yes-
terday for hearings on Carter administration leaks about the
"Stealth" aircraft project.
Minority Leader Howard Baker Jr. (R-Tenn.) took the
lead in urging hearings, saying the disclosures were a
"violation of the public trust" requiring a "thorough over-
sight inquiry" by the Senate.
BAKER WAS JOINED in his appeal by Sen. John Tower
to Texas, the ranking Republican on the Armed Services
Committee, and Sen. John Warner of Virginia, who serves on
a subcommittee that overseas the "Stealth" project.
Stennis (D-Miss.), however, said he was "leaning again-
st" holding hearings for fear of disclosing aspects of the
project that are still secret.
"I don't see how you are going to go into it more without
bringing out this unknown stuff," Stennis said.
Baker said he was disappointed by Stennis' words, but ad'.
ded: "I am a realist. If John Stennis doesn't want hearings,
there won't be hearings."

STEALTH TECHNOLOGY is designed to keep enemy
radar beams from bouncing directly off an airplane and back
down to an antenna on the ground. The objective is to make
the presence of the aircraft harder to detect.
Secretary of Defense Harold Brown and Pentagon
research director William Perry discussed the project in a
nationally televised news conference Aug. 22. In testimony
before a House subcommittee last week. Brown and Perry
said they called the press conference because previous press
disclosures had made it impossible to keep the existence of
the Stealth program secret any longer.
Baker, however, said the previous disclosures occurred
on Aug. 11 and Aug. 14 and no investigation was undertaken
until Aug. 27, the date of the first House subcommittee
hearing on the subject.
"I can only surmise that was no incentive for an in-
vestigation because the Pentagon and the White House not
only knew who was disclosing the information, but had, in
fact, authorized the disclosures," Baker said.
"Why investigate when you already know the answers?"

Senate leaders call for
'Stealth' leak query

"AlU
6E UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
BEST OF
BROADWAY SERIES T
USHER APPLICATION
o Name.
Address
Telephone
~I. You must Choose your series in order of preference.
,2. Return Usher Application to: Usher Best of Broadway Series. Professional
Theatre Program. Michigan league Bldg. Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
3 You will be notified by mail. MUSTINaUDI A STAMPfD. SE ftAOCIf$DEILV1OPM.
Please Number Choice 1, 2, 3, etc.
sertes A.: (Fri. Eve.) Oct. 3, Ott. 31, Jan. 30, Mar. 6
w ...serles B: (Sat. Eve.) Oct. 4, Nov. 1, Jan. 31, Mar. 7
series C: (Sun. Mat.) OctS 5, Nov. 2, Feb. 1. Mar.8
series D: (Sun. Eve.) Oct. 5,Nov. 2, Feb. 1,Mar.
NOTE CURTAIN TIMES:
All1Evenings et 8:00p.m. Matinees at 2 p.m.
ushers Report Sn*.hour before curtain time
Dancin' ...... .................... October 3, 4, 5
Mr. R. & Mr. H. .....-........... Oct. 31, Nov. 1. 2
The Elephant Man ............. Jan. 30, 31, Feb. 1
Mummenschanz .................... March 6, 7, 8 '
_________-

- Woman allegedly attacked near

PUT'EM
AWNAY
JUST FOR
A DAY.
If you can live without
your cigarettes for one
day, you might find you
can live without them
forever. So put 'em away
Just for a day. Thursday,
November 15.
THE GREAT AMERICAN
SMOKEOUT.
American Cancer Society.

Thaye r;
An 18-year-old male faces
ment today on charges of
sexual conduct in the alleged a
a 19-year-old woman about
yesterday afternoon.
The female, a non-U
student, was allegedly grabb
walking down N. Thayer n

police hold suspect
arraign- Street, about two blocks from campus. proximately one-half hour later.
criminal The alleged assailant, also a non- Police apprehended the suspect about
issault of University student, allegedly forced\ 7 p.m. yesterday evening. Several
4 p.m. her into an apartment building with a 6- pieces of evidence, including the hun-
inch hunting knife and sexually ting knife and parts of the victim's
niversity assaulted her, police said. No clothing, were found on the alleged
ed when penetration was reported, and the vic- assailant, police said.
.. «« +i ~^ . He-n^~ ~^'^^~^v Sr n

ear Ann

timI was reieasetu unnarmect ap-

'U' officials to consider new proposal
for late night and early morning buses

- . -

(Continued from Page 1)
hours was made without direct student
input.
Some students also wanted to form a
committee, composed of ad-
ministrators and North Campus
residents, to hammer out the details of
the bus service's proposed rein-
statement.
But Shapiro pointed out that forming
a committee could "delay by about one
month any effective resolution. We
want to be practical and helpful.
"WHAT I'M WILLING to do is give it
(the proposal) serious consideration
... and look at it with an open mind," he
said.
In an interview after the meeting,
Shapiro said, "I think it's better to have
the service, than not have it. The 'coun-
ter suggestion'-one 'Loop' bus-might
be effective."
Shapiro also stressed that University
administrators carefully weighed the
situation, prior to cutting back the
hours.
"The points they (the students)
raised aren't new. We knew we weren't
doing anything trivial (when the
decision was made)," he said.
The administrator said the next step
for University officials was to "look at
The Ann Arbor Film Cooperative
presents $2.00
TUESDAY. SEPT.9
Rock and Roll High School
7:00 and 10:20
New Wave Supershorts
8:40
at AUD. A
Tomorrow: Woody Allen's
MANHATTAN at AUD. A

the outcome of the MSA-University bus
experiment again."
The students appeared to have mixed
emotions about the meeting. While
some labled the discussion "en-
couraging," others were somewhat

Late bus cutbacks
inconvenience riders

6

skeptical of their chances of success.
But the group members also warned
that if their demands were not met,
they would continue to pressure the
administration. They refused to com-
ment on possible courses of action,
however.

(ontinued from Page I)
Some residents of North Campus
have already organized the Bus Protest
Committee. These students, who ap-
pear to have the support of a large
number of Bursley residents, are
presenting their case to University ad-
ministrators, hoping for a reversal of
the bus decision.-
Both Childs and Hallfast said they
were thinking of working for the bus
protest group. Childs also said he plan-
ned to apply for a dorm change, when
the wait lists become available next
Monday.
At 12:16 a.m. the driver finally shut
the doors, and the bus began rumbling
down the street. Childs stared out of the
window, watching the night drift by.
THE NEW BUS SERVICE hours
bother Hallfast, a Baits Eaton House
resident, because they will interfere
with his study schedule. He said he
usually spends two nights a week
studying at the library until 2 a.m. and
"one evening out partying."
Childs also said the new schedule
disrupts his studying. Although he
could use the computers on North Cam-
pus, Childs explained he planned to use
the ones in the Ungergraduate Library
until midnight, so he could work with
friends who live on Central Campus.
Then he expected to study at his frien-
ds' houses before returning to North
Campus.
But even after being told that
libraries on campus are open only until

midnight this year anyway, Childs still
insisted the new bus hours were wrong.
"As soon as people start studying.
more, they'll have to use the libraries.
It's only been (a few) days of classes,"
he pointed out. Childs said he had
studied at the library until 11 p.m. Sun-
day but had left because he had to catch
the bus. .
"THEY (UNIVERSITY ad-
ministrators) could have one bus just
sit here (at the Geddes bus shelter) un-
til 2:15. You don't have to have one'
every 15 minutes," he said.
Childs also doesn't believe University'
administrators' claim that they have no
money to finance the{buses, which cost
$11,000 per year.
He noted that $10,000 was spent
recently to fix University President
Harold Shapiro's football box at
Michigan Stadium. "So they can spend
$11,000 for a bus," he said.
The renovations were financed by in-
terest earned on monetary gifts to the
University. The bus service is paid for
out of the University's general fund.
At 12:26 a.m. the bus stopped at Bur-
sley Hall. A young woman, who gave
her name only as "Sue" stepped off the
bus:
"I don't like the cuts," she said,
trudging slowly towards one of the
dowm's side doors. "On weekends
they're the only transportation I have."
At 12:27 a.m. the North Campus bus
pulled away from the curb, completing
the final run of the night.
4

m

I I

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