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April 17, 1981 - Image 16

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-04-17

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Page 16-Friday, April 17, 1981-The Michigan Daily

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Receivers highlight draft

$100,000 Inventory Clearance !-

Dne

Third Off

publishers' list prices on

By RON POLLACK
Second of a two-part Series
A Daily Sports Analysis
Nowhere will it be more evident that
the forward pass is catching up to the,
running game in college football than in
this year's NFL draft (April 28-29).
Whereas it is a poor year for running
backs, it is a banner draft year for wide
receivers. Although halfbacks George
Rogers and Freeman McNeil are talen-
ted performers, they cannot compare to
the Billy Sims or Earl Campbells of
past drafts.
HALFBACK
1. George Rogers-South Carolina
2. Freeman McNeil-UCLA
3. James Brooks-Auburn
4. Jarvis Redwine-Nebraska
5. Joe Delaney-Northwestern
Louisiana

All Books

*E

Beginning Sat. April 18th
-through Sat. May2d

*
Does not include couse books or
professional reference materials.

incorporates a pass-oriented offense,
McMillan's abilities were often hidden.
Nonetheless, he was. used enough to
show that he is a powerful runner, with
good speed and hands. When healthy,
Wilder has proven to be a top back, but
he has been held back by hamstring and
knee problems which make some doubt
his toughness. Barber is similar to
Wilder in that he was an underachiever
in college. He has size, speed, and
power, yet fell short of his potential'-
because of injuries.
QUARTERBACK
1. Neil Lomax-Portland State
2. Rich Campbell-California
3. Mark Herrmann-Purdue
4. Brad Wright-New Mexico
5. Tom Flick-Washington
There is little doubt that Lomax
should be a top quarterback someday.
The big question is, how long will it take
him to make the adjustment from small
college football to the professional
game? Campbell suffered a knee injury
in November, but this does not take
away from the fact that he is an ex-
cellent all-around passer. Despite his
lack of mobility and an arm that is not
overly strong, Herrmann gets the job
done. He is a great leader and has very
good touch.
TIGHT END
1. Willie Scott-South Carolina
2. Marvin Hickey-Southern
Mississippi
3. Benjie Pryor-Pittsburgh
4. Dave Young-Purdue
5. Clay Brown-Brigham Young
Scott lacks speed but does everything
else well, particularly when it comes to
running over defenders. Hickey can't
overpower opponents like Scott, but he
does possess superb speed for a tight
end. Pryor has all of the tools, yet is
somewhat of an enigma in that he is nQt
team-oriented and has not fully lived up
to expectations. Young has good size
but is downgraded because of his lack
of speed and blocking ability.
WIDE RECEIVER
1. Mardye McDole-Mississippi
State
2. Cris Collinsworth-Florida
3. David Verser-Kansas
4. Mark Nichols-San Jose State
5. Byron Franklin-Auburn
This is an excellent year for wide
receivers. McDole, Collinsworth, and
Verser are almost certain first-round
draft choices, and Nichols might sneak
in as well. Franklin is an intriguing
prospect because of his blazing speed
(4.46 in the 40).
CENTER
1. George Lilja-Michigan
2. Rick Donnalley-North Carolina
3. John Scully-Notre Dame
4. Russ-Grimm-Pittsburgh
5. Lance Pederson-SMU
Lilja is strong and can bury opposing
defenders. However, he does have some
trouble moving laterally. Donnalley

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

PUNTER
Ray Stachowicz-Michigan State
Steve Cox-Arkansas
Steve Streater-North Carolina
David Sims-Clemson
Don Birdsey-Kansas State

has good speed, and he gets good
position on all of his blocks. The big
question mark at the center position is
Scully. He has a tremendous amount of
ability but does not take advantage of
it.
TACKLE
1. Mark May-Pittsburgh
2. Keith Van Horne-USC
3. Brian Holloway--Stanford
4. Howard Richards-Missouri
5. Randy Van Divier-Washington
May is a huge specimen blessed with
exceptional athletic ability. He almost
never lets his man reach the quarter-
back. Van Horne also possesses very
good size, and he does well in all phases
of the game. Holloway is a good
prospect, but two knee operations may
cause some teams to shy away from
him.
GUARD
1. Louis Oubre-Oklahoma
2. Nat Hudson-Georgia
3. Dean Miraldi-Utah
4. Ken Lanier-Florida State
5. Lee Spivey-SMU
Both Oubre and Hudson perform all
types of block well. Miraldi is another
player who has excellent physical at-
tributes, but doesn't play as well as his
talent allows.

.4.

The University Cellar is
open 7days a week in
the Michigan Union,

*

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1

... top halfback
Rogers is a powerful back with the
ability to run over opposing defenders.
He had some problems hanging on to
the football during the season, a fact
which may prevent him from being the
first player taken in the draft. McNeil,
like Rogers, is difficult to knock off his
feet, but both lack breakaway speed.
Brooks is a good deal faster than either
of these two, but at 5'9" and 170 pounds,
he may have difficulty surviving a full
season in the NFL. Redwine and
Delaney are both similar to Brooks in-
that they possess good speed and stand
less than six feet.
FULLBACK
1. Randy McMillan-Pittsburgh
2. James Wilder-Missouri
3. Marion Barber-Minnesota
4. Toussaint Tyler-Washington
5. Clifford Chatman-Central State
(Oklahoma)
While playing for Pittsburgh, which

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DRGINAL SOUNDTRACK
iADA
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Thank you for
Your paronae
Remember us for your
summer sportswear
factory closeouts
2 Blocks off State Street

American League
Detroit 2. Toronto 0
Cleveland 1, Milwaukee 0
National League
Montreal 7, Chicago Cubs 0
St. Louis 5, New York Mets I
Philadelphia 5, Pittsburgh 3
NHL Playoffs
New York Islanders 8, Edmonton 2
(Islanders lead series, 1-0)
Minnesota 4, Buffalo3 (OT)
(North Stars lead series, 1-0)
Philadelphia 4, Calgary 0
(Flyers lead series, 1-0)

Stachowicz
... MSU punter
Stachowicz and Cox are clearly the
best of the punters, both averaging
more than 46 yards per kick.a g
PLACEKICKERS
1. Rex Robinson-Georgia
2. Bill Capace-Florida State
3. Obed Ariri-Clemson
4. Herb Menhardt-Penn State
5. Jim Asmus-Hawaii
Robinson, Capece and Ariri were all
perfect on extra point attempts. In fact,
Robinson did not miss an extra point
during his sophomore, junior, and,
senior campaigns. Robinson connected,
on 22 of 30 field goal attempts. Capece
was 16 for 22 andAriri23 for 30.
SCORES ;81

-. -..~. .1

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THERE'S A REASON NURSES
GET MORE RESPONSIBILITY
IN THE NAVY.
THEY'RE NAVY OFFICERS.
On one side of her collar is the symbol of the Nurse Corps.
On the other is the insignia of a Navy officer.
It makes a difference.
Nw nrq nar e rnAfnihP not only for the care of their

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