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April 17, 1981 - Image 15

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The Michigan Daily, 1981-04-17

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, April 17, 1981-Page 15

Fish Tales

fRE

TIITIE

SAVERS

By MARK FISCHER

Loyalty loss licked Rome...
... major league baseball next

WRITE FOR FREE MAILERS OR ENCLOSE YOUR
FILM OR COLOR NEGATIVES IN ANY ENVELOPE AND
MAIL TO:

OYALTY.
Without it, certain things fall apart.
Over a thousand years ago, the Roman Empire fell
apart largely because it was no longer being defended by
loyal citizens, but rather by paid or enslaved mer-
cenaries who really didn't give a damn.
Given a choice between risking their necks against
bloodthirsty Barbarians or stepping aside to witness the
fall of an empire they really didn't have much to do with
_in the first place, the mercenaries chose the latter. They
would rather switch than fight.
Today, major league baseball is gradually falling
apart as well, largely because many of its players would
rather switch than earn less than one, two, or three hun-
dred thousand dollars a year.
Oh, the sport's doing fine, for now. Attendance figures
have been going up steadily over the last decade, in fact.
Then again, the fat hedonists in Rome were also doing
fine, gorging themselves with sex, food and booze (not
necessarily in that order) until the end, as well.
But sooner or later, the fans aren't going to waste
either their time or shrinking dollars supporting teams
which change radically in personnel from year to year.
For it has come to the point wheretmoney seems to be
the single most important criterion to a player - much
more important than returning the loyalty, the devotion
even, of a team's fans by staying with that team and
trying to help it to a championship.
Because of this, it's becoming harder and harder to be
a fan. How can you continue to be loyal to a team whose
players don't seem to know you exist the minute a little
long green is flashed before their eyes?

Take ie, for instance. Having lived in the heart of
Boston for the last eight years, I'm aRed Sox-fan - or at
least I was. Over the winter, however, as I saw players
like Fred Lynn, Carlton Fisk, and Rick Burleson leave
for greener pastures, I became disheartened - with
those players, with the Sox, and with baseball in general.
I mean, those guys were my heroes, my demigods. I
stood behind them and cheered their every move ever
'since they came into the league, not just because they
were talented, once-classy ballplayers, but-because they
were Red Sdx. They represented my town, and every year
the town and I felt closer to them for it.
But then they took off, just like that, without even a
word of "Thanks" or "I'm sorry" to the fans who had
supported them like loving parents support their
children. It's like a slap in the face.
Sure, we've still got big Jim Ed Rice, a demigod in his
own right. But how can we give of ourselves as fans to
him and the rest of the Sox when we potentially face the
same kind of thankless rejection when their contracts
run out?
Some people, including Marvin Miller and the rest of
the Players' Association, argue that the players - who
may go on strike May 28 - are people, too; they have as
much right as anyone else to grab all they can.pThat
argument would stand fine with me if the players
weren't grabbing at the expense of the fans. Who is the
game played for, anyway? A smattering of selfish in-
dividuals (including the owners), or all of America's
people?
After all, it is "America's sport," isn't it? Perhaps it
won't be for long. Perhaps the time will come when it
will be the fans, not players, who go on strike:

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-------------------------------------------------- --------------------------------

SPOR TS OF THE DAILY:
'M' netters roll, 9-0

Special to the Daily
EAST LANSING - The Michigan
men's tennis team raised its record to
11-4 yesterday with a 9-0 whitewash of
Michigan State. The netters were
without the services of All-American
Matt Horwitch, suffering from an ankle
injury.
s First singles player Michael Leach
won his 15th straight match, defeating
MSU's Matt Sandler, 6-3, 4-6, 6-4. It was
one of the few matches this year in
which Leach has been extended to three
sets before finishing off his opponent.
MARK MEES BREEZED past the
Spartans' Scott King, t6-2; 6-1, at ruri
ber two, while Ross Laser defeated
Steve Yorimoto at third singles, 7-5, 6-1.
At fourth singles, Tom Haney, and fif-
th singles player Ihor Debryn had easy
times disposing of their respective MSU
opponents. Haney dumped Jordy
Asher, 6-2, 6-4, while Debryn beat Jeff
Wickman, 6-3,6-2.
Rodd Schreiber made his debut at
sixth singles and won a hard-fought
three-set match. Schreiber defeated
Francisco Amaya, 6-1, 4-6, 7-5.
LEACH TEAMED WITH Debryn,
rather than his usual partner Horwitch,
to down Sandler and King, 6-2, 6-4, at
first doubles. Haney and Laser topped
Yorimoto and Amaya, 6-4, 6-1, while
Mees and Dan McLaughlin completed
the rout with a 6-2, 6-2 win over Wick-
roan and John LaParl.
Horwitch suffered his ankle sprain
earlier this year, before Michigan's
:match against Florida State. The injury
flared up again yesterday, so coach
Brian Eisner "decided to keep him
Qut."
The victory was Michigan's 27th con-
secutive Big Ten win and raised its con-
"f erence record for the season to 5-0. The
-netters next play on Monday, when they
face Miami of Ohio on the varsity tennis
courts outside of the Track and Tennis
Building.
Un-Bear-able law
MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) - A bill
clearing the way for University of
Alabama football Coach Paul "Bear"
Bryan to continue coaching beyond the
mandatory state retirement age of 70
was passed yesterday by the Alabama
Senate.
IM SCORES
WEDNESDAY
Volleyball
Number of Games Won
Co-Recreational
Class A Playoffs
CoRection 2, D.I.R.T. 0
h e S Class B Playoffs
Shootzie Scores 2, Thieme Machine 0

Some senators questioned if the bill,
which now goes to the House, would
allow University of Alabama trustees to
exempt any employee from the man-
datory retirement law. But sponsors of
the measure said it was intended to ap-
ply only to Bryant, who will be 68 this
September.
STATE SEN. Ted Little of Auburn
asked if one of the bill's advocates,,
state Sen. Ryan deGraffenried of
Tuscaloosa, would support legislation
giving similar exemptions to other
coaches around the state.
DeGraffenried replied that he would
"if they win 300 football games and win
the national championship four or five
times."
Louis mourned
LAS VEGAS, Nev. (AP)-Hundreds
of mourners began filing past Joe
Louis' coffin yesterday to pay their
final respects to the former
heavyweight boxing champion who
helped raise American spirits during
the dark days of World War II.
Louis, lying in an open casket inside a
boxing ring in the sports pavillion at
Caesars Palace, will be buried at
Arlington National Cemetery on
Tuesday by order of President keagan.
Some walked quickly by the open
casket; others paused, gazing at the
Brown Bomber. Some wiped their eyes
as they passed by.
The public was able to view Louis'
body all day.
Among the pallbearers at the
memorial service, where the eulogy
will be delivered by the Rev. Jesse
Jackson, will be World Boxing Council
heavyweight champion Larry Holmes,
former world heavyweightnchampion
Muhammad Ali, entertainer Frank
Sinatra, boxing promoter Don King,
Caesars Palace president Harry Wald
and family friends, William S. Wein-
berger Sr., Abe Margulies and Ben
Rogers.
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Which beer tasted better?

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An impossible question?
No. The answer is, the beer on the right tasted better. The suds are
the tipoff. The head lacing the glass on the right has what brewers
call "cling" Its tendency to cling to the glass tells - _
you that the brewer didn't skimp on the
hops. And that'it tasted better.

<es
Did your choice surprise you?
Something like 2 out of 3 beer drinkers don't pick their brand.
And that surprises them. A lot of them pick Schlitz instead.
That doesn't surprise us. Two years 4go a master brewer, Frank
Sellinger, came to Schlitz. Today he is the Chief Executive Officer
and today's Schlitz is the smoothest beer he's ever brewed. Taste it
against yours.The results may surprise you.
The best beer is # -_-

'

Ever taste a beer with no "hop" to it?
Iops give a beer its zing. Too little hops
leaves a beer lifeless. Too much hops
makes a beer bite.
But choose a beer with the right
proportion of hops to barley malt, and
your beer will be lively and refreshing.
Yet, still go down nice and smooth.

^ I I'EF
I' p it
.
/'
a
.

-y 4.l

RefreshingI

Faintly
sweet

Full
bodied

Smooth

MellowI

Mild

Full
flavored

t.

N

e 4~1r R O

-r
J

e

Does your beer have "cling?"
To check for "cling' you need a glass that's "beer clean:' (Never used
for milk or soft drinks, never washed in soap*)
Pour your beer down the center of the glass to form a 3/4 inch
head. See if it leaves rings of foam as you drink. But don't stop at the
"cling" test. Make this a full-fledged taste test.
*Not(4: "Beer-c leat" glasses sit) uldl it' washed with detergetit. Rinse several timest)t it eryh tot
Can you recognize your beer by the taste?
Probably just 1 beer drinker in 3 can pick his beer
out of a group of three.You try. Pour your brand and

10
9-
-
2
-1

Flat

Too
bitter

Watery

Biting

Too
strong

Overly
carbonated

Bland

- I - ~ - i - i - I - i

Place beers' numbers on each scale from 1 to 10.
Beer #1 is
Beer #2 is
Beer #3 is

t s

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