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April 17, 1981 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-04-17

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'Tis the season for

The Michigan Daily-Friday, April 17, 1981-Page 3
romance,

sublets... and bouncing checks

By KATHY ROUBEKAS
Although tracking down bad checks is an expensive
hassle all year round for local merchants, spring
seems the season for an especially acute rash of
check-bouncing.
Many store-owners complain that checks bouncing
off recently-closed accounts come April as students
pack up and head for home are a perennial problem.
CHECK BOUNCING "is one of the worst problems
because 90 percent of it deals with parents' money, so
the students just don't care," said Village Corners
check manager Sara Wood.
However, Jim Leonard, Discount Records
manager, said, "Students are not the biggest check
bouncers. It's the people who have zodiac signs on
their checks and people who don't have 'real' first
names."
Schoolkids Records manager Michael Lang
agreed, saying, "Bad check writers are usually not

students. They are people who do it as a second
profession."
WHOEVER THE offender is, bounced checks cost
Ann Arbor merchants big money: University Cellar
manager John Sappington said the bookstore wrote
off $16,000 in bad checks last year, and expects to
write off $18,000 in 1981.
As preventive measures, many clerks and
salespeople ask for a picture ID (preferably a drivers
license), and a currently valid student ID. A check
unaccompanied with validated ID must be written
from a local bank with the customers local address
and telephone number on it.
Once a check has gone bad, the "bouncer" may
have to dole out an additional $5 to the store as well as
the usual $7 or $8 fee required by many banks.
IF THE MERCHANTS fail to get their money, they
can choose to utilize check reclaiming services and
even take the offender to court.w.

For checks written for under $50, -a convicted of-
fender could be sentenced to a maximum of 90 days inw
jail and/or a $100 fine.
For three bad checks written in 10 ,days, the
maximum sentence is two years in jail. Writing
checks without an account is a felony, and the
maximum sentence is also two years.
ALMOST ALL merchants recently surveyed keep
"bad check" lists. If a person's name is on such a list,
he or she may never cash a check at that particular
store again.
If they don't have any problems collecting the
money, the majority of store-owners will erase the
customer's name, but a few maintain a permanent
list.
"Some people view bouncing checks as some sort of
outstanding loan," Schoolkids manager Lang said.
"We don't prefer to deal with people like that."

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Late night
P ackard
blaze
hurts two
students

.................. -------- -------------

AP Photo
ASTRONAUT ROBERT CRIPPEN takes advantage of zero gravity to do
some acrobatics aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia while in Earth orbit.
The photo was taken by fellow astronaut John Young.
Space shuttle a
glowig success

By ANN MARIE FAZIO
Fire gutted a two-bedroom apartment at 526 Packard Rd.
early yesterday morning. Firefighters battled for nearly two
hours before extinguishing the blaze at 4:15 a.m., according
to Deputy Fire Marshall Ben Zahn.
The top floor apartment of the 21%-story building was vir-
tually destroyed, Fire Inspector Lee Larson said.
FOUR UNIVERSITY students who lived in the apartment
were apparently sleeping when the fire started in the living
room.
The fire department is still investigating the cause of the
fire, but arson is not suspected, Zahn said.
Larson said the fire department is investigating the
possibility of an electrical problem.
The management of the nine-unit apartment building,

Modern Management, has made temporary living
arrangements for the four women residents, according to one
resident, LSA junior Nancy Stoll.
STOLL, AND ROOMMATE Michele Richards, an LSA
sophomore, escaped the blaze unharmed. LSA sophomore
Monica Andonian injured her ankle when she jumped from
the apartment balcony. Linda Costini, also an LSA
sophomore, burned her hand and wrist on the front door han-
dle when she tried to open it.
Nearly all the personal property in the apartment was
damaged, according to Stoll.
Red Cross official Richard Smoot said his organization
assisted the women by giving them money for food and uten-
sils.

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Rad*ock accepts a dminist
I rative job at USC

From UPI and AP
HOUSTON - Space shuttle
astronauts John Young and Robert
Crippen, returning to regular hours af-
ter years of 12- to 18-hour training days,
yesterday began preparing pilot repor-
ts on the maiden flight of the Columbia.
"After three years of training for this
thing, it's a big change in their lifestyle
to work 8 to 5 and be off weekends,"
Johnson Space Center spokesman John
Lawrence said.
LAWRENCE SAID re-examiniation
of flight data and assessments of the
astronauts' experience so far
bolstered the judgement that the flight
was a complete success.
"It continues to look awfully good,"
Lawrence said.
In fact, the space agency is seriously
considering accelerating the space
shuttle project. because of the pilots'
glowing reports, officials reported
yesterday.
THE SPACE AGENCY would like, if
possible, to eliminate one of Columbia's
three remaining test missions, which
could advance by several months the
day when the winged ship can begin

operations as a space-faring cargo ship,
moving routinely and repeatedly bet-
ween Earth and orbit.
Officials at the Johnson Space Center
said a decision whether to cut one of the
test flights may not be made until after
Columbia's second trip - set for
August or September. They said the
initial debriefing of the astronauts who
flew the first test has been very en-
couraging.
Astronauts John Young and Robert
Crippen met for a second day yesterday
with technical experts to discuss in
detail the operation of the ship's
steering jets, electronics, computers,
and other systems during the 2 -day
flight that ended Tuesday with a pin-
point landing on a desert runway at
Edwards Air Force base in California.
COLUMBIA IS THE first craft to
return to Earth like an airliner, and is
scheduled to be used again, perhaps 100
or more times.
The present schedule calls for
Columbia to become operational in Sep-
tember, 1982, with a communications
satellite as its first commercial
ayload.

Michael Radock, vice president for
University relations and development,
was named yesterday to a high ad-
ministrative job at the University of
Southern California. He will assume the
new post in late June.
As senior vice president for develop-
ment and university relations at USC,
Radock will be responsible for fund
raising, public affairs, and almuni
relations.
The 63-year-old vice president's ap-

pointment was announced by USC
President James Zumberge, a geology
professor at the University of Michigan
from 1950 to 1962.
RADOCK, WHOSE NEW post will be
similar to the one he currently holds,
announced in early February that he
would retire as a University vice
president at the end of 1981. He has been
the University's chief fundraiser and
public relations official since 1961.
"Michael Radock is one of the most

highly regarded professionals in the
field of higher education today. His
record of accomplishments and con-
tributions is simply superb," said
USC's Zumberge. "We are indeed-for-
tunate and privileged to have him join
the new administrative team at USC as
the university begins its second cen-
tury."
THE APPOINTMENT marks the
second of three senior positions to be
filled at USC since Zumberge first an-

nounced plans last December to
reorganize the central administration
at USC. Jon Strauss of the University of
Pennsylvania was appointed senior
vice president for administration on
March 30.
Radock, Strauss, and a still-to-be
named senior vice president for
academic affairs, together with Zum-
berge, will constitute an executive
committee of the university.

Prisoner's death may
spur German riots

From UPI and AP
BONN, West Germany - Twenty-five
West German terrorists .ended a two-
month hunger strike yesterday,
signaling an end to weeks of violence by
their supporters. The fast ended
several hours after 38-year-old Sigurd
Debus, the first of the strikers, died of
kstarvation in a Hamburg hospital.
A lawyer for the terrorists said of-
ficials met the prisoners' demand to
meet in groups and promised none
would be held in isolation. The
terrorists, who had been pressing for
recognition as political prisoners, were
held in single cells in jails across West
Germany.
Government officials withheld im-
mediate comment on possible changes
in the conditions of imprisonment.
Police in Stuttgart, who had prepared
for the possibility of riots following
Debus' death, announced that a rally in
support of the hunger strikers was
called off.
Mayor Hans-Jochen Vogel of Berlin,
where a premature rumor of Deubs'
death sparked a riot Sunday in which
stores and banks were smashed, war-
ned against more violence and ap-
pealed to all to keep the peace.
"Violence destroys, it can't change
things or make anything any better,"
Vogel told a news conference. "We
cannot allow the state, we cannot allow
our city, to be oppressed by violence."
Debus' death has sparked fears of a
leftist terror campaign timed to hit U.S.
military installations in West Germany
over the Easter weekend.

Just before authorities in Hamburg
announced the death of Debus, a home-
made time bomb was found hanging by
a rope in the U.S. Army community
headquarters in Wiesbaden.
The bomb squad defused the device
- a fire extinguisher packed with 8.
pounds of explosives - after hundreds
of Americans were evacuated from the
building, which houses the military
comand in Wiesbaden and a children's
nursery.
An Army spokesman said a document
was found nearby declaring, "Death
to Yankee imperialism," urging
"fulfillment of the hunger strike
demands" and calling for support of the
Red Army Faction terror gang founded
by Andreas Baader and Ulrike
Meinhof.
The movement founded by Baader
and Miss Meinhof, both prison suicides,
grew out of the student rebellion in the
late 1960s, and was augmented by
radicals disappointed by futile univer-
sity revolts.
$n of Bamboo Presents

TIMIPF UESKEISTSU

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