100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 17, 1981 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-04-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

10

Page 2-Friday, April 17, 1981-The Michigan Daily

Regents

(JIurrI UiLIip EtCUIE0 hear

IN BRIEF*
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
120 S.State St.
(Corner of State and Huron)
Worship Schedule:
8:30 . a.m.-Holy Communion in the
Chapel.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Morning Wor-
ship in the Sanctuary. .
Sermon for April 19: "Resurrection
Now" by Dr. Donald B. Stobe.
Church School for all ages-9:30 a.m.
and 11.a.m.
Choir Rehearsal-Thursday at 7:15
p.m.
Ministers:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Rev. Fred B. Maitland
Dr. Gerald R. Parker
Education Directors: Rose McLean
and Carol Bennington
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Pastor, Jitsu Morikawa
10:00 a.m.-"They Have Taken Away
The Lord."
7:00 p.m. Lenten Service.
11:00 a.m.-Sunday School (for all
ages).
American Baptist Campus
Foundation
All students and faculty are invited to
attend worship service at 10 a.m. in the
sanctuary and Sunday School Classes
at 11 a.m. in the Guild House.
TheologyDiscussion Group every
Thursday at 6 p.m.
(Complimentary brunch on second
Sunday of each month.)

ST. MARY'S CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557 +
Weekly Masses:
Sat.-7:00 p.m.
Sun.-7:30 a.m., 9:00 a.m., 10:30 a.m.
(after 10:30 upstairs and downstairs).
12:00 noon, 5:00 p.m. (upstairs and
downstairs)
North Campus Mass at 9:30 a.m. in
Bursley Hall (Fall and Winter Terms).
Rite of Reconciliation-4 p.m.-5 p.m.
on Friday only; any other time by ap-
pointment.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.-662-4466
(between S. University and Hill)
Campus Ministry Program
Campus Minister-Carl Badger
COLLEGE STUDENTS FELLOWSHIP
Activities: Sunday morning coffee
hour in between Services in French
Room.
Worship Service-Sunday, 9:30 a.m.
and 11 a.m.
College Student Fellowship at 4:00
p.m. in the French Room.
p.m. in the French Room.
* * *
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
A Campus Ministry of the Christian
Reformed Church
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
10:00 a.m.-Easter Sunday.
6:00 p.m.-Service of Holy Com-
munion.
Wednesday: 10:00 p.m. Evening
Prayers.

LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(The Campus Ministry of the ALC-
LCA)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
Sunday Worship Service at 10:30
Sunday 19-9:00 am Easter Break-
fast.
Sunday 19-10:30 am Easter
Celebration with Communion.
Wednesday 7:00 p.m. Choir Practice
Thurs. 12-1 p.m. "Squaretable" lunch
at L.O .
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
Serving the Campus for LC-MS
Robert Kavasch, Pastor
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
663-5560 -
Sunday Worship: 9:15 a.m. and 10:30
a.m.
Maunday Thursday 7:30 Worship..
Good Friday 7:30.
Tenebrae Service 7:30.
Easter Breakfast 9 a.m.
Worship Festival 10:30 a.m.
* * *
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF THE NAZARENE
409 South Division
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Rev. Steve Bringardner, 761-5941
Christian Education-9:45 a.m.
Service of Worship-11:00 a.m.
Thursday April 16-Passover Seder,
7:00 p.m.
Musical "Celebrate Life" 6:00p.m.
- * * *-
CHURCH OF SCIENTOLOGY
Huron Valley Mission
301 North Ingalls
(two blocks north of Rackham
Graduate School)
668-6113
Sunday Service-2:30 p.m.
Rev. Marian K. Kuhns
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
OF ANN ARBOR
1917 Washtenaw (corner of Berkshire)
Sunday Services at 10:30 A.m.
Coffee Hour and conversation after
services.
Child Care available
Kenneth W. Phifer-Minister 665-6158

A unimau nnnrtunitv to cover Israel and the Middle East!

June 23-July 29, 1951
Students will be offered the use of the city room and ar-
chives of the Jerusalem Post. They will be required to
submit stories for the media abroad.
. Professional training . Field Trips - Supervised writ-
ing. . Academic courses: The Middle East, the Arab-
Israel dispute, the peace process, oil politics, Palestinian
*nationalism, Israeli history, politics and society.
Write or call:
Office of Academic Affairs
AMERICAN FRIENDS OF THE HEBREW UNIVERSITY
1140 Avenue of the Americas New York, N. Y. 10036
Tel: (212) 840-5820 / 840-5824
Registration deadline: May 1, 1981

'N

1.

a

YOU'RE ONE. YOU'RE IN.
G(DD COMPANY

tuition
arguments
(Continued from Page 1)
nearer to 11 percent comes down to "A
question of paying $100 more (for in-
state students) for the University of
Michigan or saving the $100 for just
going to another state school."
Regent Deane Baker (R-Ann Arbor)
said he would like the administration to
look into the possibility of deferring
some capital projects next year and
keeping tuition hikes down in hopes that
the state's economy will turn around to
better support the University.
But Regent Gerald Dunn (D-Lansing)
said he is not as optimistic about the
state's ability to cure the University's
ills.
Adding to the Regents worries about
tuition increases is the prospect of
severe cuts in financial aid, as proposed
by the Reagan administration.
The chairman of the Committee on
the Economic Status of the Faculty also
reported to the Regents yesterday the
"deterioration in faculty real income is
causing serious damage to faculty
morale."
Economics Prof. Ronald Teigen said
the committee was aware of the dif-
ficult situation faced by the Univer-
sity's budget planners, but felt faculty
salaries "should be given highest
priority."
The committee, which reported
faculty members have experienced a
decline in real income of more than 22
percent since 1972, said a "salary
program adequate to maintain faculty
income at its 1980-81 level . . . is the
minimum that we can view as accep-
table."
An 11.6 percent increase would be
necessary to keep up with the consumer
price index, Teigen said.
But even if the University receives its
full appropriation increase of 12 per-
cent this year, tuition would have to
balloon 17 percent to give faculty mem-
bers an 11 percent increase, according
to Frye's figures.
And such an increase from the state
stands little chance of fruition, Frye
warned.
In other action, the Regents approved
a $70 a day increase in hospital room
rates to be fully implemented by
November. Such action was necessary
to adequately increased salaries, keep
up with supply costs, improve patient
care services, and set aside funds for
capital requirements over the next
decade, according to hospital ad-
ministrators.
Today, the Regents will act on the
appointments of Rhetaugh Dumas,
deputy director of the National.Institute
of Mental Health, as Nursing School
Dean and University economics Prof.
Peter Steiner as LSA Dean. The Regen-
ts are also expected to act on a Health
Service proposal to increase its rates 40
percent while decreasing the number of
services for which students will have to
pay.
'WHY DO THE
HEATHEN RAGE?'
Psalm 2: 1 and Acts 4:25
THEY CRUCIFIED HIM-LUKE 23
33 And when they were come to
the place, which is called Calvary,
there they crucified him, and the
malefactors, one on the right hand,
and the other on the left.
34 Then said Jesus, Father,
forgive them; for they know not what
they do. And they ported his
raiment, and cast lots.
35 And the people stood
beholding. And the rulers also with
them derided him, saying, He saved
others; let him save himself, if he be

Christ, the chosen of God.
36 And the soldiers also mocked
him, coming to him, and offering him
vinegar,
37 And saying, If thou be the King
of the Jews, save thyself.
38 And a superscription also was
written over him in letters of Greek,
and Latin, and Hebrew, THIS IS THE
KING OF THE JEWS. ...
50 And, behold, there was a man
named Joseph, a counselor; and he-
was a good man, and a just:
52 This man went unto Pilate, and
begged the body of Jesus.
53 And he took it down, and
wrapped it in linen, and laid it in a
sepulchre that was hewn in stone,
wherein never man before was laid.
HE IS RISEN-MATTHEW 28
In the end of the sabbath, as it
began to dawn toward the first day
of the week, came Mary Magdalene
and the other Mary to see the
sepulchre.
2 And, behold, there was a" gre~it
earthquake; for the angel of the Lord
descended from heaven, and came
and rolled back the stone from the
door and sat upon it.
3 His countenance was like light-
ning, and his raiment white as snow:
4 And for fear of him the keepers
did shake, and became as dead men.
5 And the angel answered and
said unto the women, Fear not ye:

Boston's public schools close
BOSTON-The nation's oldest public school system shut down for two
months beginning early yesterday amid a citywide political and fiscal tangle
that has caused massive layoffs.
Public schools closed their doors at the end of classes yesterday when their
$210 million budget ran out. However, spring vacation begins today and of-
ficials said they expected a bailout measure could be approved in time for
schools to reopen as scheduled April 27.
School Committee officials announced a contingency plan to provide con-
tinuing education should the schools not reopen on time.
Afghan defections reported
NEW DELHI, India-More than 1,000 Afghan officers and soldiers have
defected with their weapons from an infantry division sent to battle Moslem
insurgents, according to a report yesterday from Kabul, the Afghan capital.
The mass defection, one of the largest reported in the three-year Afghan
civil war, robbed the once-crack 7th Infantry Division of nearly half its
strength, said an Afghan source whose reports in the past have later been
confirmed.
There was no independent confirmation of the report. The report said the
Afghan division was sent into battle against insurgents holding Kandahar,
Afghanistan's second largest city.
There has been fierce fighting over the past three months at Kandahar, 30
miles southwest of the capital. Recent reports said government and Soviet.
forces were preparing a new offensive against rebels, who have controlled
most of the city of 200,000.
Few violent crimes reported
WASHINGTON-Only one in three crimes in which force is used or
threatened gets reported to police in America, the world's most violent ,in-
dustrial democracy, a federal task force was told vesterday
The eight-member panel, appointed by Attorney General William French
Smith, is to recommend by mid-June how the federal government can use
existing programs to better combat violent crime. Violent crimes include
rape, robbery, aggravated assault and murder.
Scarr said that the more serious the crime is, the more likely it is to be
reported. But he said more work is needed to understand what he called the
"dark figure of crime," the two-thirds of violent crimes not brought to the at-
tention of police.
Henry Scarr, the head of the Justice Department's Bureau of Justice
Statistics, said the U.S. murder rate of 8.8 homicides per 100,000 people in
1976 was seven times larger than thatin Britain and five times larger than in
Japan.
According to Scarr, the U.S. robbery rate was 17 times higher than
Japan's and eight times higher than Britain's, and the U.S. rape rate was 10
times higher than Japan's and almost 12 times higher than Britain's.
Conjugal visits start at prison
WALLA WALLA, Wash.-There's no room service and the view isn't
much, but to lonely convicts, the three plain mobile homes at the Washington.
State Penitentiary look as good as the swankiest hotel honeymoon suites.
The trailers were installed on the grounds of the 101-year-old penitentiary
as part of a conjugal visit program designed to ease tensions at the prison by
giving inmates a link with life and loved ones on the outside.
Prison Superintendent James Spalding said he finally decided to allow
conjugal visits at the Walla Walla prison after church groups and the
American Correctional Association had been recommending them for three
years.
Defendants cleared in death
of 2-year-old by racoon
MIDLAND-No criminal charges will be filed in the death of a 2-year-old
girl who was mauled in her crib by a pet raccoon that belonged to her
mother's boyfriend, Midland County Prosecutor Gerald White said yester-
day.
White said he would accept a jury's determination that Heather Ann
Sullivan's death was "not unlawful" even though it found the mother and,
boyfriend responsible for her death for failing to take "sufficient
precautions."
The six-member jury cleared the victim's mother, Sharon Ann Sullivan,
and her boyfriend, Wayne Kinney, of any criminal wrongdoing following a
two-day inquest in Midland County District Court.

a

41

. ,i

r

11

be1gMichi-gan 1UaiiIg
Vol. XCI, No. 161
Friday, April 17, 1981
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
scription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail
outside Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday
mornings. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7 by mail outside Ann
Arbor. Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to United Press International.
Pacific News Service. Los Angeles Times Syndicate and Field Newspapers Syndicate.
News room: (313) 764-0552. 76-DAILY: Sports desk: 764-0562: Circulation, 764-0558; Classified advertising
764.0557;:Display advertising. 764-0554:sBilling 764-0550:

'I

Congratulations, Graduates!
You're about to join the good
company of Pulitzer Prize-
winning playwright Arthur
Miller, CBS investigative re-
porter Mike Wallace, opera
singer Jessye Norman, actress
Gilda Radner and the 300,000
other University of Michigan

sociation can advertise, free
of charge, in our "Employ-
ment Wanted" column of the
Alumnus magazine.
Need insurance? You can
participate in our low-cost
term life insurance program.
Moving to a new city? Our
alumni clubs throughout the

bership dues enable us to
provide services such as
student scholarships and
teaching awards.)
You see, we really would
like you to be a part of us.
You're one. You're in good
company
P SOfcomurse we're in-

Editor-in-Chief.....-...........SARA ANSPACH
Monoaging Editor..-....-......JULIE ENGEBRECHT
University Editor-...--....LORENZO BENET
Student Affairs Editor-----------..JOYCE FRIEDEN
City Editor-.....................ELAINE RIDEOUT
Opinion Page Editors..............DAVID MEYER
KEVIN TOTTIS
Arts Editor.....................ANNE GADON
Sports Editor.................MARK MIHANOVIC
Executive Sports Editors...........GREG DEGULIS
MARK FISCHER
BUDDY MOOREHOUSE

BUSINESS STAFF
Business Manager-----NE----TA-F RANDI CIGELNIK
Sales Manager................ BARB FORSLUND
Operations Manager-------------SUSANNE KELLY
Display Manager-----------..MARY ANN MISIEWICZ
Assistant Display Manager---------NANCY JOSLIN
Classified Manogoer DENISE SULLIVAN
Finance Manager--------------..GREGG HADDAD
Nationals Manager.. KATHY BAER
Sales Coordinator . . E ANDREW PETERSEN
BUSINESS STAFF: Bob Abrahams. Meg Armbruster,
Joe Broda, Maureen Detave. Judy Feinberg. Karen

I

i

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan