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April 03, 1981 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-04-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 10-Friday, April 3, 1981-The Michigan Doily

33ORDERlS
a BOOK SHOP
Iou are Cordially Invited.
oa Booksigning
J" . I Fr.

Hash Bash arrests down

(313)668-7652

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O AU jCApril 4
2-4

By DAVID SPAK
After fewer than 500 people attended
the annual Hash Bash Wednesday,
some city and University officials are
predicting the event is finally coming to
an end.
The non-University people "are
finally getting the message" that the
event is "winding down," Director of
Safety Walter Stevens said. Stevens
also said that he talked to several
students who were glad the Hash Bash
seemed to be coming to a close.
AND THE statistics reflect the trend.
Stevens said at its peak, Wednesday's

bash had approximately 450 participan-
ts, mostly from outside the University
community. These numbers are down
from nearly 1,000 last year.
Violations of the law also showed a
marked decrease from last year.
Out of a total of 66 incidents Wed-
nesday, 30 involved possession of
marijuana, five for other controlled
substances, and the rest for various
minor infractions such as trespassing
and allowing dogs to roam without
licenses, according to Ann Arbor Police
Sgt. Harold Tinsey.
LAST YEAR there were 95 incidents,

including one stabbing, according to
Ann Arbor Police Major Robert
Whitaker.
But LSA junior John Carlton is not as
pleased as the officials. He said he was
upset because he feels the non-
University people in attendance were
discriminated against because they
"reflect different values."
"THIS IS ONE day that certain
people are singled out," he said. "On a
normal day, if a student was out on the
Diag with a beer or a (untagged) dog,
no one would bother him."
But Whitaker said the only thing dif-

ferent about Wednesday was that there
were about 30 extra police out.
"We would, if on any other day fin-
ding a minor drinking (or any other law
breaker), do the same thing by
ticketing the violator."
The police were not alerted to any
major incidents in connection with the
Hash Bash, Tinsey said, and the vast
majority of the violators were handed
tickets and future court dates.
Stevens said only a few students were
involved in any of the incidents, but he
will not know the exact number until he
finishes his annual report.

3 4

i

aurday
Apri 4
2-4

ALI ABBAR KHAN
In Concert, Rackham Aud., April 5, 8:00 p.m.
"Without in any way diminishing the stature of the better known Ravi Shanker, Ali Abbor Khan stands
apart todaows one of thr " ost powerful, rtnoving, and technically accomplished musicians in either the
Eastern or Western Wrd -West Australian
"An absolute genius . .. the greatest musician in the world."-Yehudi Menuhin
"Khan's sarod always astounds.. Khan himself is the most sensitive, intuitively masterful musician of
the oge."-San Francisco Chronicle
Accompanied by Zaker Hussain on tablas (drums) has ap-
peared with George Harrison, The Grateful Dead, Van Mor-
rison, The New Orleans Symphony, The London String Quar-
tet, John McLanghlin and Ravi Shanker.
TICKETS: $6.50, $5.00, $3.50
ALL SEATS RESERVED AVAILABLE THROUGH FRI., APRIL 3.
In Ann Arbor-UAC Ticket Central in the Michigan Union, Discount Records,
Liberty Music & Hudsons.
In Lansing, Detroit, Flint, and Toledo-All Hudson Stores & other CTC Ticket
Outlets. Remaining tickets on sale at the door starting 7 p.m.
Presented by: THE RUDI FOUNDATION

More studying
no proven path'
to GPA success

303 South State Street " Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104
Join The Daily News Staff

(Continued from Page 1)
between studying and GPA related to
students who reported seven or more
hours of studying per day. These
students reported comparatively
higher GPAs, Schuman said.
The professor said a correlation was
found between attending class and
GPA. "The more often they (students)
report going to class, the better they
do," he said.
SOME STUDENTS FIND no connec-
tion between studying and test results.
One LSA freshman, who took two tests
for the same class within a week, said,
"The first one I took I didn't study at
all, and for the second one I studied my
butt off. I got the same grade on both."
Many Angell scholars (students who
receive all As or A-s for two consecutive
terms), however, attribute their high
GPAs to studying at greater lengths
than other students.
Larry Blase, an LSA junior and an
Angell scholar, says his weekly
average of 25 study hours puts him in a
different league from his friends.
Blase, who feels studying is "more im-
portant to him than going to class,"
said a student can miss lectures and do
well if he knows the right things to
study.
LSA SENIOR Matthew Horwitch is
the rare student who is able to maintain
a straight-A average and study less
than his friends.
He says studying and balancing his
participation on the tennis team is "a
constant struggle." But Horwitch says
his study time is more concentrated
than a student who "just picks up his
books and goes off to the UGLI."
Students who participate in outside
activities that take up at least as much
time as their studying must manage
their time carefully. Mary Sue Patek,
an LSA sophomore, says she spends
PRIr TIN1G
BASEBALL/SOFTBALL
6" numbers & silkscreened design- s
Many shirt colors & styles
Minimum15 shirts, $8 ea.
plus $30 set-up charge.
Loae eidthe Blind Pig Cafe.
208s. Fstt St. Phone 994-1367

some 30 hours a week working for, In-
tervarsity and Young Life Christian
groups.
"THE ONLY TIME I can study is
past midnight," she said.
Patek, who is seeking a religious
vocation, describes her work as "an
education in itself," a commonO
justification for, the time spent away
from studies by active students.
Sometimes participation in extra-
curricular activities can lead to better
study habits.
LSA sophomore Mary Furgason says
her participation on the Women's sof-
tball team caused her GPA "to go up a
whole point." She said having less time
to study and utilizing her time helped to
stop procrastination.
Study levels may also be strongly
related to field of concentration. The
Sociology 310 survey found that people
in natural sciences reported more study
hours than either students in the social
sciences or humanities.
"In Engineering, you've got to keep
up," sophomore Shelley Crane said.
"Everything practically is required, -so
everyone is competing together. They
(engineering) don't give out As as often
as LSA."
Students with study problems have
several options to better their work
habits. The Coalition for the Use -of
Learning Skills no longer offers specific
study skills programs, but study groups
are held for common introductdry
courses in chemistry, math, and
foreign languages. The voluntary
groups operate on a walk-in basis, and
CULS director John Russ reports a
"big bulge of attendance" around mid-
terms and finals. Students often use the
study groups as "a catch-up service" if
they've fallen behind in class, Russ
said.
Participation in CULS, which has
traditionally served minority studenits,
is open to anyone, Russ said. The study
groups average 25 percent non-
minority participation.
A more drastic alternative to study
problems and related grade worries is
withdrawing from a troubling course.
Withdrawing, which can be done from
the third to ninth week of each term, is
primarily grade oriented, accordingto
Chuck Judge, director of LSA academic
counseling.
Judge said that as many as 1500 drops
occur each term. The poor performan-
ce leading to withdrawals comes rijot
from "an ability issue, but an issue-of
motivation," Judge said. Some with-
drawals come from students "getting
Cs when they prefer to get As," Judge
added.

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MICHIGAN
MEN'S GLEE CLUB
'An Explosion of Sound"
Seven Great Glee Clubs
Two Nights of Song
April 10-11
Hill Auditorium
8 p.m.

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ANN ARBOR'S
PAPER DELIVEI
DOOR BEFORE

ONLY MORNING NEWS-
RS TO YOUR DORM OR
8:00AM TUESDAY-SUNDAY

FRIDAY:
Michigan State
Ferris State
Youngstown
A A .L..,.

~G C 4

SATURDAY:
Notre Dame
Ohio State
Wayne State

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