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March 22, 1981 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1981-03-22

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The Michigan Daily-Sunday, March 22, 1981-Page 3

-HAPPENINGS-
SUNDAY
FILMS
AAFC - Nine Months, 7, 10:20 p.m.; Angi Vera, 8:40 p.m., MLB 3.
Cinema Guild - Gilda, 7 p.m.; Rain, 9 p.m., Lorch Hall Aud.
Cinema II - Ceddo, 7, 9 p.m., Aud. A, Angell.
Mediatrics - Pinocchio, 3, 5, 7 p.m., MLB 4.
MCFT - On the Town, 6,7:45 p.m., Michigan Theater.
SPEAKERS
CCWH - Kenneth Dahlberg, "Seed Patenting: A Key Threat to the
World's Food Future?", 7:30 p.m., Kuenzel Room, Union.
MEETINGS
Breakthrough - 2-4 p.m., Conference Room 5, Union, wheelchair ac
cessible.
Graduate Women's Network - Meeting, pot-luck brunch, noon, 802
Monroe.
PERFORMANCES
Hillel - Israeli folk dancing, 1-3 p.m., 1429 Hill.
Canterbury Loft - Homegrown: Women's Music Series, 7 p.m., 332 South
State.
St. Andrew's Episcopal Church - Ars Musica, Classical concert, 8 p.m.,
306 N. Division. ,
PTP- spring dance concert, "Works by Lucas Hoving," 3 p.m., Power Cen-
ter.
School of Music - Campus Band/Repertory Band, 4 p.m., Hill Aud.
MISCELLANEOUS
Rec. Sports - Family Sunday Funday, "Indoor Soccer," 2-5 p.m.;
Adolescent Program, noon -2 p.m., NCRB.
Karma Thegsum Choling - Discussion on Buddhist Texts, 4-5:30 p.m., 734
Fountain.
MSA - Self-defense class, 5-7 p.m., Union.,
Youth for Understanding - Open House for returnees, 1-4 p.m., 2455
Newbury Court.
WCBN - Studio Live, 9-10 p.m., 88.3 F.M.
Hillel - Deli dinner, 6 p.m.; Hebrew Musicians meet, 8 p.m., 1429 Hill.
National Wildlife Week - Voyages to Save the Whales, speaker from
Greenpeace, 7:30 p.m., 3rd floor miltipurpose room, Undergraduate library.
MONDAY
FILMS
AAFC - One Hour With You, 7, 10:20 p.m.; The Love Parade, 8:30 p.m.,
Lorch Hall Aud.
MCFT - On the Town, 5:45, 7:30 p.m., Michigan Theater.
Women's Study Films - Women Artists, 7 p.m., MLB 3.
Ann Arbor Prisoner's Rights Collective - Juvenile Court, 7 p.m., Whitney
Aud., School of Education Building.
LASC, Ethics and Religion-Battle of Chile, Part 3, 7, 9 p.m., 170 Dennison.
SPEAKERS
Near Eastern and North African Studies - Bag lunch lecture, Ali Amiri,
"How to Choose an Oriental Rug," noon, Lane Hall Commons,
Classical Studies , Herbert Hausmannger, "Stability and Change in the
Reasoning of a Roman Jurist: P. Juventius Celsus," 4:10 p.m., 2009 Angell.
Latin American Monday Lectures - Daniel Levine, "The Cry for Land,"
7:30 p.m., St. Mary's Lounge, 331 Thompson.
Energy Series - Edward Mitchell, "U.S. Petroleum Refining After De-
control," 4 p.m., East Conference Room, Rackham.
MEETINGS
Polish-American Student Association - 7 p.m., Conference room 6, Union.
Med. Center Bible Study - 12:15 p.m., W5603 Main Hospital, Nuclear
Medicine Conference Room.
SACUA -i1:15 pm., 4025 Admin. Building.
Christian Science -7:15 p.m., 3909 Michigan Union.
Black Cinema Guild - Meeting, 8 p.m., 511 E. Hoover, Apt. 6.
Ecology Center - 7:30 p.m., 417 Detroit St.
PERFORMANCES
University Musical Society -- Preservation Hall Jazz Band, 8:30 p.m., Hill
Aud.
MISCELLANEOUS
Rackham Student Gov't - Elections, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Fishbowl; 6-8 p.m.,
Rackham Lobby.
Macromolecular Research - Colloquium, Charles Pittman, Jr., "Effect
of Polymer Matrices on the Selectivity and Activity of Polymer-Bound

Homogeneous Catalysts," 4 p.m., 3005 Chemistry.
Inorganic / Organic Chemistry - Seminar, Manfred Reetz, "C-C Bond
Formation Via Lewis Acidic Organometallic Reagents," 3 p.m., 1200
Chemistry.
Int. Folk Dance Club - Beginners teaching, 7-8:15 p.m., 3003 ELI.
LASC - Bucket drive to benefit people of El Salvador, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.,
various locations around Ann Arbor/Campus.
Dratbman Theater Company - auditions, technical designers wanted, 7-11
p.m:, 2508 Frieze Bldg.
SOAP - Workshop on leadership transition, 7-9 p.m., Welker Room,
Union.
WCBN -Women's Affairs Program, 6-7 p.m., 88.3 F.M.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of;
Happenings, Tie Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI., 48109.

Michigan auto history traced

By LISA SPECTOR
Shortly before the turn of the century,
inventors in Europe and the eastern
United States led in the development of
the automobile. But, within a decade,
Detroit led the world in automobile
production.
Since many areas appeared to have
the potential to produce the vehicle,
why did Michigan become America's
automobile capital?
OVER THE YEARS, historians have
been puzzled by this question. Many
speculated that Michigan's
geographical, industrial, and economic
conditions elevated the state to the
forefront of the industry.
John Rae, dubbed the dean of
automotive historians, and a professor
of history at Harvey Mudd College in
Claremont, Calif., httributes the oc-
curance to chance.
In a special issue of the Michigan
Quarterly Review, a general interest
publication of the Rackham graduate
school, Rae explains his theory.
ALTHOUGH CONDITIONS in
Michigan were extremely favorable for
the rise of the automobile industry,

Rae's article states the evolution oc-
cured because industrialists like Henry
Ford, Ransom Olds, and William
Durant "were there, in the right place,
at the right time and with the right
talents."
Among the factors responsible for
Michigan's initial appeal were its
geographic location, which provides
easy access to the essential raw
materials and the availability of in-
vestment capital from the homestate
mining and lumber industries.
While these ingredients were
necessary for successful automobile
production, they were not sufficient,
Rae states. "It was, in a sense, the
gravitational attraction of the mass,
but the mass had to be created first,"
he added.
OF THE MEN WHO composed this
"mass," most lived in Michigan.
Among them were Ford, who founded
the Ford Motor Company in 1903; Olds,
inventor of the "Merry Oldsmobile,"
the first popular gasoline car produced
in large quantities; and Durant, foun-
der of General Motors.
Rae argues that others came to

Michigan "by chance or by choice," but
historian George May, in his book A
Most Unique Machine, points out that
they all had one thing in common.
"They became utterly dedicated to
the manufacture of motor vehicles, to
the point where they seem to have
preferred to go broke making
automobiles than to get rich doing
anything else," May states.
Ford, Olds, Durant, and others like
themn were also, Rae claims, "men of
exceptional entrepreneurial and
technical talent." In Michigan, it was
the right time for this kind of talent and
this concentration of individuals served

as the "catalyst."
David Lewis, University professor of.
business history and guest editor of
"The Automobile in American
Culture," regarded Rae's theory as the
best of the responses he received con-
cerning the question.
Lewis added that also of significance'
was the failure of other American cities
to predict the future direction the in-
dustry would take.
"Whiel Detroit industrialists were
working on gasoline powered engines,
New England concentrated upon steam
and electric powered engines," he said.
"They bet on the wrong horse."

Apartment residents
debate conversion

By CAROL CHALTRON
Students living in Huron Towers
Apartments, located near North Cam-
pus, are divided over a proposed plan
which would convert the building into a
cooperative.
The plan calls' for downpayments of
from $600 to $1,600, which some studen-
ts say they would be unable to pay.
ACCORDING TO Paul Pratt,
president of the Huron Towers Residen-
ts Association, individual residents'
payments would go toward the total
downpayment of $350,000 needed to
purchase the building from the federal
government's Department of Housing
and Urban Development.
Under the proposal, the building
would be owned by a non-profit cor-
poration in which residents would own
shares. Seventy pericent of the residents
must approve the plan.
Instead of paying rent, residents
would pay carrying charges that would
cost about the same as rent and would
go toward maintenance and mortgage
payments.
Many working residents favor the
plan because a cooperative is con-
sidered a form of ownership, which
qualifies for tax breaks. In addition,
said tenant Richard Barfield, the plan
will give residents more control over
expenditures.
ACCORDING TO building manager
Mary Kilgore, about 35 percent of the
tenants are University students. Many
oppose the plan because of the costs in-
volved.
LSA senior Lynne Cole said the plan
"could be a good thing," but added that
she does not have the money to make
The School of Music presents:
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
DANCE
COMPANY

the downpayment. Cole is counting on
government red tape to delay approval
of the proposal so she can remain in the
building until she graduates in Decem-
ber.
Another student, business school
junior Tom Campbell, said he probably
will be unable to get his downpayment
back when he sells, and therefore won't
buy into the co-op.
OTHER STUDENTS favor the plan.
Greg Bower, an engineering school
senior, supports the proposal and hopes
.to be working by the time the
cooperative package is completed so he
can make the downpayment.
LSA senior Tom Valerio said he
believes the plan is "great" and
because he works part-time, will not
have troble coming up with the down-
payment.
HUD has asked $4,070,000 for the
building, and the proposal is in
Washington awaiting the agency's ap-
proval. Residents of the apartment
building must then agree to the plan
before the cooperative begins
operation.

in
(Baits, Oxford, Cambridge and Fletcher only)
Applications will be available to all students
WEDNESDAY, APRL t,1981
THE HOUSINGINFORMATION OFFICE
1011 S'TUDENT ACTIVI1TIES BUILDING
A drawing will be used to
establish priority for assignment.
Apply anytime between
8:00 AM and 4:00 PM
April1, 1981
Do NOT Line Up Early!
Do NOT Camp Overnight!

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