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March 10, 1981 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-03-10

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Page 2-Tuesday, March 10, 1981-The Michigan
Swift
cleanup of
.TMI waste
advised

From UPI and AP
WASHINGTON - The damaged Three Mile Island
reactor must be cleaned up swiftly to keep radioac-
tivity from tainting nearby water and prevent a chain
reaction from restarting in the fuel core, a federal
report said yesterday.
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff, in a
final envirnomental impact statement, said "a
paramount objective" of the cleanup is removal of
the damaged fuel core to safe storage before some
equipment failure permits a chain reaction to start
again by accident, releasing core radioactivity.
THE STAFF OF THE NRC said contaminated
waster at the site near Harrisburg, Pa., can be
removed "without incurring environmental impacts
that exceed acceptable risks" but the job will take at
least three years, and possibly another four.
The 1,300-page report strongly rejected any notion

of making the facility, where a near reactor melt-
down occurred in March of 1979, a permanent
disposal site for nuclear wastes.
"The location, geology and hydrology of Three Mile
Island are among the factors that do not meet the
current criteria for a safe long-term waste disposal
facility," the report said.
IN CALLING FOR A "timely" cleanup, the NRC
staff said: "The cleanup operations will remove
sources of potential radiation exposure that currenly
pose risks to the health and safety of station workers
and the public."
The eventual removal of the wastes to another site
would be along routes ranging from 370 miles to West
Valley, N.Y., to 2,750 miles, to Hanford, Wash., the
report said. It estimated 700,000 people live along the
longest route and 125,000 along the shortest.

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports

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Wet landing strip
may force NASA
to use backup runway

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From UPI and AP
HOUSTON - Space shuttle com-
mander John Young said yesterday wet
conditions at the Mohave Desert lan-
ding strip in California may force next
month's orbital test flight to end with a
landing on a backup runway in New
Mexico.
A space agency spokesman at the
flight test center at Edwards Ait Force
INSTANT
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Base said it has been estimated it will
take four weeks for the shuttle runway
to dry out from a two-day winter storm
that struck last week.
THE LAUNCH OF the reusable
spacecraft tentatively is scheduled for
April 7. The first flight is to last 54%
hours with Crippen and Commander
John Young at the controls.
The secondary landing area at the
Army's White Sands Missile Range in
southern New Mexico also is located on
a dry lake bed. It is called Northrup
Strip.
Young said at the space pilots' final
pre-launch news conference he was
concerned about the wet conditions at
Edwards and was told by an "unof-
ficial, unauthoritative" source Friday
it would take four to six weeks for the
desert runway to dry.
"WE'LL JUST HOPE that the lake
bed at Edwards dries out and if it
doesn't, we'll have to go to Northrup,"
the veteran astronaut said.
"When we were planning to launch in
March, I forecast as long as three years
ago that we'd have this problem,"
Young said later in an interview. "It's
just one of these things - it's a nagging
thing."
"It's just something that has to be
watched in real time. If the lake bed
dries out at Edwards, we go to Edwar-
ds. If it doesn't, we go to Northrup."
THE ASTRONAUTS have practiced
landing numerous times in special air-
craft at both Edwards and Northrup, as
well as on the 15,000-foot concrete run-
way at the Kennedy Space.-Center at
Cape Canaveral, which could be used
for an emergency landing if an engine
failure kept the shuttle from reaching
orbit.

Advisers arrive in Salvador
SAN SALVADOR-American military advisers arrived here over the
weekend, bringing the number of U.S. military personnel in this strife-torn
Central American country to 50.
Meanwhile, fighting intensified between the Salvadoran civilian-military
junta troops and leftist guerrillas about 25 miles north of San Salvador, El
Salvador's capital. Military officials said the U.S.-backed junta sent reinfor-
cements to Suchitoto, a small town north of the capital currently caught up
in a fierce off-and-on battle.
The new American advisers will help train Salvadoran troops and sailors
in their fight to quell the leftist insurgency and will not take part in combat
operations.t
Reagan wants to ease
air pollution regulation
WASHINGTON-The Reagan Administration yesterday proposed marked
changes in the nation's clean air laws which would relax requirements
governing the expansion of factories in polluted areas-especially cities.
The administration has said the changes are necessary to reduce
regulatory red tape which inhibits industrial productivity. But environmen-
talists, mobilizing to fight the proposed changes, said the relaxation of
governmental control would condemn urban and industrial areas to more
years of pollution and might negate recent improvements in the air quality
of some areas.
Polish labor talks break
down again, despite optimism
WARSAW, Poland-Talks aimed at averting a strike in the textile center
of Lodz broke down early today despite the efforts of the government and
national leaders of the independent union Solidarity to preserve Poland's
fragile labor truce.
"Unfortunately, we have a complete deadlock," said Lodz Solidarity
leader Jerzy Kropiwnicki, adding that today's one-hour warning strike by
some 500,000 workers in 1,300 plants and enterprises would begin as planned
at 4 a.m. EST.
Kropiwnicki said he hoped "some decision on the highest level would make
it possible to turn back our plans" for a subsequent province-wide general
strike beginning in stages Thursday.
Solidarity leader Lech Walesa had been optimistic yesterday that the
strike over the firing last month of five hospital employees, four of them
Solidarity organizers, could be averted following his talks with Deputy
Premier Mieczyelaw Rakowski. The three-hour meeting here produced an
agreement in principle on grievances in Lodz, a strike alert in Radom, and
other divisive issues.
Pakistani hijaekers release

b

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Th quickest way to get
emergency money.

stewardess; 100 still held
DAMASCUS, Syria-Three Pakistani hijackers released a stewardess last
night from aboard a jet holding more than 100 hostages in the ninth day of the
longest-ever hijack ordeal.
Upon her release, Farzana Sharif said the passengers' situation was ex-
tremely difficult, "especially since they all know the hijackers will blow up
the entire plane."
The hijackers threatened "decisive action" unless their demands, in-
cluding the release of Pakistani political prisoners, were met.
Pakistan's President Zia ul-Haq said he would never release "hardened
criminals," and authorized the Syrian officials to use whatever methods
they deemed warranted to Settle the incident-including a commando raid
upon the jet.
Administration opposes limnits
on Japanese car imports
WASHINGTON-The administration said yesterday it opposes a quota on
Japanese car imports and is on the verge of proposing a three to five-year
relief package for the devastated U.S. auto industry.
"Legislation to impose a quota'would be counterproductive at this time,"
Commerce Secretary Malcolm Baldrige told a Senate trade subcommittee.
The panel's chairman, Sen. John Danforth (R-Mo.) is sponsoring a bill to
limit Japanese imports to 1.6 million cars a year-300,oo0 less than last year.
Crushed by Japanese imports, which make up about 25 percent of the U.S.
market, American automakers lost $4.2 billion last year.
Vol. XCI, No. 128
Tuesday, March 10, 1981
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109.
Subscription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail
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The Michigan Daily is a member af the Associated Press and subscribes to United Press International.
Noces rom (33 6-52 6DIY Spdrts d e 764-052 Circulaon. 764-.05: Classified advertising
764-0557; Display advertsing 74054 Biaing-64-055 Composing room.74-0.

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Editor-in-chief ..................SARA ANSPACH
Managing Editor..............JULIE ENGEBRECHT
University Editor................LORENZO BENET
Student Affairs Editor .............. JOYCE FRIEDEN
City Editor.......... ............ ELAINE RIDEOUT
Opinion Page Editors ................ DAVID MEYER
KEVIN TOTTIS
Arts Editor.........................ANNE GADON
Sports Editor...................MARK MIHANOVIC
Executive Sports Editors...........GREG DEGULIS
MARK FISCHER
BUDDYnvMOOREHUSEic

BUSINESS STAFF
Business Manager. ... RANDI CIGELNIK
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BUSINESS STAFF: Bob Abrahams. Meg Armbruster,
Joe Broda. Maureen OePLave. Judy Feinberg. Koren

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