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February 20, 1981 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1981-02-20

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, February 20, 1981-Page 5
INTERNSHIPS SCARCE

Fed job freeze may hit students

FALL 1981
WASHINGTON SEMESTER
The American University
separate programs in
CRIMINAL JUSTICE " URBAN AFFAIRS
NATIONAL GOVERNMENT " FOREIGN POLICY
ECONOMIC POLICY * AMERICAN STUDIES
JOURNALISM

By STEVE HOOK
* President Reagan's hiring freeze
threatens to throw a menacing wrench
in the plans of thousands of college
students nationwide who have spent the
past several years training for work in
the federal government.
The hiring freeze will affect most en-
try level government jobs, as well as
summer internship programs
previously, offered in Washington,
.Reagan administration officials said.
Although government representatives
continue to hold civil service exams and
interview prospective employees, they
say there will be no job openings in
many departments until they are given
themord from the White House.
HERE AT THE University,
spokespersons from the political scien-
ce department, the Institute for Public
Policy Studies, and the Office of Career
Planning and Placement were uncer-
tain how the freeze will affect their
*students. Most said they are awaiting
specific details from Washington.
"I don't know; everything is com-
pletely up in the air," said Vicki
Lawrence, a career resource specialist
at CPP. "Everybody is sort of sitting
and waiting to see what Reagan will
do." She said she doesn't know when
specific details concerning federal in-
ternships will be released from the Of-
fice of Management and Budget, but
4expects more information later this
month.
"I don't think anyone knows what the
full impact will be," said William Kin-
caid, the assistant director for student
affairs at IPPS. The institute is a
graduate program that combines
political science and economics in-
struction, and graduates about 40
students each year-most of whom seek
government work at some
level-federal, state, or local.
"IT'S A RATHER serious thing,"
0 Kincaid added, "but we're not leaping
off Burton Tower."
There has been a great deal of con-
fusion whether the freeze would apply
to summer internships. According to
one government spokesman, most of
these programs will also be nixed.

"Internships will be included in the
freeze," said Jesse Hoskins, a
representative of the federal gover-
nment's Office of Peisonnel
Management in Detroit. He explained
that any addition to a government staff,
or an "accession," is restricted, "and
that would include internships."
THE FREEZE on internships carries
several exemptions with it, according
to Kincaid. Among these are:
* The many non-paying federal inter-
nships;
* Internships using non-
governmental funds to pay interns

All first-year IPPS students are
required to find a summer "policy-
analysis" internship, either in the
public or private sector. During spring
break, nearly 40 IPPS job hunters will
be "pounding the pavement" in
Washington, D.C., saidDiane Baker,
who will be among the 40.
"IF NOBODY gets a job, nobody
knows what will happen to the
requirement," she said. She added that
potential employers in Washington
have been very cordial, "proceeding as
if there will be jobs." If a federal inter-
nship is not available, Baker said she

shrinkthe federal government's size,
preferred a tougher hiring freeze.
The freeze has no expiration date,
and it can be lifted at any time by
President Reagan. As a result of its un-
certain future, representatives from
the federal government have continued
to visit campus and interview
graduating students.
"When the freeze is over," said
William Kincaid, "they'll want to have
the names in hand."

programs include:
" SEMINARS WITH DECISION MAKERS
* INTERNSHIPS ON CAPITAL HILL, IN
GOVERNMENT AGENCIES, WITH
PUBLIC INTEREST GROUPS

for,furthe'r information write:
Washington, Semestr rog'irams
Ward Circle Bldg. 216
W~ashington. D.C. 20016

The American University is an Equal Opportunity Affirmative Action University.

r.

"I don't

think

anyone

knows

what

the

full impact will be . . It's a rather serious
thing, but we're not leaping off Burton
Tower." - William Kincaid
Institute for Public Policy Studies
assistan t director

(several interest groups, public service
organizations, etc., subsidize students
working in Washington);
* Executive Office interns-those
who would work in or for the White
House (such as OMB and the U.S.
Trade Representative Office), and;
" Seasonal hiring of temporary em-
ployees (primarily for such areas as
parks management and forest service).
The students themselves also seem to
be in the dark.
"MOST PEOPLE aren't too sure yet.
The people in Washington seem uncer-
tain about the freeze," said IPPS
student Edward Taylor. He applied for
a position at the federal government's
Agency for International Development,
but saw his application get buried as of-
ficials there try to untangle the hiring
freeze's limitations and exemptions.
"People in general have been getting
the reaction that Washington doesn't
seem to know what to do yet," Taylor
said.

will go to the state or local level to find
work.
Political Science Prof. George
Grassmuck said he is optimistic that
undergraduates from his department
will be able to find'some type of inter-
nships this summer, despite the hiring
freeze.
More than 20 University students
found work last summer with the
government, Grassmuck said, and he
expects most internship seekers will be
successful if they look for jobs that are
exempt from the freeze and apply for
positions at the local or state level.
"IT'S NOT GOING to hurt that
much," he said. "People can go down
there (Washington) and get jobs." He
said the University's Alumni
Association in Washington provides a
"grapevine" that serves as a reliable
tool for University graduates.
The hiring freeze is administered by
the Office of Management and Budget
under President Reagan's "Bulletin 81-
6" directive, which he signed on his fir-
st day in office. Former President Car-
ter had a more relaxed hiring limitation
plan, which called for the hiring of one
federal staff member for every two
vacated positions. Reagan, however,
consistent with his goal to significantly

A CAREER
IN THE CHIPS
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..x

-'I

On -Campus
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Wednesday, March 11

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ByJIMSPARKS
Shrimp boils, catfish fries, and the
Atlantic surf will be in sight for 15,
students from the School of Natural
Resources as they hea outh for mid-
winter break. ,
But, the group will spend more time
*looking at southern pine trees than they
will lounging on sandy beaches - they
will be studying the planting, logging
and mill operations of several large
forestry firms.
THE WEEK-LONG trip will include
stops in Georgia and South Carolina.
The excursion will give the students
the opportunity to speak with
professionals in the field about their
newest projects, and supplement
classroom experience with actual field
work.
Senior forestry major Gregory
Oswald, who went on the group's trip to
Mississippi, Alabama and Arkansas
last year, said he is going again this
year to "see what is actually out in the
field." Although Oswald said he hopes
to make job contacts at companies, he
visits, he characterized the trip as
"more of an educational-type thing."
'At first you think this is just a lot of
loblolly pine, but by the fourth or fifth
day you realize that there are a lot of
different philosophies of forest
management at work here," Oswald
added.

WITH JOB possibilities with the
federal-government greatly reduced
because of a sagging economy, "some
75 percent of our forestry graduates can
expect to work in the private sector as
consultants or employees of small and
large industrial forestry products fir-
ms," said Prof. Douglas McKinnon,
who will lead the trip.
A similar trip out West is scheduled
for May. Both the western and southern
trip are preceded by a series of lectures
by experts in the forestry concerns of
that area.
This spring, the group will cover 2,600
miles in eight days.
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_________ U F

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